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9

Your flavors can be grouped in water soluble and oil soluble. Alcohol now is a mixture - some oil soluble flavors are also soluble in alcohol. These are phenylpropanoids, like Coumarin or all flavors that are themselves based on alcohol, like Hexanol. Alcohol is not a better extractor for flavors, just one with shared properties of water and oil, without ...


5

Some powders mix better with cold water than hot, and milk powder seems to be one of them. Making a paste using a small amount of water also helps. You can make a paste of cold water and milk powder in the cup before adding the tea, or you can make the paste, add the tea, optional sugar and more water, then boil. You may be able to put the powder in the ...


4

Why not make it how you like it at home? Here's your best bet (and a very simple suggestion); buy a good thermos. You can get a 24 ounce one for about $30 which will work incredibly well, and last you a lifetime unlike most cooking appliances. When you properly prime a thermos with boiling water, it can keep beverages piping hot for upwards of 12 hours. This ...


4

Have you tried steeping the tea in the milk? Whenever I make milk tea, I always do a 3/5th cup of whole milk, 1/5th cup of condensed milk (for sweetness) and 1/5th cup of water. I then bring the mixture of milks and water up to about 140F and steep my green tea and spices in it. This gives me a nice thick latte-like consistency and strong milk taste without ...


3

In my house, we have a rectangular-cylindrical metal pot that is used to make only chai. It does not have a specific name, although the class of utensils that it comes from are called patila (Hindi), patela (Marathi) (attaching a picture) . In my experience, most Indian households do have a seperate patila/patela for making chai. Hope this helps!


3

If you want more milk flavor, add more condensed milk. Milk has a very subtle flavor, so even with condensed milk, two teaspoons really isn't very much. If by the time you get enough of that in, the tea flavor is too diluted, make tea concentrate the next time - steep the tea in less water.


3

It depends on how they are dried. Though if they're properly dehydrated or freeze-dried then you're just rehydrating them in the tea and they'll taste ok. Ginger: I prefer fresh ginger and find that there are some taste notes that aren't present in the dried tea, it makes more pleasant with fresh ginger, but it's more work. Chili: While I haven't tried ...


2

Proctor Silex makes a 32oz hot pot that you can cook in. My husband travels a lot and always packs it. He makes oatmeal and ramen noodles in it. I don't see why you wouldn't be able to make your tea in it. We always get it from Bed, Bath, and Beyond, but I'm sure other places carry it. Plus it's only $15! http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/...


1

I personally use both whole spices and ground spices for making chai. It all depends on what spices you are using and the quantity. I always crush cardamom for chai to bring out the flavor. I crush or grate ginger. cinnamon and clove can be used as whole just for convenience. But imagine making tea for 10 to 20, I will just add whole spices for time saving.


1

Well, I cracked it and tasted better than Costa or Starbucks. I used hot milk with seasonings and a Twinnings chai teabag steeped in hot water. Microwave 3/4 cup milk one minute. Add cardamom seeds, cloves, cinnamon, black pepper, a teaspoon of honey, ginger, a teaspoon of vanilla (Monza), and anise seed to the milk. Whisk with a battery whisker (...


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