7

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "not replace the water". Pancetta is cured using a dry cure process. This does result in water/liquid leaching from the belly. It does, of course, become part of the cure, but it is a dry cure, as opposed to a brine cure. In any case, skin on or skin off should not matter. I prefer the flat pancetta (and leave the ...


4

I am using a frost-free freezer (large) and at the moment am drying 7kg. I have a temp controller which works perfectly, but as the weather changes I get a lot of variation. A humidistat controls a humidifier, so have no trouble in keeping the humidity up, which I like to in the early stages. The problem arises overnight when the ambient temp is lower than ...


4

While you might be technically correct if you were to call saucisson sec a salami, you do not make saucisson sec from commercial salami. Without knowing how the salami was produced it could be dangerous to try to do so. The pictures you posted seems to be of a cooked salami, which is significantly more perishable than its uncooked cousins. Traditionally, ...


4

You would potentially grow bacteria that would make you sick. The production of cured sausage has to follow a specific process that makes use of the correct balance of salt, water activity, and acidity (often, along with the addition of nitrates) to create a safe product. You can certainly make fresh sausage and cook fully, or refrigerate for a few days, ...


3

Safety concerns aside (although this is related), the issue with this approach is case hardening. That is, the sausage, salumi, or whole muscle dries too quickly and unevenly. The exterior becomes too dry, while the interior is not dry enough. The hardening of the exterior, then further limits the drying of the interior. Hanging meat to dry, in the ...


3

Coppa (aka capocollo) is a type of cold cut (salume) in Italy. You'll see it with different names, including capocollo, lonza, and lonzino. They are all made from the same part of pork. It comes from the neck to the fourth or fifth rib of the pork shoulder or neck, and the name "capo-collo" means "head-neck." "Di Parma" simply means from Parma, and it means ...


3

Disclaimer: This answer doesn't include anything about Speck. There is a great article by Roberta Schira where the differences between Prosciutto di Parma and Jamón Iberico are explained. I'll try to summarize the article below, but please check the full article which has many more details... ... they are both raw hams but entirely different. Both belong ...


3

I've done a lot of grinding of wild game for over 30 years and used all kinds of grinders both electric and manual. For manual grinders, try attaching a steering wheel from a car as this will give you more torque and make it ten times easier to grind. On electric grinders such as the Kitchen Aid meat grinding attachment, be sure to use the coarse grinding ...


3

The risk you have is that if you do not inhibit bacteria growths not only can spoilage occur but mold can grow as well. The Biltong I make is hung for 10 - 14 days. That is a long while for micro organism to have there way with your meat. You must take precautions This is very scary as unless you have a laboratory at hand you are playing the proverbial ...


3

Actually, it sounds like everything went right to me, that's a classic terrine. You simply picked the wrong recipe if you don't want fat - 1/4 of it is lard after all. When you cooked it the fat melted and got squeezed out to the sides, that's perfectly normal. If you want less fat then replace fat with gelatine which will solidify to hold it all together.


2

if you are using a stble controlled mold (ie. Bactoferm 600 or mondostart etc.) the mold should appear white. if you are begginning to get blue spores there is most likely an issue with air circulation or moreso the relative humidity of the chamber. Humidity should reach into the mid 70s for proper mold growth. to counteract mold one can also purchase ...


2

To clarify, after your comments on Moscafj's answer and your comments: To have your sausages safe, it is not enough to have them in an oven set to 150 F. Rather, you have to ensure that their internal temperature goes from room to over 140 quickly enough (less than 2 hours), and this won't happen in an oven set to 150 F. It can happen either in an oven set ...


2

There are several additional questions that your original question brings about, if you are in the context of the USDA and regulations. Whether or not the USDA allows for this kind of sausage production is a different question to whether or not there are producers who are actually doing it. Are you interested in producing the sausages yourself to sell, or ...


1

Typically, the hanging of meat is done to promote certain microorganisms, so that they can ferment certain sugars in the meat. This leads to the production of lactic acid by the various strains of Lactobacillus microbes. This can only be done when the meat is correctly cured. A dehydrator is not typically meant for meat, but as a way to preserve certain ...


1

There's no real difference, coppa and capocollo are synonyms. We call this cut also "ossocollo" (neck bone) where I live (Veneto, northern Italy). Other regions call it with different names; for a full list please check: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coppa_(salume)


1

This is difficult to assess and provide a definitive solution for because you've got several conditions that are not ideal. As you point out, your temp is too high and your humidity is too low, for starters. Given the 7 day cure, I would normally say you are ok from a safety perspective, however, I am concerned by the "leaking", but that may just be the ...


1

Canned corned beef is sort of Spam, but with different meat and flavoring. It's also more like hash, and doesn't always cleanly slice the same way Spam does. I definitely wouldn't put it on a Reuben sandwich, but it could work with cabbage. (Not great with cabbage, but that's an opinion issue -- I'm not a big fan of canned meat in general.) In contrast, a ...


1

I've made pancetta many times. When rolling, I just tie with a string. Traditionally, it is just tied off. Personally, I prefer the results when I just hang it without rolling...poke a hole, loop a string, hang...but that is just personal preference. The only downside I can see to the cheese cloth, is that it might slightly slow the drying process. Other ...


1

Terrines almost always shrink. The water in the ingredients evaporates out, so the volume reduces - there's nothing you can do about that. However, not filling the mould will have exacerbated the problem. All terrine recipes are careful to state that the mould should be filled - yours even says to mound it slightly. It also says to use caul fat to help it ...


1

The short answer is within the ranges you describe, humidity is more important than temperature. Reasonable temperature fluctuations will have little effect, because you've already created an environment hostile (hostile, not impervious) to harmful organisms. "Spoilage" is cause by bacterial action. If bacteria and other organisms cannot survive, multiply, ...


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