35

The rind of Brie is Penicillium Camemberti it's a completely harmless fungus which gives brie its taste. You can eat it, or not, up to you: you are supposed to. If it smells very strongly of ammonia the cheese is just a bit too ripe but it won't do you any harm.


31

There are dozens if not hundreds of kinds of cheese in the world. Several kinds of non-shelf-stable cheese do not contain any added salt, just the natural salt content of the milk. Quark is a prominent example, paneer can also be made without salt. Of course paneer will reflect the taste of the acid that was used, for example lemon juice - it is up to you ...


18

Three factors influence how well cheese melts: The amount of moisture, The amount of fat, How it was set. The meltiest cheeses have a lot of moisture and fat and were set with rennet and not acid. Both moisture and fat leave space between the casein proteins that allows them to move. Otherwise they are packed together and don't flow as well. Aged cheeses ...


13

Cheese salt is just non-iodized salt, generally in flake form; the iodine would interfere with the cultures, and flakes are good for salting surfaces. So kosher salt and flaky sea salt are both essentially the same thing and viable substitutes.


11

Yogurt whey cannot be used to make ricotta. With most cheeses, including mozzarella, the milk isn't boiled. The casein proteins are bound up with some of the lactose and almost all the fat to make the curd. The whey for such cheeses contains the rest of the lactose, tons of vitamin B, and almost all the albumin. The albumin proteins are water soluble when ...


11

You can use UHT milk in cheeses that don't contain rennet, basically cheeses that are formed by adding acid to milk, allowing it to curdle, and then separating the whey. Quark, Paneer, Queso Fresco and Ricotta are all cheeses of this type. Opinions differ on whether UHT milk can make good cheese of this type, but it's clear that you can achieve cheese. ...


10

The problem with buying tailoring fabric for food use is that sometimes such fabric is treated. Many treatments are not especially problematic (for example starch), but there are others - there is a method for making shirt fabric wrinkle-free which uses formaldehyde. It is the best to buy real cheesecloth, created for this purpose. The second best option ...


9

I've done this and it'll work, but your yield will be small. With a gallon of quality milk, my yield is about one pound of mozz. Divide that by four and it ends up being about 4 oz. Use an appropriate size pot and microwave container... And use a thermometer. I've only used liquid rennet and I don't think there's much difference in dissolving the tabs. I'...


8

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


8

I use cloth diapers. The old-fasioned kind, without print (and never used for the original purpose, of course). They are pure cotton, can be boiled and are just the right balance between density and looseness. Pretty cheap, too. I prefer their square shape over rectangular tea towels when it comes to tying the corners to filter/press something. Basically ...


7

Harold McGee, in On Food and Cooking, is very detailed in his explanation of how cheese "works". He describes three stages. In the first stage, lactic acid bacteria convert milk sugar into lactic acid. In the second stage, which overlaps with the first one, rennet (an extract of calf stomach - or, to be more precise, chymosin, a protein found in this ...


7

It is mostly about how much water is left in the curd- how hard and long you press it, aging, and sometimes microbial growth. Soft cheeses like cream cheese are only barely pressed. Fresh soft cheeses like queso fresco and paneer aren't even pressed at all- just hung to dry. Cheddar is pressed firmly and aged for a relatively short time. Cheeses like ...


7

You do need to be quite accurate with proportions if you were to try this in smaller quantities; the rennet and acid interact to cause the milk to curdle and produce the final texture. If you throw that balance off, your results may differ in unpredictable and possibly unpleasant ways. Times will need to be adjusted as well because everything will move ...


7

The making of cheese greatly reflects the areas where the cheese comes from. The diet of the cows have a profound effect on the cheese as well does certain atmospheric condition. A cow that has lived at altitude in the Swiss Alps' milk and also by extension its cheese will taste different. I know my local cheese that is made nearly a mile above sea ...


7

Milk proteins will coagulate at particular temperatures and Phs. You wrote that you used 2 Tbs of lemon juice but you didn't say how much milk you added that to. If you used too much milk then the mixture will not be acidic enough. Follow a recipe. You also wrote that you boiled the milk once. I don't know if it is a language barrier issue but it sounds ...


7

It's a bad recipe. Here's why: The way to make mozzarella without using citric acid is to use cheese cultures to acidify the curd, since in order to achieve the cheese's characteristic stretchiness it needs to have a pH of between 5.0 and 5.6.. That recipe has you add a "culture": Add 1tsp natural yoghurt for each liter of milk (I doubled this) ... ...


6

The other answers refer to products that are cheese-flavored fudges or cream cheeses blending with cocoa. Your question seems like it is asking about making a cocoa flavored cheese from scratch. I have not tried chocolate in particular but I have been experimenting with flavoring cheese (and tofu) and have some data points that might be helpful. I have ...


6

The self-appointed Cheese Queen, Ricky, recommends making mozzarella from dry-milk powder and added cream if you're in an area where you can only get UHT milk: Mozzarella from Instant Nonfat Dry Milk and Cream. That may be a better option that trying Mozzarella from UHT milk. Which, as @Jolenealaska points out, is known to be pretty bad. Alternately, you ...


6

No, cheese is not seasoned by default. Some cheeses do contain salt, or herbs, or spices - but any spices, seasonings, or salts are considered as much a part of the finished cheese as the starter culture or the milk. It would be like asking if you can get pickles that are unseasoned, when it's the vinegar or spices in the brine that makes them pickled, ...


6

Just one day? Feta is assembled in one day but it is pickled in a brine for at least a week. Recipes I've used call for 10 days. This time gives bacteria extra time to work and make the product more sour. I've had good success just using buttermilk as my mesophilic starter. I suspect your starter will be better than mine. Just give it time.


6

According to the US Department of Agriculture's FoodData, there is 0.76 g of protein in 100 g of acid whey (whey from drained yoghurt; whey from cheese production is "sweet"). According to the same source, a quart of acid whey weighs 984 g, so 24 fl oz weighs 738 g, and therefore contains 5.6 g or 0.2 oz of protein total. Even if none of it passed through ...


5

1- Is this a valid approach and I should just add a lot more of my flavoring agents? Yes, you can make additions to your curd prior to pressing/knitting just like with cheese. Adding bits of dried peppers ala pepper jack cheese sounds like a great idea. The main concern in this regard is to avoid adding so much adjuncts that the tofu curd fails to knit ...


5

I think point 1 in Carmi's answer is largely the explanation but I thought I'd add to it with some data I found in a recent article. The AV Club (of all places) released an article in 2016 titled "Why don't we drink pigs milk?" While this question is about cheese, milk is first required for cheese to happen, so if there's difficulty in obtaining a supply of ...


5

The resultant cheese in your first link will be a fresh, soft cheese, nothing like either of the Parmesan or cheddar cheeses mentioned in your second link. It is also an acid-based cheese, not a made with either rennet or bacterial cultures as are most other cheeses. Parmesan is a very long aged cheese. Cheddar is a... well... cheddared cheese (cheddaring ...


5

The white part is curd and the yellow part is whey. They can be separated in milk by the presence of acid, and helped along by enzymatic action. More acid typically yields better separation. Fresh cheeses are produced by directly adding acid such as vinegar or lemon juice. In cultured diary products such as yogurt and all other cheese, the acid is produced ...


5

The problem is the organic milk. Or rather, the fact that organic milk available in grocery stores is high-temperature pasteurized, rather than conventionally pasteurized. That helps it keep a lot longer, but it disrupts the proteins so that they don't coagulate well enough for cheese. I'm told that there are brands of conventionally-pasteurized organic ...


5

In general, calcium chloride is used in cheese making to stabilize and firm up the curd. It's more necessary in milk that has gone through the standard modern processing routine (pasteurization, homogenization, etc.). Heating and harsh handling of the milk messes up the balance of calcium in various milk components, and adequate calcium is needed to ...


5

Cream cheese is a distinct product, with a flavour and texture of its own. I don't think you'd get the right texture by crumbling paneer into yoghurt, but if you can make paneer you can make cream cheese - or rather [an easy form of ricotta] (https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/nov/14/homemade-ricotta-recipe-anna-jones-modern-cook) , which is a ...


4

You're right in that most of the tofu that we see in supermarkets are the white, super-bland type...the only variation is in softness. If you're a vegetarian, you probably know where to find other kinds that have been baked, marinated, etc. I really love tofu and one of my favorite kind is a densely packed tofu called "dofu-gan", literally translated as "...


4

A lot depends on what kind of cheese you are making. I will assume that you are making a standard, medium-firm, rennet-set cheese. I have had the most success adding seasonings and herbs with the salt. That is- after the curd has set, been cut, and drained but before it has been pressed at all. Work in the salt and any other flavors before placing the ...


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