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62

You have been lied to. I wouldn't call those things at the top of the page cheese, let alone cheddar. I'm not trying to be dismissive of your situation or culture, merely dismaying that British heritage has been misappropriated so poorly. You are not the first person I've met who's had a strong first reaction to real cheese. Kraft slices might technically ...


36

Cheese is not made from "rotten" milk, let me clarify that. Rotting is an uncontrolled process in which bacteria, molds and other life forms colonize milk, eat it, release waste into it and die. The resulting, rather unpredictable, crud we call rotten (or more precisely spoiled) milk. Most cheese is the product of highly controlled action by bacteria that ...


34

The rind of Brie is Penicillium Camemberti it's a completely harmless fungus which gives brie its taste. You can eat it, or not, up to you: you are supposed to. If it smells very strongly of ammonia the cheese is just a bit too ripe but it won't do you any harm.


32

It's simple; Americanized Chinese food rarely contains cheese because Chinese food rarely contains cheese. As many as 90% of Chinese people are, to some degree, lactose intolerant. Dairy is simply not a large part of Chinese food culture. Dairy is growing as a business in China. However, since dairy makes most Chinese sick, I imagine the dairy industry will ...


31

There are dozens if not hundreds of kinds of cheese in the world. Several kinds of non-shelf-stable cheese do not contain any added salt, just the natural salt content of the milk. Quark is a prominent example, paneer can also be made without salt. Of course paneer will reflect the taste of the acid that was used, for example lemon juice - it is up to you ...


28

You're right that the smaller pieces of cheese will melt faster than a whole block when added to a sauce. The main advantage to shredding or grating cheese is that you create smaller pieces of uniform size, and often smaller than can be achieved just by crumbling (at least when working with harder cheeses). The smaller the pieces the faster they melt, and ...


27

If you bought a good cheddar, the white spots are most likely tyrosine crystals. They build up in the cheese during the aging process, and they are a very desirable feature which gives the cheese much more taste and character. Well aged cheese has some acid and bitter notes, but mostly umami. It also has lots of cheesy aroma, which smells distinctly like ...


27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


25

I've never used ricotta or any soft cheese on my lasagne - I wonder if it is an Italian American convention. I use bechamel sauce, mozarella and parmesan, and it works very well.


20

To quote On Food and Cooking (Harold McGee), page 63, about crystals in Cheddar: In aged Cheddar, there are often crystals of calcium lactate, formed when ripening bacteria convert the usual form of lactic acid into its less soluble mirror ("D") image. In blue cheeses: The white crystals often visible against the blue mold of a Roquefort, ...


20

It is designed for the likes of hard cheeses, nutmeg, or zesting lemon and orange skin. As you mentioned, a lot of what you want to grate or zest gets stuck between the puckers and it clogs easily. I would really recommend getting a micro plane as it gives the same fine result without becoming clogged.


19

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


18

Continuing to age a "nice" block of Parmesan is not going to do anything for you. It has already aged for over year and has changed pretty much all it's going to. Similarly aging cheap, canned, Parmesan-like product that is aged only a month to cut costs will also not be good because it has too much surface area and will oxidize. It isn't very good to start ...


18

Three factors influence how well cheese melts: The amount of moisture, The amount of fat, How it was set. The meltiest cheeses have a lot of moisture and fat and were set with rennet and not acid. Both moisture and fat leave space between the casein proteins that allows them to move. Otherwise they are packed together and don't flow as well. Aged cheeses ...


15

One simple option is to shred the cheese. The heat moves from the surface of the pancake into the cheese - so a thick slice has to melt all at once, and from the bottom up, and it may not melt in time. Grated or shredded cheese has a lot more surface area, and warms quicker, and traps heat in the air between the shreds, and so will melt much quicker than ...


14

Milder cheddars are for melting. They get used in things such as grilled cheese sandwiches, grating into chili, nachos, or in quesadillas. In these uses, they don't need the full-bodied flavor of a sharp cheddar, but they do need to melt down into soft, gooey, creamy deliciousness. Sharper cheddars are for flavor. I commonly see them in sandwiches, ...


14

You can use small amounts of cheddar mixed with the other cheeses. But you'd be disappointed in the results if you tried to use it as the main or only cheese on the pizza. Cheddar cheese doesn't tolerate sustained, high heat as well as some other cheeses. It can scorch, which tastes and smells bad, and/or the fats can separate from the solids as a yellowish ...


14

The 4th version you gave is optimal from a chemistry standpoint; the process of using heat to melt a soft fat and dissolve a powder into a liquid by stirring is going to be at it's most efficient when the ingredients can fully interact with each other without all that pasta in the way. It seems the main issue at hand here is the 10-15 minute wait for ...


13

Gorgonzola, like any other blue cheese, is supposed to have mold. It should have blue mold radiating from "veins" through the middle, like so: Normally this pre-existing mold actually helps prevent other molds from growing, but if you see more than one type of mold (especially a different colour like green or black), then you should throw it out, because it ...


12

You may be able to find vegetarian Grana Padano style cheese, but I don't think you will find the real thing in vegetarian form. This is because the making of Grana Padano is still a traditional process and true GP cheese is only produced in certain regions of Italy. It in fact has P.D.O. (Protected Designation of Origin) status, which means that only those ...


12

According to the nutritional information posted on their website Domino's uses a blend of Mozzarella, American, Cheddar, Feta, Parmesan, and Provolone Cheeses. Somebody, apparently, with similar concerns asked Domino's and received this response: excerpt from letter, emphasis added: Domino's Pizza Diced Cheese for Pizza is a specially produced cheese ...


12

Yes, you can freeze parmesan cheese. Even without freezing, Parmesan is very durable since the low water and high salt content prevents mould from growing. The younger varieties may be more prone to mould growth (having a higher water content), but I've kept ripe Parmesan (30-36 months) for at least a year in the fridge without problems (and it would ...


12

I know it seems that mac 'n cheese should be a simple thing for a beginner cook to make. It isn't. Without a solid recipe, even experienced cooks can royally screw up mac 'n cheese. Generally it starts with a bechamel, also known as a white sauce. You're right, that starts with a roux which requires flour, or at least some kind of starch. Once you've got a ...


11

Try heating a couple table spoons of butter with some flour in a pot for a couple of minutes stirring with a wooden spoon then add enough hot milk to make the mixture smooth. Melting the grated cheese in flour prevents the oils from separating and the proteins from curdling. (edit) If you want to search for a recipe, a Béchamel sauce with grated cheese ...


11

A common replacement for Parmesan among vegans is to use a combination of kelp powder, nutritional yeast, and ground sesame seeds and walnuts, and salt. It works in about anything that won't require the cheese to melt. The kelp and nutritional yeast provide umami, the seeds and nuts provide a nutty flavor and some fat, and the salt... well, adds the missing ...


11

You haven't seen a lot of waxed cheese, or you've only seen a few specific ones. I can easily find (and have frequently eaten) green, black, and yellow ones, though the yellow in some cases is more of a clear wax. Other colors are possible though the range may be somewhat limited by having the cheese wax be non-toxic (generally felt to be a good idea.) One ...


10

Last summer was a long time ago. The National Center for Food Preservation has this to say about herbs in oil: Oils may be flavored with herbs if they are made up for fresh use, stored in the refrigerator and used within 2 to 3 days. There are no canning recommendations. ... Pesto is an uncooked seasoning mixture of herbs, usually including fresh basil, ...


10

Grana padano and pecorino romano are two other very savory, hard grating cheeses that work well on pasta. They taste a bit different than Parmigiano-Reggiano, but are quite good in their own right and often less expensive. You can also look at parmesan type cheeses that are not actually Parmigiano-Reggiano. For example, Whole Foods often has one from ...


10

You can learn a lot from the rind of a cheese. http://cheese.about.com/od/howcheeseismade/tp/cheese_rinds.htm There are three types of rind: Bloomy, washed, and natural. While I don't think it is technically a rind I would also list waxed as a category. Bloomy rinds are formed when molds and such that grew during the cheese aging are smashed flat. Usually ...


10

Just speculation: Since feta is a brined cheese (and can have up to 56% moisture content), and is already inherent salty, when melted and in direct heat, a lot of the water content evaporates, essentially concentrating the taste.


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