27

Couldn't I just use a lower temperature setting? No, you can't. Ovens are very bad at keeping a constant temperature. Not only is the oven thermostat usually off, it also cycles around its mean temperature a lot. So your food is subjected to constantly changing temperature. If you were to set your oven to 100C, you 1) won't get really 100C, and 2) won't ...


23

Many beginners in the kitchen get advice along the lines of “you can play around with cooking, but baking recipes shouldn’t be changed or you risk failure” or something similar. This is only partially true. Whenever you consider substitutions, you need to consider what the purpose of the given ingredient is. This will help in finding the answer to the “can ...


17

Don't freeze it. I tried that. The ice crystals that form at the lower temperature make the cheesecake texture awful and can cause cracks. However, people will eat warm cheesecake so just chill it in fridge for whatever amount of time you do have.


14

The water bath is doing exactly what it should. Most recipes are designed to make your cheesecake rise as little as possible. Baking a cheesecake is kind of like baking a souffle, except instead of encouraging rise, you combat it. Cheesecake doesn't have the structure to sustain rising. Cream cheese can't hold the air, so when it rises, it eventually ...


13

I can't say I've browsed through dozens and dozens of no-bake cheesecake recipes but the ones I've looked relied on the ingredients being whipped (usually cream) or gelatin to maintain their shape. Mousse style no-bake cheesecakes use a whipped mixture of gelatin and some milk product that gives the foamy texture. All no-bake cheesecake recipes (that I've ...


11

You are creating a bain-marie. It is used to gently heat the food and to stop the food scorching or boiling. When used for custards it stops them curdling. For cheesecakes the technique is used to stop the centre cracking.


11

You are thinking of jelly like actual jelly in a can: Sweetened fruit juice thickened with pectin. While some bakeries use special pectin to make glazes (look at LM pectins) most jelly fillings and glazes are made with starch. In the US, usually corn starch. Jelly donut filling is like canned pie filling: a sugar syrup that is thickened with starch. This ...


11

Maybe not an answer. I'd try to collect as much NY Cheesecake recipes as possible and see what are the common parts and what variations there are between them. In one of your example, recipes I've looked at are quite liberal in what can be used as crust. For example, this recipe suggests "...graham cracker, digestive biscuits, or vanilla wafer crumbs..." ...


9

The purpose of the water is to cook the custard slowly- essentially poaching it. It takes out some insurance against it overheating and breaking. Suspending the cheesecake over the water would not have the same effect- steam can get hotter than the curdling temperature of eggs. It would be a thermal mass that might even out some temperature variation in ...


8

Perhaps you're looking for the soufflé cheesecake, which has a moderate amount of flour in it. This style is also popular in Japan. The other style popular in Japan is the "rare cheesecake", which is set with gelatin instead of being baked. I think this is probably denser than what you're referring to, so I left it out of my first edit, but worth ...


8

A cheesecake doesn't need a hard base, or any base at all. The cheese part of cheesecake is sticky and will stick to a pan, although there's ways to get around that. A base (whether spongy or hard) also gives a texture and flavor contrast which many people find works well for them. It's just tradition really, you can do what you want with it, I've seen ...


8

Cheesecake is essentially a baked custard with that substitutes cream cheese (and often some sour cream) for the dairy ingredient. After all, a basic custard recipe is just milk, sugar, and eggs with some kind of flavoring added. The cheese is the thing that gives cheesecake it's distinctive texture. Substituting cream and corn starch is going to end up with ...


7

I wouldn't freeze it, especially if you're planning to serve it at a party (and thus wouldn't want to risk a failed experiment). Likely, the outside of the cheesecake would freeze but the center would remain warm. If you haven't made the cheesecake yet, you could try making small individual-sized cheesecakes (in muffin tins, perhaps). If it's already been ...


7

While you could use it, it would likely affect the finished product. As a substitute in baking, when the recipe calls for granulated sugar, powdered sugar is not always suitable. And, although it is granulated sugar which has been processed into powder, cornstarch has also been added to prevent clumping. With sugar, the size of a granule determines how ...


7

Since the recipe call for sweet riesling, I'd replace the wine with white grape juice.


6

My recommended solutions, in order of preference: Simply don't use a springform pan at all with a water bath. It's just not worth the trouble. Use a regular round cake pan for your cheesecake instead. Put parchment into the cake pan for easy removal. You'll just need to become comfortable with inverting the finished cheesecake to get it out, remove the ...


6

The best way to prevent cracking is to use a water bath. It will give you consistently perfect results every time. The payoff is worth the extra effort. A cheesecake is a baked custard and controlling the temperature is an important component in uniform cooking. Especially in a thick cheesecake, it is hard to finish cooking the center without the perimeter ...


6

I hope I am not making a wrong assumption here. But German quark is a soft cheese with somewhat creamy consistency which is made from a yogurt variety (or at least a cultured milk variety) . If "yoghurt cheese" is similar to quark in the way I think it is, you are probably better off not making a substitution, but use a recipe which was made for quark (or ...


6

It depends on the pan. If you assemble your pan and put some water in it, does the water leak out? If not, you're certainly fine. If it leaks slowly, then you're probably fine (but put some foil under it when you bake it). If it leaks quickly, then you've got a problem.


6

Given the context, I would say that this means to place in the freezer for one hour. Otherwise, if the author wanted you to place it in the refrigerator, the recipe would state "refrigerate."


5

In my experience, if I use a cheese like Philadelphia, it will have a more cheesy tang, whereas using Mascarpone has a smoother creamier taste. I also find that using higher fat creams will give a more creamy taste, as opposed to a lighter cream and particularly sour cream, which will add to the tang. I've actually just made a very creamy tasting ...


5

The water bath for a cheesecake is to control the temperature of the thick custard in the springform pan (cheesecake is technically a custard) - you don't need to worry about the moisture of the oven in the absence of a water bath. The equivalency you stated of your pan volumes is a problem, though. The two pans are not as comparable as your volumes ...


5

I have to disagree with Sobachatina in this case: the thermal mass is not the sole purpose of the water bath. Cheesecakes are prone to cracking, because the moisture of the outer layer of the filling evaporates. They don't just form a skin the way a standard custard would, they get dry enough to crack later. So, if you just suspend the cheesecake, you get ...


5

put your springform pan in a slow cooker liner or a Reynold's turkey bag. Both are made to withstand heat and work well.


5

No, you do not need a springform pan. I make both savory and sweet cheesecakes all the time. You also don't always need a water bath, or a crust. Alton Brown's cooking method is probably one of the best, just a regular pan, in a water bath, or without, cook at 225-250 for 1 hour, then turn off the oven and let the cheesecake sit in it for another hour. Then ...


5

A few cycles each in the fridge and freezer might help, if you're careful, and lucky. You should probably still have a back-up plan, if it doesn't work. and be prepared to keep the cheesecake for yourself if it doesn't end up quite right. You will want to avoid freezing the cheesecake - as Ammnar Naseer said, that can affect the texture negatively because ...


5

There are plenty of recipes that do. You don't want your added ingredients to be too wet, and if they're strongly coloured the colour is likely to bleed into the mix whatever you do (e.g. blueberries). The results will be different for baked cheesecakes and chilled cheesecakes, but in both cases it can work. I suggest you keep trying to find a recipe that ...


5

Sure you can. Just blitz the cookies in a food processor, and add a stream of melted butter until you can form the crust into a ball in your hand. Then just press the cookie mixture into the pan you want to bake the cheesecake in.


5

I haven't actually tried this on a cheesecake specifically but, when I need a spreadable jelly, I'll heat it in a pot until it goes back to being a runny liquid. (It's original state before the starch/pectin cooled and gelatinized.) Let it cool slightly then pour it over whatever you want to cover.


5

Cream cheese is a distinct product, with a flavour and texture of its own. I don't think you'd get the right texture by crumbling paneer into yoghurt, but if you can make paneer you can make cream cheese - or rather [an easy form of ricotta] (https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/nov/14/homemade-ricotta-recipe-anna-jones-modern-cook) , which is a ...


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