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1

Cheesecake "blooms" overnight or at least 8 hours in the refrigerator. It becomes thicker and has that cheesecake thickness with tiny pockets of air that make it so heavenly and creamy. I have never been able to get that quality without letting it sit for a long time in the refrigerator. Fast cooling just doesn't let it set and bloom.


23

Many beginners in the kitchen get advice along the lines of “you can play around with cooking, but baking recipes shouldn’t be changed or you risk failure” or something similar. This is only partially true. Whenever you consider substitutions, you need to consider what the purpose of the given ingredient is. This will help in finding the answer to the “can ...


2

Before you start separating your pie, you need to be sure that your fillings all need the same baking time and temperature. If they are from the same basic recipe and just have some extra flavors, you should be ok, if they are smaller amounts of different recipes, check the instructions carefully or ideally, make them as full pies once and note the actual ...


11

Maybe not an answer. I'd try to collect as much NY Cheesecake recipes as possible and see what are the common parts and what variations there are between them. In one of your example, recipes I've looked at are quite liberal in what can be used as crust. For example, this recipe suggests "...graham cracker, digestive biscuits, or vanilla wafer crumbs..." ...


13

The water bath is doing exactly what it should. Most recipes are designed to make your cheesecake rise as little as possible. Baking a cheesecake is kind of like baking a souffle, except instead of encouraging rise, you combat it. Cheesecake doesn't have the structure to sustain rising. Cream cheese can't hold the air, so when it rises, it eventually ...


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