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84

I would say no. The function of the egg in the cake is to go in raw, mix with the other stuff, and once the raw egg has penetrated and coated the other ingredients thoroughly, bind it all together with that bouncy, sticky solidified eggy property which comes into existence as the egg cooks. Cooking the egg first all by itself, then adding to a cake would ...


79

Apart from water, rice is mainly made from starch. Starch is initially packed in a crystalline structure that is not soluble. However if you soak it for long enough or expose it to heat, the starch slowly 'unpacks' and binds with water, resulting in a soluble compound. This is called starch gelatinization, and is what you are aiming for when you soak your ...


49

Crustaceans like shrimp, lobsters, crabs and crayfish have a pigment called astaxanthin in their shells. Astaxanthin belongs to the terpines class of chemicals of which the carotenoid ¹ class is a subdivision and, in a marine environment, gets produced by an algae that is subsequently consumed by crustaceans (and other animals like salmon, red trout, red ...


33

I am answering this question, but I am not going to accept this answer, at least not without further research and/or experimentation and editing this answer to reflect that. I am hoping that somebody with a greater knowledge of chemistry and the nature of brining can add to or even credibly contradict the science of what I am saying here. My conclusions are ...


30

Yes, your butter contains water - which is perfectly normal. While oil is 100% fat, butter is only around 80%1 fat plus some protein and ca. 15% water. Regarding your question where the water comes from - If you look at how butter is made, it becomes obvious that the water was there from the beginning: You start with cow's milk, which has a natural fat ...


26

Welcome to the world of urban legends and old wives' tales. Handmade mayonnaise can be a fickle thing to create if you don't work within the laws of physics and chemistry and don't achieve the desired emulsion. So like with other tricky processes, many "rules" have developed, that are more myth than method. (I was even told once to "always stir counter-...


22

It is possible, but only if you do not want it to act as glue. are the chemical processes of boiling an egg and cooking it inside the dough fundamentally different? As mentioned in earlier answers - no, but the point is that you need these processes during baking. One notable exception is shortcrust pastry You can use boiled egg to bake it. It is meant ...


21

Summary for the Quick Reader Only the shape and size of the grains really makes a difference. Otherwise, salt is salt. What makes a difference between salts? There are only two real differentiators between different types of salt (assuming the product is essentially just salt, and not a seasoning blend): The mineral or other impurities resulting from ...


21

Arsenic reduction To add to what @ShiftyThomas said Now, some ways of cooking rice reduce arsenic levels more than others. We carried out some tests with Prof Meharg and found the best technique is to soak the rice overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio. That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two ...


19

Water treatment often uses chlorine or chloramine to kill germs or algae. If you are smelling it it's more likely to be Chloramine than Chlorine. Chlorine will dissipate from water over time naturally, but boiling for 20 minute will drive it out. Chloramine will also dissipate naturally, but in a much longer time frame, and would take over a day to boil out. ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


16

What happens to bread when it is done Yes, there is something particular what happens at a temperature in the mid-90s. Not all details of it are proven, but the major outline is, and the hypotheses about the details are solid enough to make it into textbooks. Starch is contained in tiny granules, a few micrometers in diameter. When heated in the ...


15

Why Alcohol? Alcohol is used for extracts because the flavor compounds (plant oils) you are trying to extract do not easily dissolve in water. Alcohol (typically bourbon or vodka) will do the trick. Make sure you use +80 proof because it also acts as a preservative. Making Mint Extract To make an extract, tear up or coarsely chop and bruise washed mint ...


15

The main enemy of oil is oxidation, which is the reaction of the constituent molecules with oxygen. How fast oxidation occurs will depend on the type of oil you consider. For example, unsaturated fat oxidizes faster than saturated. Therefore oils with higher content of unsaturated fat tend to oxide faster. Since oxidation is a reaction, it changes the ...


14

Breads get their structure from glutens--a type of protein formed by the combination of glutenin with gliaten. Kneading and resting the dough helps the formation of glutens--I assume by shifting glutenin and gliatin molecules around, this increases the odds of bindings occurring. Oils can bind to glutenin and gliatin and inhibit these reactions, so fats--...


14

Leavening is rising by any means, so baking soda and baking powder (chemical leaveners) both apply here, as does yeast (fermentation). Chemical leaveners like baking soda and powder work by mixing an acid (varies, depending on the recipe) and base (usually baking soda in some form) to produce carbon dioxide gas. Fermentation is the process of yeast ...


13

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


12

You've partially answered your own question: When wrapped in foil, the water contained naturally in the ingredients will re-moisturise the banana bread. a. To reduce: don't wrap it leave it in the oven to cool down with the oven slightly open so that most of the moisture can escape b. to enhance: make a dome of tin foil above it before putting it in the ...


11

From UC Davis: Question: Why did my garlic turn blue? Answer: Garlic contains anthocyanins, water-soluble pigments that can turn blue or purple under acidic conditions. This is a variable phenomenon that is more pronounced for immature garlic but can differ among cloves within a single head of garlic. If you grow your own garlic, be sure to mature it at ...


11

The exact number will depend on what exactly your lye is composed of. Lye usually refers to either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). For the purposes of the calculations I'm going to assume that it is sodium hydroxide. Because molecules are really tiny things, chemists use larger units to count them, namely the mole. One mole of a ...


11

From the opening of the Wikipedia article on curcumin you presumably saw: Curcumin is a bright yellow chemical produced by some plants. It is the principal curcuminoid of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae). (emphasis mine) As for the Curcuma genus: The name comes from the Sanskrit kuṅkuma, referring to turmeric. ...


10

This is not yogurt per definition, you are making a fresh cheese. You can actually use other types of milk for such a cheese, but the mouthfeel and taste will be very different and won't be as similar to yogurt. There is a large class of acid-curdled cheeses, including paneer, tvorog, quark and many others. I don't know if yours has a specific name. I know ...


10

This seems to be a myth based on the idea that wine can be 'bruised' by popping the cork or handling the bottle roughly. 'Dr Vinny', Wine Spectator Magazine's advice expert, has this to say on the subject: Someone asked whether or not making a cork "pop" when you pull it will bruise the wine. Others have also asked about bruising in relation to decanting....


10

If your are dealing with chloramine, a trick I've used in homebrewing is to add powdered ascorbic acid (vitamin c) while heating the water up to around 170 for 15 minutes or so. This will pull the chloramine out of solution and you'll end up with some particulate solid residue on the bottom of the pot from the reaction, so you'd probably want to decant the ...


10

The scum on the top of the tea is due to hard water (ie calcium carbonate) deposits combining with the tea and reacting with oxygen, this article has some more details if you are looking for them. I live in a hard water area and I use brita filters to get rid of some of the hardness, I know when the filter needs changing when the hard water scum comes back.


10

Milk's natural pH is about 6.5, just slightly acidic. If it approaches a pH of 5.5, the casein proteins lose their negative charge and the micelles no longer repel each other, meaning they start to gather in small clusters. At around pH 4.6, the scattered proteins bond to each other again and begin to curdle. Though this kind of curdling is not the same as ...


9

Microbes need available water to grow, and sugar reduces the availability of water to them. In addition, spread as a thin layer on cake, water evaporates (further reducing water availability). You can find out more about factors influencing microbial growth in the FDA's Bad Bug Book. As the book notes, generally, you can only know from experiment if a ...


9

Actually it is neither filler nor binder, but moisture retainer. Breadcrumbs in your ground meat will absorb much of the natural juices during cooking and then will release that moisture back into the meat as it rests resulting in a 'juicier' burger, meatball or meatloaf.


9

I was unable to find information that might tell what happened to your dish, but found some extremely interesting and detailed sources of information on collagen and gelatin which I think are worth sharing. I did find that the pH is unlikely to be the major contributing factor, as there are both acid and alkaline processes for gelatin formation--see the ...


9

It could be eugenol that causes the numbing sensation you experience. Eugenol is common to cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, basil and bay leaf and is used in anesthetics & analgesics, among other things.


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