83

I would say no. The function of the egg in the cake is to go in raw, mix with the other stuff, and once the raw egg has penetrated and coated the other ingredients thoroughly, bind it all together with that bouncy, sticky solidified eggy property which comes into existence as the egg cooks. Cooking the egg first all by itself, then adding to a cake would ...


80

Apart from water, rice is mainly made from starch. Starch is initially packed in a crystalline structure that is not soluble. However if you soak it for long enough or expose it to heat, the starch slowly 'unpacks' and binds with water, resulting in a soluble compound. This is called starch gelatinization, and is what you are aiming for when you soak your ...


49

Crustaceans like shrimp, lobsters, crabs and crayfish have a pigment called astaxanthin in their shells. Astaxanthin belongs to the terpines class of chemicals of which the carotenoid ¹ class is a subdivision and, in a marine environment, gets produced by an algae that is subsequently consumed by crustaceans (and other animals like salmon, red trout, red ...


35

I am answering this question, but I am not going to accept this answer, at least not without further research and/or experimentation and editing this answer to reflect that. I am hoping that somebody with a greater knowledge of chemistry and the nature of brining can add to or even credibly contradict the science of what I am saying here. My conclusions are ...


34

It doesn't actually dissolve. It disperses (easily seen as some will eventually settle out). The distinction is important, as dissolving could be solved by time or heat. A few things may help when mixing with water (or milk): Make a paste with the powder and a little water, then dilute (this is what I do for protein shakes) Put a little water in the bottle. ...


30

Yes, your butter contains water - which is perfectly normal. While oil is 100% fat, butter is only around 80%1 fat plus some protein and ca. 15% water. Regarding your question where the water comes from - If you look at how butter is made, it becomes obvious that the water was there from the beginning: You start with cow's milk, which has a natural fat ...


27

It is a chemical quality of the oil called "iodine number". There is nothing you can do about it, it is as inherent in the oil as its smoke point. Oils with a low iodine number create hard polymers, and oils with a high iodine number create soft, sticky polymers. If you want a hard, nonstick surface on the pan, choose the right oil. Coconut oil, Palm oil ...


26

Welcome to the world of urban legends and old wives' tales. Handmade mayonnaise can be a fickle thing to create if you don't work within the laws of physics and chemistry and don't achieve the desired emulsion. So like with other tricky processes, many "rules" have developed, that are more myth than method. (I was even told once to "always stir counter-...


22

It is possible, but only if you do not want it to act as glue. are the chemical processes of boiling an egg and cooking it inside the dough fundamentally different? As mentioned in earlier answers - no, but the point is that you need these processes during baking. One notable exception is shortcrust pastry You can use boiled egg to bake it. It is meant ...


22

Chocolate is a solid at room temperature, strawberry puree is not, so I strongly doubt that the strawberry would result in a foam. The reason chocolate would form a solid foam is that it is largely composed of a two substances - sugar and fat. Together with the air these can form a solid of fats (similar to whipped cream) with microscopic sugar crystals ...


20

Arsenic reduction To add to what @ShiftyThomas said Now, some ways of cooking rice reduce arsenic levels more than others. We carried out some tests with Prof Meharg and found the best technique is to soak the rice overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio. That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two ...


19

Water treatment often uses chlorine or chloramine to kill germs or algae. If you are smelling it it's more likely to be Chloramine than Chlorine. Chlorine will dissipate from water over time naturally, but boiling for 20 minute will drive it out. Chloramine will also dissipate naturally, but in a much longer time frame, and would take over a day to boil out. ...


17

To answer your question as stated: no, there is no way to dilute oil, at least not in a sense that would be helpful for your situation. In cooking, there are basically only three edible liquids: water, oil and alcohol. Everything else is a mixture based on one or more of these. This view of things is terribly oversimplified, but it provides us with a good ...


16

What happens to bread when it is done Yes, there is something particular what happens at a temperature in the mid-90s. Not all details of it are proven, but the major outline is, and the hypotheses about the details are solid enough to make it into textbooks. Starch is contained in tiny granules, a few micrometers in diameter. When heated in the ...


16

There is nothing to explain here - the claim is simply wrong. You can certainly put bread in custard and subject it to heat. It is traditionally done in French toast, for example. I could even buy that under some circumstances, you won't notice that you are chewing on what used to be bread - the inside of a French toast is quite soft, and if you don't know ...


16

The beating of a liquid to a foam is not unique to a chocolate-and-water mixture. Neither is it something that works with any random liquid. What you need is an emulsion or a colloid which contains something that can hold the bubbles of the foam, and has the right proportion of that "something" to the liquid part has the right particle/droplet ...


15

Leavening is rising by any means, so baking soda and baking powder (chemical leaveners) both apply here, as does yeast (fermentation). Chemical leaveners like baking soda and powder work by mixing an acid (varies, depending on the recipe) and base (usually baking soda in some form) to produce carbon dioxide gas. Fermentation is the process of yeast ...


15

The main enemy of oil is oxidation, which is the reaction of the constituent molecules with oxygen. How fast oxidation occurs will depend on the type of oil you consider. For example, unsaturated fat oxidizes faster than saturated. Therefore oils with higher content of unsaturated fat tend to oxide faster. Since oxidation is a reaction, it changes the ...


14

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


14

It seems like there are 3 sub-questions to this question: Physical level Adding liquid in the pan creates steam, a moist, hot gas which is able to move between the solids of the fond and lift the fond from the bottom of the pan. Chemical level The majority of the relevant food molecules in the fond, created from the Maillard reaction and caramelization, are ...


13

I invented a method to facilitate dissolving of protein powder shakes for an Innocentive contest. It worked pretty well but I did not win so there must be a better method out there. The idea is that the powder would rather stay with powder than move off into the water - it is hydrophobic to some degree. I mixed the powder with a small amount of baking soda ...


12

There's no point in getting pure capsaicin and diluting it yourself when you can buy capsaicin in just about any strength you want with all the work done for you. If you want something truly, painfully hot then get capsaicin 1 mil and then measure it into your dishes with an eye dropper. Be real careful with it, use gloves and don't sniff it, even at 1M it ...


12

The scum on the top of the tea is due to hard water (ie calcium carbonate) deposits combining with the tea and reacting with oxygen, this article has some more details if you are looking for them. I live in a hard water area and I use brita filters to get rid of some of the hardness, I know when the filter needs changing when the hard water scum comes back.


12

You've partially answered your own question: When wrapped in foil, the water contained naturally in the ingredients will re-moisturise the banana bread. a. To reduce: don't wrap it leave it in the oven to cool down with the oven slightly open so that most of the moisture can escape b. to enhance: make a dome of tin foil above it before putting it in the ...


12

No, you cannot use normal washing soda for cooking because you cannot count on the purity of the product. Even if the chemical formula is identical, the standards for manufacturing chemicals intended for human consumption are considerably higher than those for cleaning. You can, however, purchase food-grade sodium carbonate as a food additive from a variety ...


11

Update: It's been a few years but there now is a definite answer to this question. @PegDat is correct. The Tomatoes Oxidize when they are exposed to air and turn orange. This was proved using an experiment with vacuum blender blending tomatoes with air and with most of the air pumped out. When you reduce the air in the blender chamber, the ...


11

The exact number will depend on what exactly your lye is composed of. Lye usually refers to either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). For the purposes of the calculations I'm going to assume that it is sodium hydroxide. Because molecules are really tiny things, chemists use larger units to count them, namely the mole. One mole of a ...


11

From the opening of the Wikipedia article on curcumin you presumably saw: Curcumin is a bright yellow chemical produced by some plants. It is the principal curcuminoid of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae). (emphasis mine) As for the Curcuma genus: The name comes from the Sanskrit kuṅkuma, referring to turmeric. ...


10

Note: This answer goes in a bit more detail than necessary to answer the question. If you truly only care about the hydration, please only read "Water/flour ratio" and "Flavor of the bread". I have added the other information as well since the effects are similar to that of a change in hydration. I've frequently baked (about once to twice a week) with ...


10

Those look like air pockets - you're using an unusual whisk, perhaps it can't get enough "bite" on the stainless steel bowl to pop them, whereas the plastic bowl's texture offers enough resistance. I'd try it with a balloon whisk rather than a spiral whisk, and see if that helps. Here's a breakdown on whisks and their uses from Craftsy.


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