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You could experiment with decreasing the sugar...higher sugar means quicker melting. However, if you want to eliminate all melting, you could try making a fluid gel using low acyl gellan (typically 0.5% to 1.25%...so, it doesn't take much). Then freeze that. It is more freeze/thaw stable than agar.


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Yeast doesn't really give you an alcoholic taste in bread. Little yeast activity doesn't give you much aroma, and high yeast activity gives you a bread-typical aroma based around thiols and even hints of ammonia. If you leave your dough to ferment until you can smell alcohol in it, it is no longer suitable for baking. As to why you are sensing something ...


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Yeast naturally creates alcohol from the sugars (gluten) found in bread flour. However, this probably won't be enough to leave an 'alcohol' taste, depending on the amount of yeast used and the amount of time the dough is left to leaven. You'll find that sourdough bread has more of that alcohol taste (and is also a lot fluffier) than a quick 2-hour no-knead ...


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There is an "easy" way to do this if you are drinking somewhere that uses fluid ounces instead of mL. I call it the "divide by 60" method. A US "standard drink" is 12 fl oz of 5%. Multiplying 12 * 0.05 gives us 0.6 fl oz of alcohol as a "standard drink". However, since we are going to be using % alcohol over and over, I find it easiest to not do the ...


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The question provided a link to "How to determine the alcohol content of a mixed-drink?", so I'll assume you want a simpler, easier to understand answer. Consider some common drinks: 12 US fl.oz. (355 mL) bottle of 5% beer = 355×5/100 = 17.75 mL alcohol. 1½ US fl.oz (44.4 mL) shot of 40% bourbon = 44.4×40/100 = 17.76 mL alcohol. 5 US fl.oz (148 mL) glass ...


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It is easier to define the standard drink by volume as you won't have to switch between concentrations by volume (as is normal in most drinks) and grams. This is probably where your recollection of moles comes in as somewhere in this morass of units they get involved. 14 grams of alcohol is 17.7 ml so 30% alcohol (many spirits) to get to a 100% you need ...


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This is a rather complicated issue, so I will answer it in steps. Only oil and water This is not something that is usually done in the kitchen, since the emulsion is not stable. But it is useful to consider this simplest version first before going on to the more complex ones. Let's assume that all you are mixing is water, oil, and maybe a bit of citric or ...


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One factor not mentioned yet is when emulsifying make sure all the ingredients have sat at the same temperature for a few hours first as it enables all the chemical reactions to occur more evenly.


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Fatty acids are not the emulsifiers here. Long chain fatty acids are excellent for emulsification, if they are deprotonated. But then they would be called “fatty acid salts”, and their flavor would be soapy - bitter. If they're neutral fatty acids, they're not ionized enough to retain a sphere of water around the micelle, and block aggregation of the ...


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