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I don't know about turning the heat up and your observation, but seeing more "steam" when turning the heat down or off is often wondered about. It was asked and answered on the physics stack exchange. Basically, since "steam" is transparent water vapor, what you are seeing when the cooling happens is a cloud of condensed water vapor. The issue with the ...


2

It's hard to say without seeing it, but I suggest that this phenomenon happening when you turn up or down the gas may be caused by your arm reaching out in the vicinity of the pot to turn the knob. The air above the pot should be saturated with water vapor at a higher temperature. Motion nearby will create eddy currents that carry that moist air to where ...


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Properties baking potash would have in a recipe aside from the leavening effect: 1 tsp of baking soda (NaHCO3) weighs about 4.8 grams. It would require 7.89 grams of potassium carbonate (K2CO3) to provide equivalent leavening power (in terms of volume of CO2 produced). However, since it is "dibasic", it must react with twice as much acid to be fully ...


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I've never heard of any preservative effect of potash, the reason it is still used in traditional recipes is the ashy flavor it imparts. That smokiness is not to everyone's taste, baking soda is a perfectly good substitute if you prefer the end result. You can refrigerate baking soda leavened cookie dough for 3-5 days without issue, it's batters where ...


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Most lactose free milk does not have the lactose removed, rather it is made by adding the enzyme lactase to milk. Lactase breaks down the lactose into simple sugars. Some milk undergoes an ultrafiltration process. In this case the lactose can be substantially reduced, but never completely eliminated. I have to assume that it is more difficult to culture ...


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It is from the wisk. If you do careful inspection at the top of the wisk you will see rust and black when you move the wires around. I just had to throw out my entire pie. I used two separate metal whips one was used in glass the other was used in a metal bowl. Both had flakes. Buy a coated whisk


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From what I've read, the answer is that the oil will be sticky when the oil is not cooked sufficiently to finish both polymerizing and the carbon deposition. This is a chemical reaction, and like any endothermic chemical reaction takes some combination of time and heat to occur. From Science of Cooking: Note 3: If highly unsaturated oils are used and ...


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