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Chia seeds can be used without soaking, but they absorb a LOT of liquid and create a gel. If this isn't accounted for in your recipe, they could cause the finished product to have an odd texture. At the very least, I'd add extra liquid to your batter and let it sit for a few minutes to check it's consistency before you use it.


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I want to know if these are the same, and if it's safe to use ground chia in these aforementioned recipes (and vice versa). The particle size may be different, and for some recipes that will be significant. I am not aware of any regulations (US, EU or other) that regulate chia labeling with regard to ground or powdered chia. I believe manufacturers can do ...


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It is possible that the seeds did not look like they had swelled. While the seed itself looks like its size stays about the same, the "swelling" really comes from the fiber soaking up liquid, forming a gelatinous "blob" around each seed pod. And how much they swell will also depend on how much liquid they're soaking in. This is a time-lapse video of chia ...


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I usually let it soak overnight, though it isn't necessary to soak that long. You should soak it till it forms a paste/gel like consistency and it would take at least 2-3 hours, though this website claims under ten minutes (time might vary depending on the batch of the seeds). You could also soak it in any juice or fruit extract as well. Additionally, you ...


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According to Pure Goodness: Chia gel can substitute for half the butter in most recipes! The food will bake the same and taste the same (or better) from the addition of the chia gel. All you need to do is divide the amount of butter or oil in half, and then use the same amount of chia gel to fill in. [...] Everything from cookies to cakes to muffins,...


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I would just like to say that you can't decide on edibility based on the plant family. For example, both potatoes, tomatoes and deadly nightshade belong to the same family. However, chia leaves can be used for herbal tea, which means they could probably also be eaten safely.


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Wikipedia says chia is a plant that belongs to the mint family. According to the wiki article the FDA generally recognizes mint as safe ยง182.10 Spices and other natural seasonings and flavorings, including mint, are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) for food uses in the United States. but the wiki article also enumerates two mint species in ...


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If your problem is that a pie with 3 cups of liquid (750 ml) was runny with 2 tbsp of corn starch and some water sucking ingredients such as potatoes, and you say it tasted like corn starch, then you probably just didn't thicken the starch. You should try cooking the original recipe correctly before deciding whether to change it to something exotic. Starch ...


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I snip my chia greens and top them on my salads. They are so easy to grow and I've had zero digestive or health issues and have been eating the leaves all Summer! They are one of the few plants that grow in this SW Florida Summer heat.


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Chia seeds have been known to harbor salmonella, and considering their high fat content, high carbohydrate content, and their physical/chemical reaction to being soaked in water, they are an ideal growing medium for any number of hazards. The USDA does not have a published opinion on the topic. The EFSA has approved them as an ingredient in all forms,...


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From my personal usage I have experienced that chia seeds works well with warm water. Warm water helps & triggers the surface of chia seeds to open-up absorbing water faster. 35C - 45C is the average permissible temperature to soak chia seeds. It has also been observed that ceramic vessels or glasswares have good insulation property they maintain the ...


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If you add water to chia seeds they swell up and exude a thick runny gel. This is far safer for you than eating them raw and having them swell up somewhere inside you eg your duodenum and burst it, or give you constipation if you do not have enough water in your stomach to do it. The lime juice may help with this process or make it taste nicer as the gel is ...


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This might be the reason that last bunch were nasty bitter: they can go rancid. I smelled them: OFF! http://www.chiaseedspot.com/do-chia-seeds-go-rancid/ I purchased from bulk and consumed just now. Yuck!!! I've NEVER had chia with any bitter chemical taste before, and now I must discard a big bag of it bought at a Smart & Final' Superstore's bulk ...


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Chia seeds will thicken. Soak over night , or if really in a hurry, pour very hot water over them and let them soak for 45 minutes. They will jell somewhat and that's OK


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