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40

This might seem silly but, . . . I use my fist. I always cover my chicken with plastic wrap to contain the mess before I pound it. You can also glove up instead/as well. I have found that punching it is just the right amount of force for the job. And the uneven surface of my knuckles acts as a meat tenderizer and breaks up the tissue just a little. (But not ...


35

Anything flat, non-breakable, and reasonably heavy would work: rubber mallet, rolling pin, flat-bottomed wooden bowl, etc. I would suggest protecting the meat and implement from one another with plastic wrap.


27

I've never been one to keep track of cooking times with meats, since it will vary wildly with meat thickness, burner strength and type, phase of the moon, etc. Edit: I forgot to answer "how to go about searing". I sear chicken like I sear beef: hard and fast. The point is to get that Maillard reaction going to add some deliciousness and texture (not to "...


22

Short answer - you are right on all counts and she's wrong. Tell her that, she'll love it. ;) The longer answer is that boiling a frozen piece of meat, especially one that is thick in the middle like chicken breast is exactly the opposite of what you want to do as you'll cook the outside but the inside will still be frozen, and boiling (as you rightly ...


21

The first issue I see is that you are over cooking your chicken breast. 20 minutes in a pressure cooker is really over doing it. Even a little over cooking dries chicken breast. Chicken breast needs to be cooked more precisely. A pressure cooker is not the correct tool for the job. So you first need to correct your initial cooking. You should get a ...


16

I found that putting chicken breasts in a ziplock bag and letting them sit in a bowl of water thaws them fairly quickly "changing the water helps too". Albet not as quickly as a microwave though however in my opinion too long on dethaw in a microwave seems to make the chicken taste off.


15

Put breast between baking paper, roll like dough with a rolling pin. If you have any spices/herbs/salt/pepper to add you can sprinkle then mid rolling as this will push them inside meat.


10

Chicken breast is so lean and bland already that I'm not sure this method would really be that much worse than a different method especially when being shredded and mixed with strong flavors. I don't think it's wasteful unless it is not eaten, but a far better way would be slow cooked and then shredded thigh meat. It is fattier, but in my opinion, a far ...


9

I think what your experiencing is the difference between our factory farmed chickens and "normal" chickens. If you do a side-by-side comparison of something like a purdue chicken and an organic free range chicken it'll taste nothing alike. Chicken, eggs, and to a certain extent beef taste immensely different (better IMO) when they're not factory farmed. Now ...


9

The truly BEST way to cook meat evenly (frozen or not) would be a "low-temp cooking" process (AKA sous vide). If you can surround the meat with water at exactly the target temperature of the meat (e.g. 60 Celsius for chicken) you don't need to worry about it getting overcooked. Most sous vide restaurants sear both sides of the meat before and/or after the ...


8

Moisture-release is not a result of the cooking process but of the quality of the chicken. Try the following experiment: Buy halal or kosher chicken breast Buy the cheapest chicken breast you can find. Now put two pans on the stove, and put the industrial chicken breast in the left pan and put the kosher/halal in the right. Ensure both pans have the ...


8

Nothing you do will be perfect but here are a few things you can do to help. When done frying dry well in a dry space. Sealed spaces will trap the moisture released by the chicken as it cools. Refrigerators are natural moist spaces as well. You will want to do this on a drying rack to prevent the chicken sitting in its own runoff juices. Use of a fan will ...


8

Freeze the breasts, then use a mandoline to make even slices. (If you have access to a deli slicer with its rotary blade, that would be even faster; however, a mandoline slicer is more typical in a home kitchen.) The freezing keeps the relatively small pieces of meat stable so they will slice more evenly. Frozen breasts slice more evenly even by hand in my ...


7

The problem is that you're using a lid. Spatter screens keep the oil mostly contained, while still allowing any moisture to escape. A lid, on the other hand, collects the moisture on the underside of the lid. When you go to lift it, the water drops back into the oil, and causes increased spattering. You're actually better off without a lid, if you don't ...


7

It sounds like you're buying a cheaper cut of meat - one that's likely been infused with water to plump and to rapidly chill the meat to a safe temperature after butchery. Look for packages that state 'air-chilled' instead.


7

Liquid naturally comes out of all meats as they cook. If you're using high heat and a frying pan, you don't really notice it because it evaporates quickly. That brown stuff you see in a frying pan after cooking meat on high heat are the evaporated juices. If you're baking them at around 350 F, you'll also notice water being released. This is amplified if ...


7

The classic method of breading ("Wiener Schnitzel") is a three-step process: flour Only a thin layer: you can add salt or spices to the flour instead of or in addition to seasoning the meat. egg Lightly beaten (not foamy); let excess drip off well. breadcrumbs Either fresh or dried, the egg helps the crumbs to adhere. Lightly pressing the crumbs to the ...


7

You could just add water instead of extra sauce. The water will cook off just as much as the sauce would have, leaving you with essentially just sauce by the end. If that's not spicy/saucy enough for you, then it means you did actually need some of that extra sauce you've been adding. Alternatively, you could try lower temperature. If it's all cooking down ...


7

Structurally it is similar to silver-skin on tenderloin and other red meat muscles, some connective tissue marking the muscle boundary. I have seen it be a little tough on older, non-broiler birds but even then not normally worth messing with, IMO. If you chunk the meat you might find spots that are thick enough to be worth removing especially near the ...


7

I do this all the time when there's a good sale on chicken ... but I start them in boiling water, then turn the pot to low and let it simmer so I don't overcook it. (and it'd be considered poaching, not parboiling) I'll then bag it up and freeze it. Although I typically also use the liquid to make stock when the chicken was bone-in. It's a convenience ...


7

Chicken breast is not suitable for making shredded meat. For that, you need collagen-rich dark meat, for example chicken thighs. If you cook your chicken breast less, as moscafj suggested, you can certainly get tasty chicken breast. For easy portioning, you can precut it into strips and keep a supply of pan-fried strips, for example. But you will never get ...


6

Most recipes say to use a slow cooker, but some say boil. Why would one be better than the other? It is better to slow simmer. As a very general rule, it is better to moist cook meat or poultry slowly. It makes for a more tender, more luscious bit of meat. Sometimes I'd rather not reinvent the wheel, so I'll just show you this from Bon Appetit to address ...


6

First, I would recommend changing how you cook the breasts -- I usually poach breasts, starting it in boiling liquid then putting on a lid, turning the heat down to low and letting it sit for an hour. Second, I'd put the breasts back into the liquid after you shred it. Usually, when you introduce so much surface area to hot meat, it lets off steam, which ...


5

According to the Douglas Baldwin pasteurisation tables for poultry a chicken breast of that thickness would be pasteurised after 55 minutes so you are well within that range. Thickness 57°C 58°C 59°C 60°C 61°C 62°C 63°C 64°C 65°C 20 mm 2¾ hr 2 hr 1¾ hr 1¼ hr 1¼ hr 55 min 50 min 45 min 40 min 25 mm 3 hr ...


5

Any kind of cooked meat or fish and most perishable foods in general are safe as long as they are fully cooked and refrigerated within 2 hours (although the quality will deteriorate rapidly with fish). If you plan to eat the leftovers twice then refrigerate two individual portions. Reheating the same item multiple times raises the risk of bacterial ...


5

While not specifically an answer to your measurement question, you might consider cooking your chicken low-temp (sous vide) to ensure optimal doneness, then just quickly deep fry for crust formation. That would guarantee safety and specific temp. for specific parts of the bird. See here, for example: http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-fried-...


5

Frying the chicken tends to set the muscle fibers by drawing moisture out. An example of this would be taking a thin (1cm) cutlet and frying it until both sides start to turn golden. It will be pretty dry and hard. Pressure cooking it on the other hand tends to soften the muscle fibers without drawing moisture in (if anything, its putting moisture in). ...


5

Breast is lean muscle. Add a ton of heat to it and it'll seize up into a dense brick that nobody wants to eat. In that vein, I'm not sure I'd put chicken breast anywhere near a pressure cooker because that's a really great way to get something to 120°C. That's about twice what you want. Ideally we want chicken to hit 63.5°C and stay there for a bit. Here's ...


5

Proteins are complex chemical forms so it depends. Let me elaborate by giving 2 extreme examples: If you boil an egg, the proteins unfold, hook into one another and therefore a liquid becomes a solid that doesn't melt again when you cool it down and there is no protein loss whatsoever. if you burn a piece of chicken breast fillet to a crisp on a barbecue ...


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