21

Gelatin and fat are different. Chill your stock. If a layer of fat solidifies at the surface, remove it. If you see no layer of solidified fat, you've probably eliminated as much as possible.


10

Fat will thicken a stock, but will not make it gelatinous. Gelling comes from collagen which comes from the bones or — in my opinion — even better from the joints. My experience is that this is easier to achieve from a cooked bird than a raw one rather than the other way around. The gelling may have locked up some of the fats, but you also may not have had ...


3

Cooked bones work fine, but depending on how they were cooked and for how long it may change how long you need to boil them to derive the maximum thickness. The ideal length of time for extracting gelatin from raw bones is about four hours. After that the gelatin starts to break down and loses its thickening power. Also, the more you can cut up the bones, ...


2

Yes, you can do it and it will work. In fact, there is a huge market for products doing exactly that. You may know them as "bouillon cubes" but they exist in versions other than cubes, such as powder or liquid. They are a combination of MSG and aromatics, usually also salt. They rarely use gelatin, since the gelatin is actually a side effect of ...


2

Any gelatin in your stock will be there whether it is warm or cold. It's just that gelatin solidifies when it cools...it will melt out when you warm it again, leaving you where you are now. You can go straight to your sauce, your stock is probably as flavorful as it will be when you are finished cooking it. Cooling prior to refrigeration is to prevent the ...


1

As it cools, the fat and water will separate into two layers, with the fat on top. If there is no/little fat layer, then there simply isn't any fat. The thickness that seems fatty is just gelatin that has set like jelly. That's a good thing as it means the stock was well made.


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