39

I notice that your recipe doesn't include any salt. That's important, because salt decreases the sensation of bitterness. Chicken contains a certain amount of salt, and I suspect that's making the difference. (The "umami" -- brothy -- taste of chicken may also decrease the sensation of bitterness, though as I understand it there's still some disagreement ...


21

Gelatin and fat are different. Chill your stock. If a layer of fat solidifies at the surface, remove it. If you see no layer of solidified fat, you've probably eliminated as much as possible.


10

Fat will thicken a stock, but will not make it gelatinous. Gelling comes from collagen which comes from the bones or — in my opinion — even better from the joints. My experience is that this is easier to achieve from a cooked bird than a raw one rather than the other way around. The gelling may have locked up some of the fats, but you also may not have had ...


9

I make veg stock overnight in a slow cooker on high with similar ingredients to you: onion, garlic, carrot, bay, peppercorns. But: celery instead of celeriac (I grow celery and often have some old tough stems and leaves which are perfect for stock), rarely parsnip or leek, and often some other herbs or veg I've got to hand. I don't add salt, and my ...


3

Cooked bones work fine, but depending on how they were cooked and for how long it may change how long you need to boil them to derive the maximum thickness. The ideal length of time for extracting gelatin from raw bones is about four hours. After that the gelatin starts to break down and loses its thickening power. Also, the more you can cut up the bones, ...


3

There's a specific term for reusing ingredients for stock twice: remouillage (which literally means a "rewetting"). Usually this "second stock" is not used directly for broth, as it has significantly less flavor than the primary stock. That said, depending on the type of bones, the amount of meat used in making the stock, etc., it may still have a very ...


2

I just pressure cooked a turkey, with roasting in the boiler just prior to the initial pressure cooking session, then afterwards, pressure cooking the carcass (bones and remaining skin and unused meat) two more times. After the second pressure cooking session of the turkey carcass and remains, the turkey bones were easily broken apart, either broken in the ...


1

As it cools, the fat and water will separate into two layers, with the fat on top. If there is no/little fat layer, then there simply isn't any fat. The thickness that seems fatty is just gelatin that has set like jelly. That's a good thing as it means the stock was well made.


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