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215

It's called deep pectoral myopathy or "green muscle disease", and it's a problem with heavy breasted poultry. The vessels are unable to supply enough blood to the muscle, with the result of death of the muscles affected. It's not detectable until the chicken is cut open. By the time you see the green colour, muscle death occurred a couple of weeks prior and ...


47

Chicken bones have a tendency to 'splinter' when 'mashed' (as in chewed upon), which is why you never give chicken bones to a dog. This applies equally to humans, if we gnaw on a chicken bone it is more like to create a harmful splinter that may find itself lodged in any number of places in your digestive system. That said, as has been commented above, ...


31

It's safe because freezing greatly slows (if not completely arrests) the growth of the bacteria that would otherwise make the meat spoil. It doesn't kill them, it just puts them in 'stasis'. The expiration date is given based on the meat only being refrigerated. If you intend to store the meat past its expiration date, best practice is to freeze the meat ...


28

I am answering this question, but I am not going to accept this answer, at least not without further research and/or experimentation and editing this answer to reflect that. I am hoping that somebody with a greater knowledge of chemistry and the nature of brining can add to or even credibly contradict the science of what I am saying here. My conclusions are ...


27

I've never been one to keep track of cooking times with meats, since it will vary wildly with meat thickness, burner strength and type, phase of the moon, etc. Edit: I forgot to answer "how to go about searing". I sear chicken like I sear beef: hard and fast. The point is to get that Maillard reaction going to add some deliciousness and texture (not to "...


25

These recipes aren't very standardized. Your mileage will vary greatly from one restaurant to another. That said, generally these are three distinct dishes. Orange chicken is... Orangey. Sesame Chicken is typically salty with a hint of sweetness, served with sesame seeds. General Tsos is typically sweeter with a little more heat and served with ...


23

I'd suggest Consumer Reports as a starting point. They specifically investigated the food safety of chicken in 2010 and found that (among other things): Campylobacter was in 62 percent of the chickens, salmonella was in 14 percent, and both bacteria were in 9 percent. Only 34 percent of the birds were clear of both pathogens. That's double the ...


23

If you're getting your eggs from a supermarket, they won't hatch. This is the case with eggs you get for eating from almost any source. Hens lay eggs even if they haven't been, umm, mating with a male. Any egg laid in those circumstances will never hatch because it's unfertilized, and that's the standard practice for any commercial egg operation. Now if ...


22

Short answer - you are right on all counts and she's wrong. Tell her that, she'll love it. ;) The longer answer is that boiling a frozen piece of meat, especially one that is thick in the middle like chicken breast is exactly the opposite of what you want to do as you'll cook the outside but the inside will still be frozen, and boiling (as you rightly ...


22

The first issue I see is that you are over cooking your chicken breast. 20 minutes in a pressure cooker is really over doing it. Even a little over cooking dries chicken breast. Chicken breast needs to be cooked more precisely. A pressure cooker is not the correct tool for the job. So you first need to correct your initial cooking. You should get a ...


21

Panko won't stick to chicken (too dry), but will stick to egg. Egg won't stick to chicken (too smooth and non-absorbant), but will stick to flour. Flour will stick to chicken. Dredge first through flour, then through (well beaten) egg, then through panko. It's a tricky combination, but if you do it right the results are excellent. Any dry spices you want ...


20

Cooking anything really lean for a long time can result in super dry meat. Chicken breasts have little fat and little connective issue. The same goes for a lean beef roast. You can do chicken breasts in a crock pot - just not all day, more like a few hours on low. Try something with more fat like a thigh (or any dark meat) or a beef chuck (shoulder) ...


20

It is not a good idea. You can certainly prepare your seasoned flour mixture and keep it in bulk. Just transfer it as you need it to the container where you do the actual breading or dredging; then you don't need to discard the entire amount.


20

The reasons people still roast whole birds are: Roasting a whole chicken is easier than butterflying it. While it's not tough to butterfly a chicken many people don't know how, or don't want the cleanup It's less prep time to roast a whole chicken. If you are busy you can have it from the fridge to the oven in less than a minute, while butterflying or ...


19

The reason why your meat is dry has less to do with whether you cook in liquid and more to do with the temperature you cook the meat to. The proteins in meat will squeeze out the water in them as you increase the temperature you cook them at. If you are cooking your breasts in boiling water then that can result in meat that is cooked far above well done. ...


19

I don't think much has happened to washing a chicken in itself, rather much more has happened to our knowledge about bacteria, hygiene, and cross contamination. Most likely, with or without washing, nothing bad is going to happen. But then again: It might. Properly cooking the poultry is going to get rid of the bacteria on the chicken, no washing needed. ...


18

The way restaurants do it is simple, straightforward, and also very easy to make organic by using organic ingredients. Standard 3-bowl breading 1) Bowl One: Seasoned flour -- flour, salt, pepper, and seasonings (for me: thyme, paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, onion powder, and parsley flakes) 2) Bowl Two: Egg wash -- Beaten egg with a 1-2 TBSP milk per ...


18

B is your best bet. In fact, that's the original (And IMO, best) way to do it! Find a nice heavy cast iron skillet, fill it around halfway with oil, and then fry your chicken and rotate it in the pan as needed Here are some links: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/deep-south-fried-chicken/ http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/fried-chicken-recipe....


17

Taken out of context, that doesn't make much sense, but I can think of several similar claims you might have heard - all of which are true and most can be found on the USDA fact sheet and the sites of most other agencies: Perishable food should not be left in the "danger zone" (4.4° C - 60° C or 40° F to 140° F) (room temperature) for more than a total of 2 ...


17

That chicken has been "velveted". The technique is to briefly marinate the chicken chunks in a mixture of egg whites and cornstarch. The result is delicious, very soft chicken. It's a simple technique, great for stir-fried dishes and soups. There are several variations, so here are a bunch of them. The simplest is to mix 1 Tablespoon of cornstarch into 1 ...


16

I found that putting chicken breasts in a ziplock bag and letting them sit in a bowl of water thaws them fairly quickly "changing the water helps too". Albet not as quickly as a microwave though however in my opinion too long on dethaw in a microwave seems to make the chicken taste off.


15

Raw meat should not have a smell to it. When it has an odour to it it is a sure sign that it is starting to spoil. Blood will spoil quicker and some rare conditions causes the smell on the meat. Washing it off helps to reduce the odour but it is best to just toss it out to avoid being made sick by eating it. Salmonella enterica infected chickens will ...


15

Pressure cookers will quickly soften most chicken bones. We make stock with our chicken carcasses in a pressure cooker, and the resulting bones can be crushed with fingers, no splintering.


15

If a dish, any dish, leftovers or otherwise, has raw chicken added to it, then is cooked until said chicken is fully cooked, it is then safe to eat. There is nothing from what you describe that justifies assuming that the way the dish is handled would be unsafe.


14

My main concern (would have been) BPA, as most cans nowadays are coated with BPA plastics inside to protect flavor. Cooks Illustrated evaluated the BPA leeched into chicken using this method: Beer can interiors are coated with an epoxy that contains Bisphenol A (BPA). Is the popular method of cooking a chicken perched on an open beer can really a ...


14

Store-bought chicken eggs are usually unfertilized, and so will not hatch under any condition. Chicken producers do sometimes keep eggs at slightly low temperatures to delay hatching for up to a week, or occasionally longer (for references see R.A. Ernst et al, Common Incubation Problems and R.A. Ernst, Hatching Egg Sanitation), but the lowest recommended ...


14

If you are intent on cooking the bird whole (as opposed to butchering it into pieces which you can fry in a pan), then your only option would be to braise the bird in a large pot, preferably a Dutch oven. There are myriad recipes online; search for "Chicken in a Pot" or "Braised Whole Chicken". As ElendilTheTall mentioned in the comments above, the only ...


14

I don't see how anything intrinsic about chickens has changed with respect to safety. We know that chickens can carry the salmonella bacteria and that means there's always a risk of a very serious illness when handling/eating raw chicken. Having said that, being too obsessed with these risks is what seems to be happening to the younger generations. The ...


14

Powdered sugar doesn't seem like a great thickener to me. It takes a lot to thicken a small amount of liquid, and as you've noticed, that means it'll end up pretty sweet. As an example, you can make a glaze (e.g. for cinnamon rolls) with a cup of powdered sugar and only a few tablespoons of liquid. Generally, people thicken things using starch, most ...


13

A study done in July 2008 found that in blind tests (i.e. if the eaters did not know whether they were eating "standard" or free-range chickens) the free-range chickens were actually found to be less preferred in terms of taste. They compared chickens that had been raised by "standard", maize-fed, free-range and organic production systems. Taste panel ...


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