14

Yes. Make it again and don't add horseradish. I'm totally serious - no traditional hummus recipe in the known universe has horseradish in it. There is nothing you are going to be able to do to your existing batch to remove that flavor, other than diluting it, but I don't think you'd be able to dilute it enough to be worth the effort.


13

They're the same thing. About the only difference is that "garbanzo bean" is less common in British English than in American English, and chickpea is more common either way, but it's just a language thing. There are indeed different varieties, with some smaller and some larger, but they don't have common language names like that. Wikipedia mentions three ...


12

Boy is THAT ever controversial. It seems that everybody has a theory as to why some beans float while most do not. The most common answer is that the "floaters" are older, and less hydrated to begin with. Some people insist that some beans float because worms have gotten into them. Hogwash, ignore those comments. The bottom line is that "floaters" are ...


9

Growing up, my mother always used to bake them. They do turn out a bit drier than if you deep-fried them, but not overmuch. They cook for about 15-20 minutes at 400°F (~200 °C), or until golden and crispy on the outside. Alternately, you can pan-fry them, as other answers have suggested. Or you can split the difference and oven fry them. If you're ...


8

The USDA guidelines for canning dried peas or beans (or here) gives the rule of thumb that 12 ounces of dried peas/beans produces 1 quart (32 fluid ounces) of canned product. That's a ratio of 3 oz dry per 8 fl oz cooked. They don't specifically mention chickpeas in the document, but the same ratio appears in other places, here for example. At that ratio, 7....


8

I have just cooked 290 grams of dried chickpeas which filled 1 cup, in a pressure cooker. After cooking the drained weight was 616 grams or 2.12 times the dry weight. The volume was 3.75 cups or 3.75 the dried volume


7

Roasted, salted dry chickpeas are a snack food. I would not expect for you to be able to make humus out of them; for one thing, they would have way too much salt, and the texture would be wrong. It might be possible with a lot of experimentation, but you'd need to go through several failed batches before you got one which worked. Personally, I'd just go ...


6

The white foam is a 'scum' that is formed as protein is released from the chickpeas. Yes, that is the term that is used. Scum. This can be skimmed for aesthetic reasons - it sticks to the pot, or overboils, etc... You are absolutely right, though, that if the chickpeas are rinsed after, then this is washed away. If you are draining and pureeing, it will ...


6

the ABSOLUTE BEST WAY, is to cook them only half the time (the dried ones and drained 24 hours), half the time would be 20-25 minutes... take them out after 25 minutes, put a tablespoon of baking soda on an ounce (420 grams), stir the soda in well. Than put them on a very hot flat pan over the fire for 2-3 minutes. The skin will just stick to the pan. Than ...


5

Chickpea puree with sesame paste would be hummus. Hummus can be served warm or cold, so you could serve it straight out of the can if you wanted. To warm it up, I'd avoid heating it with any kind of direct heat, but it should be fine microwaved briefly. When it is served warm, it's not hot by any means, so a gentle heating is all that's needed.


5

First rule of the microwave... Always use a loose-fitting lid. It reduces the cleaning frequency of the interior from once a day to every 6 months or so ;) I'm pretty sure that unless you want to prod every single legume with a cocktail stick before putting it in the microwave, then you can only do so much to mitigate this issue. Closed containers will go '...


5

I soaked the roasted chickpeas for 24 hours or so, with a few changes of water, and they seemed to rehydrate just fine. I cooked them in a pressure cooker until tender (overall, about 50 minutes, in 15 minute stretches), and they ended up with about the right texture, but with a washed-out taste, and the water looked like a thin, white, chickpea broth. I ...


5

Chickpea - Garbanzo flour I use it in many ways. Normally I start with the whole pea and run it through my Vita-mix blender, quite often along with lentils, great white northern beans. Depending on my end use I may run the batch through a sieve and rerunning coarse through the blender again. The floured bean mix I keep some ready on the shelf for soup &...


5

Nobody has mentioned socca? It's a delicious pancake from Nice, France. I first had it in Brooklyn at Pates Et Traditions where they serve it very crispy and buttery. Here is a recipe.


4

You don't need to sprout your chickpeas, but there are benefits when you do, as sprouting substantially increases nutritional value. By allowing the legume (or seed or grain) to germinate, the phytic acid within it is neutralized, as are enzyme inhibitors. The Nourishing Gourmet Kimi Harris describes: Phytic acid binds with calcium, magnesium, iron, ...


4

Chickpeas are starchy, so it's natural that the liquid they are cooked in will thicken when it cools. It will not 'clog your arteries' - food doesn't travel directly to your bloodstream in the form in which you eat it.


4

What a great idea! I bought my chickpea flour (called channa flour) from the Indian ( Punjabi) section in a grocery store which 'm pretty certain isn't sprouted. Any problem with gas will be reduced by sprouting. Sprouting converts indigestible oligosaccharides (complex sugars) to simpler sugars easily digested. It's bacteria in our gut metabolizing these ...


4

For this specific recipe, you may be able to get away with this substitution, since what you're making is a bread, but also because it's a bread there's less room for error than in many dishes. Rather than try to substitute in this specific recipe, I'd look for another recipe for banana bread made with garbanzo bean flour - a cursory google found many - and ...


4

I used almond flour as an alternative and it worked pretty well. The perfect temperature is difficult at first but just keep trying....falafels are worth the efforts.


4

Just want to share a pro-kitchen tip here: you do not have to pre-soak chickpeas. I know this is potentially a huge point of contention for a lot of people and flies in the face of convention, but you can get away with a hard boil for 30 minutes followed by an hour or so of simmer. Add salt at the simmer point. This was standard practice at more than a few ...


4

I usually serve these as an appetizer, they're so good with a smoky seasoning blend. Using canned beans is where your process is falling down. Use fresh beans that you soaked and cooked. The age of the beans are the deciding factor between chalk and cream. I like to use a crock pot and all manner of seasonings. Other things I've found: Slightly overcook ...


3

I bought a Vintage Foley Food Mill set with the red handles on eBay... It's great for mashed potatoes, crushing crackers, baby food, and separating the skins off of garbanzo beans for hummus.


3

There are several varieties of chickpeas. Most of what we see in North America are the larger variety which is used more in certain cooking applications. The names chickpea and garbanzo are the same and interchangeable, with Garbanzo being the Spanish name. There are also several other names that would be interchangeable depending on where you are. Good ...


3

Chickpeas are HARD, but they will fall to a standard hand corn mill if you do it in a couple of passes. First pass you set the mill wide, just to crack the beans in half. If you set it too tight, you risk breaking the handle, or the plates. Once you've got the beans broken, they're not so tough, and you can get them to a course corn meal like texture with ...


3

The Wondermill Junior Deluxe claims that it will grind chickpeas, it's over $200 American. I've found several articles (example) that claim you can do it in a manual coffee grinder. Here's a reasonably priced, highly rated manual coffee grinder from Amazon. Amazon will let customers ask questions of others that have purchased a specific item. I asked if that ...


3

I have always used room temperature water, & have never had any problem. Generally I take the water from the Brtia filter sitting on my countertop.


3

I rolled the chickpea between two tea towels and used a rolling pin. Rolled the chickpeas wich loosen the skin then place the chickpeas into a bowl with water and let gravity lifed the skins up to the top. I washed the peas. There you are chickpeas without water easy.


3

The best way to freeze felafel batter really is formed into small balls, but not cooked. Then you can toss the partially thawed balls into hot oil without further fuss. Because the balls are fragile, as you noticed, that means lining them up on a cookie sheet and freezing them that way, which you may or may not have room for. I have not tried freezing a ...


3

This is a standard task for pressure cooking. Normally, pressure cooking only saves you time. But with dried legumes and with potatoes, the result is typically creamier. Also, try switching your chickpea source if you only had your experience with one batch. Maybe you just happened to use a batch that was old, or grown under imperfect conditions. The ...


3

I have made chickpeas 2x recently and I was happy with them. What I did: 1: Rinse and then short soak - maybe 1 hour. 2: Long cook, covered - more like 12 hours. Chickpeas are little beasts. They can take it. 3: Salted cooking water, enough to cover chickpeas and not extra. I think cooking in salty water gets the salt thru and thru the bean. I ...


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