5

First rule of the microwave... Always use a loose-fitting lid. It reduces the cleaning frequency of the interior from once a day to every 6 months or so ;) I'm pretty sure that unless you want to prod every single legume with a cocktail stick before putting it in the microwave, then you can only do so much to mitigate this issue. Closed containers will go '...


4

For this specific recipe, you may be able to get away with this substitution, since what you're making is a bread, but also because it's a bread there's less room for error than in many dishes. Rather than try to substitute in this specific recipe, I'd look for another recipe for banana bread made with garbanzo bean flour - a cursory google found many - and ...


3

This is a standard task for pressure cooking. Normally, pressure cooking only saves you time. But with dried legumes and with potatoes, the result is typically creamier. Also, try switching your chickpea source if you only had your experience with one batch. Maybe you just happened to use a batch that was old, or grown under imperfect conditions. The ...


3

I have made chickpeas 2x recently and I was happy with them. What I did: 1: Rinse and then short soak - maybe 1 hour. 2: Long cook, covered - more like 12 hours. Chickpeas are little beasts. They can take it. 3: Salted cooking water, enough to cover chickpeas and not extra. I think cooking in salty water gets the salt thru and thru the bean. I ...


3

Chickpeas are whole legumes commonly known as garbanzo beans. When these beans are split and husked you get split chickpeas or Chana Dal. Not really orange in color, but more like yellowish. Considered a lentil, Chana dal(Split chickpeas) is commonly used in Indian cuisine and usually sold in Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi food stores. Most supermarkets ...


2

Sodium chloride along with sugar is something that most manufacturers add to their products. Yes, rinsing will reduce the sodium content.


2

The recipe calls for chana dal or Split Desi Chickpeas. Those are the ones you buy dry at every indiand/Asian food shop. They could be rather in section with flour and moong dal rather than with the whole grains like chickpeas or rice.


2

As an approximate guide, I multiply the dry weight by 2.25 to get the soaked and cooked weight of beans and chickpeas. Most recipes are forgiving for a few grams difference in weight. It always works and I cook a lot with legumes and prefer using dry over canned for confidence in knowing what is in the food I cook. Check out Nourishing Traditions for ...


1

In the end what worked for me was cooking them before freezing them. They hold together reasonably well, but the real benefit is that I can microwave them for a quick dinner if they only need reheating, and that fits with my partial meal-prepping approach that relies on freezing to balance weekly effort against variety.


1

After soaking, I thoroughly rinse the beans, drain and then pat dry with paper towels and store them in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. Then they need to be cooked within the next one or two days or they don't smell fresh. If that happens, I throw them away and start over.


1

I shell on a regular basis. Dead simple: Boil dried peas for twenty minutes. Cool under cold water. Rub the peas between the hands and float off the skins. Five rinses and the peas are completely skinned. It takes less than five minutes for a liter. Then cook the chickpeas for about one hours at a gently boil to soften for tempeh making. Pictures: ...


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