55

Cayenne pepper powder comes from the cayenne pepper. It is hot/spicy, registering 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville units. Chilli powder, depending where you live, can mean anything between pure powdered chilli pepper (location would determine the specific type of pepper) to a spice blend of chillies with cumin, oregano, and/or other spices. Depending on the ...


22

They give a similar range of flavours, but in quite different proportions. They’re all made from ground roasted or dried red peppers of some kind, so all of them involve some amounts of spiciness (chilli heat), fruitiness, earthiness, and other aspects of the flavour of roasted peppers. Cayenne typically has much more of the hotter and sharper flavours ...


21

Alcohol is a disinfectant, so any bacteria sitting around for a month in vodka have been thoroughly killed... The only thing to worry about is that if some of the chillies were not completely submerged all of the time, you might have a slight problem. The symptoms to look for is discolouring: look for brown / black spots / extremities. If not: no worries: ...


18

As Fabby notes in their answer, alcohol is an excellent preservative. As long as your peppers are fully submerged, it's extremely unlikely that they could rot or spoil in any way. (If they aren't, there's a risk that mold or something could grow on the exposed parts, but even that's fairly low if all the surfaces have been at least temporarily in contact ...


5

There are evidence of the use of chili pepper in Asia centuries before the Columbian Exchange. The thirteenth century stone inscriptions from the Bagan period of Myanmar (formerly Burma) documented the use of chili pepper as either donation or payment towards the cost the construction of its many pagodas. Farther to the east, Korean researchers (Yang et al....


4

As they're too hot, your options are reduced to dilution or donation. By the latter I simply mean giving them to a friendly chilli head who doesn't grow their own. To dilute dried chillies, first crush them or put them through a food processor to get flakes. Then use the flakes sparingly. If you add them to oil just after frying onions etc. for a dish, the ...


4

Jalapeño would indeed not be a good choice, but if you can buy them locally red Thai chilli peppers are great for this: I use 2 of these per bottle of vodka and then a dash of liquid honey, but I put the peppers in whole and leave them be for at least 6 months. As you seem to be in a bit more of a rush: Wear gloves! Cut them in 2 Remove the seeds Cut them ...


4

The heat of your condiments isn't actually being lost. The condiments are marrying, meaning the heat becomes more homogenously distributed through the condiment. This means you don't have bits and pieces that have as high a spike in heat than the rest of the salsa, and therefore the condiment is more evenly hot (thought apparently cooler to the taster) ...


4

I've never come across anywhere where powder and flakes mean the same, but substituting one for the other should work in terms of flavour (the appearance and texture might be a bit different). More specifically, in some places chilli powder means powdered chillies (like cayenne), in others it means chilli spice blend. Here in the UK it's even worse - both ...


3

You could try other piperine containing types of peppers (Piper genus), these include P. longum (long pepper) and P. retrofractum, as well as white pepper P. nigrum, though any member of the Piper genus should contain some piperine, but amounts and hence spiciness will vary. You could also try ginger (Zingiber genus), as well as mustard seeds and shoots/...


3

My personal experience is that, if you cook the rocoto peppers together with other ingredients in a pan, like in this recipe, or better simmer them in a tomato, cider, or vinegar-based sauce, most of the hotness is retained. Capsaicin vaporizes well above simmering temperatures, so it's mainly high-heat frying or roasting that will drive you out of your ...


3

My suggestion is: try simmering the sauce for a short while before storing it in the fridge. My answer is based on the sauce I use for my Fajitas (onion, assorted peppers, ground cumin and cayenne, cilantro, garlic, and lime juice with honey and butter for a touch of sweetness). It is heated through and coats pulled chicken. This sauce is rather spicy at ...


3

Frankly drying is not the way to go if you want to retain flavor and texture. When you dry fruit (chilis are fruits, not vegetables) you make a load of irreversible changes in texture and flavor. A chili is made of tiny cells filled with liquid, the drying process ruptures these so the water can escape. Rehydrating a dried chili doesn't make it plump up ...


3

You can add any kind of fat that will encapsulate the capsaicin from the chili. This can be: Dairy (full-fat milk or cream) Butter Rendered fat (along with creme or butter) You can also add a sweetener to offset the impact of the capsaicin, but that's not ideal for biryani. With the fat, what happens is, the 'hot' parts of the chili get coated and sort of ...


2

Calabrians eat a lot of chile peppers, but usually the one referred to as "Calabrian chiles" to foreign audiences is a variety of diamante chile pepper, grown in Southern Italy, salted and packed in oil, and sold as "hot long chile peppers". These are commercially available in the USA from brands like Tutto Calabria and DeLallo. The confusion comes in ...


2

Dairy products have the impeccable ability to dampen heat from peppers, hot sauce and other spicy items. This includes milk (often drunk along with very spicy foods and peppers), sour cream, and cheese, among others. I find Sour Cream not only adds to the complexity of flavors in most chili's (a great thing!), but also quells the heat quite a bit. I'd ...


2

I grow my own chillies and to keep them available year round I freeze some and dry some. Last night's stir fry had a couple of frozen chillies in (after being out of the freezer for 5 minutes they chop easily and are ready to add to the pan). The night before I used some dried chillies in a slow cooked 3 bean chilli. This demonstrates the different uses ...


2

Try it & see ;) Aleppo isn't particularly hot; I haven't checked it on the Scoville scale, but just from experience, though it's got a little kick to it, & that kick can be quite variable depending on your source of the pepper, to me, aleppo is used for its flavour rather than its kick. Cayenne, on the other hand, I always consider to be "free heat"...


2

Most likely the peppers. Jalapeño & Banana Peppers are usually canned as a pickle, so yes, it is sour. You added some of the pickle liquid as well; I feel your dissatisfaction with the results. =-) I love peppers (pickled or otherwise) in noodles. What I do to cut down on the sourness is drain the peppers of it's liquid and rinse with cold water once. ...


1

I know that people frown upon recipes on here, but in the book "Quantity Recipes: From Meals for Many" by the New York State College for Home Economics, 1945, they recommend a serving size of 3/4 cup, which for 50 to 55 people is: 9 lbs ground beef 2 lbs ground pork 1 1/2 cups onions, chopped 1 cup beef dripping or other fat 5 qts kidney beans (#10 can) or ...


1

You could ramp up the heat by adding more cumin rather than more black pepper. It's commonly used in both Indian, and in Mexican cuisine, so the flavour shouldn't be too strange. It can make spicy dishes feel much more fiery. Other possibilities are to use other warm spices, such as cloves, cinnamon, ginger, Szechuan pepper corn, mustard seeds, etc . . . ...


1

If you're looking for something to mimic the flavor profile of chili peppers, to give you familiar-ish tastes in your food, the best I've found is sweet or smoked sweet paprika. Sweet paprika is made from bell peppers would contain no capsaicin, since bell peppers do not. Hot paprika, on the other hand, is made from capsaicin bearing peppers and would ...


1

I found a reference searching on how to cool your mouth after eating a pepper. Eat starches. Eat starches if your mouth is burning from ingesting chili peppers. They should give you some relief. Although starches like rice and bread aren’t going to be as effective at dissolving the capsaicin as fats, oils or alcohol, they will help cool the ...


1

Be very careful with mustard. Premade mustard contains paprika. I make my own for recipes that call for it, and use the dry mustard to cook often. Cumin is a wonderful way to add flavor, and I especially like corriander. Experiment and see what you like best. Its a bit of a crapshoot and everyone's tastes are a little different. Cook in small batches, so ...


1

Sugar is a natural preservative, and makes the flavor milder (not less hot if these are hot peppers, but reduces sourness of vinegar and saltiness of salt.) That way you have more of natural preservatives and not as heavy impact on the flavor - you might use just vinegar, just salt, or just sugar in amounts that add up to the combined 3 for the same ...


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