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1

Although this question is a few years old I'll mention that recently I've been getting in to making pepper mash and doing a countertop brine fermentation with my habeƱeros. This has resulted in very little loss of heat. I have a batch going right now that's been fermenting for just about one week and surprisingly, it's tasting hotter than when I started it. ...


1

Hot sauce definitely loses its heat after a while.. though it seems to last longer when there's a layer of olive oil on top, which makes me think that oxidation is playing a role in breaking down the capsaicin, or whatever it is that makes it hot. I usually do my hot sauce in a very simple way: simply chop the raw peppers (I use Peri-peri), drown them out in ...


14

Dried hot peppers lose flavor and heat over time. At ten years old, your poblano peppers are probably fairly bland. Smell them. If they don't smell bad, taste them. (Taste them cautiously; they may still have some heat.) If they are completely tasteless, then there's really no point in using them. The wouldn't be harmful, they just won't add anything to your ...


39

Do NOT eat this. You figured out right that the stuff on top is mold. The thing that makes mold dangerous is the mycotoxins produced by it and these will likely remain in the sauce even if you scrape off the furry stuff. So eating this comes with high risk of affecting your health. Move it to the trash bin right away. I would recommend to try again with a ...


2

I haven't found a specific recipe so far - but I did find this: 'Criolla de Cocina' is a unique chiltoma pepper from Nicaragua. It is a sweet pepper characterized by a strong flavor, thin walls, and wrinkled appearance (like an oversized habaƱero). These types of peppers are used in Nicaragua for the classic sauce known as salsa criolla campesina, which ...


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