Hot answers tagged

29

You don't realize it, but you've asked a hot-button question. Expect to get lots of comments about botulism, etc. This is a result of a report a few years back about folks getting botulism from homemade garlic oil. I'll keep my answer practical. First, depending on where you live, your state, city, county, or other regional government may already have ...


22

As noted above, reducing the liquid through evaporation will thicken up the chili but you run the risk of burning/scorching the bottom and it can take a long time at lower temperatures. What I like to do is to take some of the beans (I prefer black beans in mine) and mash them up into a thick paste and then stir that into the chili. The starches from the ...


19

Dilute heavily by using a very small portion of peppers per dish Allow cooking time for the pepper flavor to permeate the dish before adding more. It's not like black pepper where the taste spreads instantly. Remove the seeds and membranes holding them, as this reduces spiciness considerably Cut peppers very finely or puree so there aren't any large pieces ...


18

Cinnamon adds a different spice profile than chili powder or red or cayenne pepper would. It is a common savory spice in Indian food and I believe it's also used in savory dishes in Chinese cooking. It's a very versatile spice :). We also use cocoa powder in our chili as it provides a real depth of flavor (dark bitter flavors which are quite good in chili). ...


18

Cocoa powder is sometimes added to regular chili because the bitter earthiness compliments the dark chilies. White chicken chili only contains green chilies and has no complex flavor to compliment. White chocolate might make your chili creamier but there are cheaper ingredients that do that better.


16

I use instant Corn Masa Flour as thickener. It seems to hold onto water better over time than does corn meal. That's likely because unlike corn meal, it's precooked, nixtamalized. Either way, you'll get a bit of a corny taste.


15

White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder. You will just add cocoa butter (fat) and sugar. I believe it will be useless in your chicken chili.


14

What do you mean by "need"? Will the stew have a deeper, richer, more savory flavor if you brown the meat first? Absolutely yes, due the maillard compounds you alluded to. Is it necessary to brown the meat before the long braise in the stew for food safety reasons? Not at all. You can cook it unbrowned, and it will be perfectly safe assuming you ...


13

I add beer to my chili and simply let it simmer with the lid off for an hour or two so the liquid evaporates. I've never had a problem with overcooking.


12

Put the chili in the fridge overnight, and the oil will gather at the top. Then you can just scrape it off with a spoon.


10

The hottest part of any chilli is the membrane the holds the seeds (contrary to popular belief that says it's the seeds themselves). If you remove this, you remove a lot of the heat. So if you want to try using ghost chilli, I'd suggest A) removing the seeds and membrane and B) chopping finely, then adding a little at a time to your dish, tasting after each ...


10

If you want to thicken it fast use flour, just don't add it directly to the pot (If you do, the flour will clump and you'll spend the next couple of hours trying to de-clump the clumps). Use a bowl. To the bowl, add 1-2 tablespoons of flour and a cup of hot liquid from the chili. Mix/whisk both until combined. Add this mixture to your chili and stir until ...


10

First, I concur with @SAJ14SAJ. An additional reason (that you may 'need/want') to brown the meats first is that it will allow you to drain a fair portion of the oils from the meat before incorporating into the remaining ingredients. Depending on the quality of the meats you have selected this could be a significant volume. Draining off this grease will ...


10

You have four immediate options as I see it: Lightly season the chili, remove a portion for your child, then season the rest to your liking Lightly season the chili, then serve it with additional accompaniments to adjust it to your liking (eg, hot sauces) Season the chili to your liking, but serve it with something to help cut the flavor for the child (...


9

You have two different approaches from Catija and eckes, depending on what you favor, but you could also combine both approaches - Start by chopping up the bacon, and then cooking it in the pot until it's nicely crisped and the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon, to paper towels to soak the remaining fat from the bacon and leave it in ...


9

I wouldn't. The purpose of the chocolate in a regular chili is the bitterness and flavor that come from the cocoa solids. (I use cocoa powder in my own chili - never so much that the chocolate flavor is discernable, and never a sweetened chocolate. I'll use 100% unsweetened chocolate if I have it on hand.) White chocolate - even the real stuff with cocoa ...


8

I don't like using masa flour as it affects both texture and flavor. I have come up with some less conventional ways to thicken chili that work: Brisket torn into small pieces. Buy some pre-cooked from your local BBQ house, remove the crunchy and fatty parts, and tear the rest into very small pieces. These bitty brisket bits will fill the voids and make ...


7

I just came back from a local chili festival where I was able to taste the ghost chili for the first time. My favorite by far was a dark chocolate and toffee brittle with ghost chili. You can absolutely taste the difference between the ghost chili and habanero. I was surprised at how different the flavors are, but folks who aren't used to using different ...


7

Make another batch of chili with no or reduced onions, and combine them--freeze if needed, so you can use it all. This is the only reasonly guaranteed way to resolve the issue. Chili freezes and holds very well, so this might be practical even though somewhat extravagent with the ingredients. I know that isn't what you want to hear, but it is the truth. ...


7

Since it is already made, simmer the chili at low heat for another hour or so allowing the onions to cook further and soften. They will slowly dissolve into the stew and the oniony flavour won't be as harsh. Generally all flavours will mellow out with cooking. (@citizen) Adding a bit of sugar or agave nectar may cut the oniony taste as a last ditch ...


7

There are two different issues: safety, and flavor. From a safety point of view, assuming you don't overload your slow cooker, and it comes up to safe temperatures (140 F, 60 C) in less than two hours (preferably much less), it is perfectly safe to begin cooking in a slow cooker with raw ground meat. On the other hand, you will not get the flavor ...


6

Your mix is just a chili powder with a fruity flair. As a rule of thumb, chili powder contains large amounts of chilis, cumin, and either garlic or onion. Other flavors come and go and appear in varying quantities. The ingredients in your mix that are not typical are the amchur, coriander, and cinnamon. Cinnamon with chili powder is not unheard of and ...


6

One habanero per six quarts of chili, containing approximately one quart meat, provides a solid heat that an average palate can handle. I have cooked chili on numerous occasions for groups of people and found this formula works for most people. Typically I stack it with other, lower-Scoville peppers to produce a well-bodied heat. Other things to bear in ...


6

The heat is the same; all peppers contain capsaicin. The Scoville scale defines heat in terms of capsaicin content. Use the peppers that have the flavor you want, and make it as hot as you want, and you'll be set. And the flavor besides heat is definitely concentrated in the flesh, so you shouldn't notice any real difference in pepper flavor either.


6

It looks to me like you have a couple of things going on here: You are worried about the safety of undercooked beans You want your beans to be palatable To address the safety issue, I think we'd need to know more about the kind of beans you're using. Kidney beans are the ones most well known to be toxic if they are undercooked. Other beans, say, great ...


6

Depending on whether you'd consider this a compromise (I consider it a feature), corn meal or crushed tortilla chips not only thicken it but also add a flavor that usually complements the chili.


6

The answer to your question is given on the page you referenced. Since I'm going to be simmering everything for several hours, do I need to cook the rest of the meat before mixing with everything else? No, not unless you want to. In terms of ensuring the meat is cooked correctly, simmering for 2 hours or more is more than enough time. Should I? That's a ...


6

I've never known cayenne pepper to have any flavor, so if it is bitter you may have a bad batch, or the brand you are using may have put in additives that give it a bitter flavor. You may have other sources of bitterness: beer: brewers add hops to beer to give it bitterness, and some beer is more bitter than others, it depends on which type you chose Tomato ...


6

For richness, I wouldn't go to cocoa, but probably nutmeg. Allspice or cardamon might also work, depending on the flavors.


5

If you cook them long enough, they'll still soften up, you just might have to simmer them overnight or even into the next day. Although I'll refrain from the obvious jokes, prolonged cooking also reduces one other common side effect of beans. I'm sure you can guess what the side effect is.


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