Hot answers tagged

29

You don't realize it, but you've asked a hot-button question. Expect to get lots of comments about botulism, etc. This is a result of a report a few years back about folks getting botulism from homemade garlic oil. I'll keep my answer practical. First, depending on where you live, your state, city, county, or other regional government may already have ...


23

tl;dr : it's complicated. If you're relying on cooking by blindly following recipes, and hoping that they come out the same every time, then yes, you probably want to replace old spices. So professionals are going to give that advice, as it's easier for every chef in the restaurant to be able to re-create a given dish, or for home chefs to have a chance for ...


18

Cocoa powder is sometimes added to regular chili because the bitter earthiness compliments the dark chilies. White chicken chili only contains green chilies and has no complex flavor to compliment. White chocolate might make your chili creamier but there are cheaper ingredients that do that better.


15

White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder. You will just add cocoa butter (fat) and sugar. I believe it will be useless in your chicken chili.


10

I don't like using masa flour as it affects both texture and flavor. I have come up with some less conventional ways to thicken chili that work: Brisket torn into small pieces. Buy some pre-cooked from your local BBQ house, remove the crunchy and fatty parts, and tear the rest into very small pieces. These bitty brisket bits will fill the voids and make ...


10

I wouldn't. The purpose of the chocolate in a regular chili is the bitterness and flavor that come from the cocoa solids. (I use cocoa powder in my own chili - never so much that the chocolate flavor is discernable, and never a sweetened chocolate. I'll use 100% unsweetened chocolate if I have it on hand.) White chocolate - even the real stuff with cocoa ...


10

I doubt you can salvage this dish. Once you add flavors you can't take them out, you can try to compensate and balance using other ingredients, which you have tried. Beer adds sweetness, bitterness from hops and sometimes acidity depending on the type of beer, you would need to judge which one you need to balance and add an ingredient to do that. However, ...


9

You have two different approaches from Catija and eckes, depending on what you favor, but you could also combine both approaches - Start by chopping up the bacon, and then cooking it in the pot until it's nicely crisped and the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon, to paper towels to soak the remaining fat from the bacon and leave it in ...


8

There are two different issues: safety, and flavor. From a safety point of view, assuming you don't overload your slow cooker, and it comes up to safe temperatures (140 F, 60 C) in less than two hours (preferably much less), it is perfectly safe to begin cooking in a slow cooker with raw ground meat. On the other hand, you will not get the flavor ...


7

In general you can expect better results from fresher ingredients and spices. In my favorite Pakistani restaurant they grind their spices on a daily basis and it really makes a difference. Even without a refined palate you will be easily able to taste a considerable difference between freshly ground pepper and pre-ground pepper that has been sitting on the ...


6

I've seen some of the usual answers like ground tortilla chips (unsalted if you can find them), and masa harina, but potato flakes (the instant ones in a box) are a great way to thicken your chili (or any soup). You can also do a quick cornstarch slurry by mixing a tablespoon of water and a tablespoon of corn starch and add as needed. Always add either of ...


6

Acids tend to reduce the heat of chilli, so you could try adding some vinegar or lime juice. If that makes the dish too acidic, add some sugar to balance it out. Dairy also reduces the heat so you could serve with sour cream and/or cheese, or even stir some butter into the chilli, which would also give it a slightly richer taste.


6

For richness, I wouldn't go to cocoa, but probably nutmeg. Allspice or cardamon might also work, depending on the flavors.


6

So, first, that chili recipe will always be heavily meat-flavored because it has 3lbs of beef in it; at a glance, that recipe is more than half beef by weight. So if you want a recipe with a subtler meat flavor, that's probably not the right recipe for you. There are several possible reasons for it being less spicy than you expected, among which are: the ...


5

No cooking it longer will make it worse. In my experience chili stays the same or gets hotter with age. If your Chili is too hot the best thing to do is make another batch without the chili or Tabasco or the heat ingredient/s you used and then mix the two batches together but failing making a new batch serve it with a dairy product like melted cheese or ...


5

How about reducing the beer (and other possible fluids) separately before adding them? That should give you the desired flavor effect without the excess water.


5

If you are going to be canning this for long term storage you will need to be pressure canning it, and as that will mean some pretty high heat you'd be better off not cooking you beans too long before canning. I'd add them in a few minutes before the end of cooking just to get them warmed up in preparation for canning it as a half hour of cooking plus ...


5

Moving to answer for OP. If you want to save the crispiness, or a least some of it, the suggestions of sprinkling small pieces at serving time would seem the way to go. It will give you the noticeable contrast and even draw attention to the bacon while not over-powering the base chili flavors. The added bonus that eckes points out is that it gives the ...


5

I have successfully smoked with apple wood chunks wrapped in foil in my outdoor grill. The trick is to find a setting that will maintain ~300 F using 1/2 of the burners. Then place the foil-wrapped chunks on the hot side and the meat on the cool side. The wood will begin to smoke after 10 minutes or so. Keep checking periodically to maintain 300 F. I do this ...


5

To some extent chilli (capsaicin) is like salt in that the best way to reduce the taste is dilution. However with capsaicin you can also make use of the fact that it dissolves in fats. But you can't neutralise it - up you'll always be increasing the size of the dish. To dilute you could make another batch without the heat, and combine the two. A good ...


5

I think that definition of 'good' is 'it won't kill you'. I wouldn't even keep supermarket spices 2 to 4 years, let alone the good stuff. By extrapolation [though I haven't used a pre-mixed 'chilli con carne' mix in decades] anything you get from the supermarket is going to be half-dead before you open it. Simple cayenne powder doesn't have much aroma anyway,...


5

This answer suppliments Joe's, specifically for chili powder. A good chili powder* has three groups of flavors: heat from the capsaicin, fruity flavors from the pepper, and smoky flavors from toasting, drying, and/or smoking. Over time and air exposure, both the fruity and smoky flavors fade, leaving only the capsaicin. So the old chili powder will still be ...


4

cinnamon is a basis flavor of Cincinnati style chili, it has some inherent heat as well as sweetness to it. Chili benefits from both, but I don't like Cincinnati style chili where you can "taste" the cinnamon. Lots of chili recipes have seemingly odd and unusual ingredients including, jams and jellies, as well as chocolate.


4

In a chili application, the recipe is going to be forgiving. You will get a little more texture from the cubed (diced) tomatoes assuming that your recipe doesn't then cook them down a considerable time; more absolute quantity of tomato flavor from the crushed simply because you have more of it. Both should give you good outcomes. Choose the one that you ...


4

The author of the linked recipe appears to be substituting in turn for gochujang, which in addition to spice has a bit of a yeasty, fermented flavor not unlike miso (no surprise, since both include fermented soybean). Sambal oelek will be brighter, generally hotter, and looser in texture. It's less of a paste than the chili stuff used here, so the ...


4

Add more of the other ingredients Add dairy Add acid Add a sweetener Serve with bland, starchy foods Options 1 and 5 provide a solution which will not alter the flavor of your chili too much. Source of ideas: The Kitchn


4

I've never come across anywhere where powder and flakes mean the same, but substituting one for the other should work in terms of flavour (the appearance and texture might be a bit different). More specifically, in some places chilli powder means powdered chillies (like cayenne), in others it means chilli spice blend. Here in the UK it's even worse - both ...


3

Cincinnati Chili often has cardamom, along with cinnamon and cocoa. Cardamom is used in savory and sweet foods all over the world, not just in India. If you have reason to want to try this particular recipe, then try the recipe as written. There are thousands of beloved recipes for all kinds of chili. There is no reason to say, "That one looks good, I'll ...


3

There are several ways you can thicken Chili than adding Masa Harina: Add another thickening agent: flour and cornstarch are both widely used, you can also try other flours like graham flour, chickpea flour, or arrowroot. Note that if you use flour you'll want to fry it in oil or butter or risk a raw flour taste in the dish Add refried beans: this adds ...


3

I added an undiluted can of tomato soup but the real saviour was butter which immediately calmed the whole dutch oven batch to a really great tasting chili. I probably stirred in a good 2 tblsp. Finally, if serving in bowls, as I didn't have sour cream, I did a little spiral of ranch dressing on top. GREAT !


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