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1

So, normally ssamjang calls for both doenjang (which is generally, but not always, not spicy), and gochujang (which is spicy). Presumably you'd be substituting your doubanjiang for both of those things, not just one of them, since it has both beans and chilis. You'll also encounter three other differences: generally doubanjiang is looser than the Korean ...


2

Since no one more knowledgeable has come along, I'll go ahead and put together an answer. Based on the recipe, it looks like you're actually intended to make your own black bean sauce using fermented black beans, or douchi. It seems that Chinese douchi are made and known as "hamanatto" in Japan as well. Searching online, there are retailers that ...


2

The two have almost nothing in common, beyond being fermented and pastes (though doubanjiang is only sort of paste-like). The ingredients (broad beans and chilies versus soybeans) and the taste are very different. That’s not to say that you’re not allowed to make a sauce for your ssam with doubanjiang, of course. But one is not a straightforward substitute ...


3

A fresh mushroom consists of mostly water. Dehydrating is a way to make them shelf stable. The soaking of dried mushrooms is supposed to rehydrate them or rather, start the rehydration process, which is often finished when cooking the mushrooms in the dish. You can theoretically just dump the mushrooms in a liquidy dish like soup, and I have done so with ...


4

冬菇 are indeed Lentinula edodes or shiitake mushrooms. Note that mushrooms can vary a bit in color depending on where the were grown and dehydrating will also change them.


0

Fresh/raw mushrooms are quite bland by themselves (yes I know there are exceptions). I suggest pan fry in oil them before using them in the soup, or chop them up and bake them in the oven on a sheet pan. When you are using dried mushroom, you will re-hydrate them in water and you will usually use the resulting liquid which contains a lot of flavor in the ...


0

Conventional wisdom says that you should not soak fresh mushrooms in water. You can quickly rinse out the dirt and dry them out before using them, but some people will say that even rinsing will impact the end result flavor/taste. (anecdotal) I mostly disagree when the mushrooms are cooked on the other hand, there might be a small difference when used raw, ...


0

There are a couple of vegetables in there that are yellow-green, one is a leafy vegetable, which is likely some variant of Chinese cabbage/Wong-Bok/Napa cabbage. This part will have the classic ribbed stems and pale leafy parts seen with these vegetables. This is the same cabbage used in many Kimchi recipes, though these can also contain a bunch of other ...


1

You can leave out the eggs, or replace them with tofu if you want some texture. Replace the chicken stock suggested for a meatless (!) version in the recipe you link to with vegetable stock. If replacing the chicken stock changes the texture of the soup too much, you could add some (vegan) gelatin or similar gelling agent. However, the potato starch n the ...


1

I think that is daikon, which has many names including several that include the word "radish".


0

I agree with the others about cooking quickly, rinsing in cold water and stirring through oil. Another consideration is your heat source. Most homes do not have even a quarter the heat of a commercial wok furnace. Chinese Cantonese people call this heat ‘wok hei’ and it can’t be replicated at home. This is how Chinese restaurants can cook it so quickly, so ...


4

The flavour of "pepper salt" (椒鹽) is typically Chinese five-spice, usually a combination of star anise, Sichuan peppercorns, cinnamon, fennel, and cloves. As @user3528438 pointed out in comments, the fresh pepper as a vegetable is not relevant to that flavour. @Cascabel also pointed out that bell peppers, although lacking in spiciness, are not lacking in the ...


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