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20

The part that handles the food is comparable, as you noted: A container for the hot oil plus a basket to lift the food out again. But the difference is in the periphery: A chip pan is just a pan (or what you may also call a pot), but the heating is done on the stove, like for all other pots. A deep fryer has its own heating system, either via a heated ...


11

Potato chips have to be fried in lots of oil. If you are using little, you are doing it wrong and your chips are less tasty than they could be. As Preston Fitzgerald mentioned in a comment, salt doesn't dissolve in oil. It could be that it will fall to the bottom. Alternatively, the convection in the hot oil could move it around. But still, the salt will ...


10

Here, check this out. This is an article explaining at length how to make perfect French fries. How to make perfect McDonald's style French Fries So basically, you have to cut your fries so that they are 1/4 inch thick an then blanch them in boiling vinegared water (1 tablespoon per quart of water) for about 10 minutes. This has to be done to keep the ...


8

You could put them in a pan of boiling water for 3 or 4 minutes (not so to they're cooked through) before putting them in the oven. The potato on the outside of the wedges will soften and cook a little bit which will help the outsides crisp up a little. Make sure you allow them to drain completely before you put them in the oven.


7

I'm not clear on what you are trying to achieve with the dehydrator. I see three options for you. Option 1: no dehydrator, just deep fry in oil. This is probably the most traditional. Option 2: use the dehydrator briefly (a matter of 10 - 30 minutes) to dry the potato slices. This would create less splattering when frying. Option 3: Cook the potato ...


6

The resting is probably to hydrate to the dough, which will inhibit spreading. See https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/29298/14401. The bringing back to room temperatre is probably for one of four reasons: To help ensure you are baking each tray at a consistent temperature Colder dough will cook on the outside a bit more before cooking through, so they ...


5

According to Food Lab, the chemical that causes browning in homemade potato chips is tyrosinase. That article contains some really nice pictures to help demonstrate the value of soaking. Like this one: Interestingly, after some experimentation, Kenji discovers a technique of first boiling the raw potato in a vinegar solution, drying, and then frying. ...


5

There are lots of recipes for oven-"fried" sweet potato chips (crisps) and fries (chips) and I'll let you search that part. I've noticed a wide variation in recommended oven temperatures, from as low as 350 to as high as 450. Though I've never had great success with crispiness, my overall best results were with a temp of 425. Crispiness with sweet potatoes ...


5

Assuming you're talking about Walker's brand, we can see the following ingredients list from Tesco.co.uk (should match what's on your bag): Prawn Cocktail Seasoning contains: Flavouring, Sugar, Glucose, Salt, Citric Acid, Potassium Chloride, Dried Yeast, Dried Onion, Vale of Evesham Tomato Extract, Colour (Paprika Extract), Sweetener (Sucralose) ...


5

There is no one answer, as each manufacturer has different processes Most flavours are simple esters, acids, and salts that mimic the main flavour notes of the food being replicated. Some high quality chips will use actual freeze dried powders made from the actual food e.g. Ham powder = the good stuff is freeze dried and then powdered real ham, the other ...


5

I don't think there is an English word for these. It seems as though we just call them by their Indian name, of which there are several. Pappadam and Appalam seem to be the most common names, although in different regions of India the name can vary slightly. In the picture you posted these are referred to as Round Chips, at least according to one merchant. ...


4

I am going to get "unsciency" as I used to make fries for hours on end at a local mom and pop shop. How thin / thick doesn't really matter, you'll just have to adjust your frying time accordingly. 1) Use a starchy potato 2) slice your potato evenly, with a peeler if you don't have a slicer or mandolin 3) soak them in water for 30 mins with a pinch of ...


4

To make seasoned salt, just put salt and dry spices into a spice grinder. A lot of times they have an additive that makes this salt/powder stick to chips. Also if you are frying them salt and seasoning will stick to them for a few moments after they come out of the fryer.


4

Add the flavouring later in the cooking process e.g. For a 7 minute cook; at the 4 minute mark, remove from oven, brush/spray with oil and sprinkle on flavouring (herbs etc), and quickly return to oven to finish cooking Experiment with the time point, you are trying to crisp the bread, and bake on oil/herb mix Commercially each flavouring is applied at it'...


4

Crush them and use them as a breading for deep fried meat.


4

Another way to achieve what you're looking for... My mother in law will cut her beans and add salt to them. Because the beans have been washed in water, there's enough water to dissolve the salt. She'll then deep fry the beans for a specific dish, and when the beans are done frying, they're salty enough. She does this with eggplant and bitter gourd as well, ...


4

The operative word in prawn cocktail crisps is cocktail. They're essentially Marie Rose sauce flavour, there's barely any prawn notes. Marie Rose sauce is usually tomato ketchup, mayo, a little Worcestershire Sauce, and cayenne. Should be easy to replicate at home.


4

very very fresh fish won't smell fishy, and the fishy smell comes from proteins breaking down with age. Texture also degrades and becomes softer with fish that isn't fresh, so what you're describing fits perfectly with this new shop just serving fresher fish.


4

Not sure if this qualifies for an answer since I had never done beetroot chips. If not I would be happy to remove it. I had success with parsnip and apple chips: dip in 65°C dilute citric acid solution for 2-3 minutes (inhibits maillard), diluted vinegar or lemon juice works too dry chips well on kitchen towel and place neatly on an oven tray without ...


4

Reformed This is most often used to describe meat products such as "reformed ham" or "reformed scampi". You can occasionally see onion rings made with chopped onion described as reformed, e.g. here. Pringles could be described as "reformed potato snacks" for example. Pringles are less than half potato though, so that may not be entirely accurate. As for ...


3

35% by weight is extremely optimistic considering that an average potato is 75% water (according to a number of internet sources). If you don't peel the potatoes and they're 100% usable (no bruising, no black spots) really 25% is the best you can hope for in potato weight. Obviously, you want as little of the final weight as possible to be oil, both because ...


3

I would also agree with other people's suggestions of par-boiling for 7-10 mins, followed by a shake. In addition I would get the oil hot before adding the potato. Either put the tray with the oil in the oven a few minutes before cooking or pre-heat the tray & oil on top of the hob before transferring to the oven (make sure your baking tray can withstand ...


3

After boiling for a few minutes in water, drain, put the lid on and shake (but gently so the wedges don't break). This will rough up the surface. The resulting bumps can heat through more fully and lose more moisture, leading to crisp.


3

Cooking times are related to the type of tissue. A potato is a part of a plant, but an unusual one, an asexual bud. A potato is not a stem or leafy part of a plant, so it's not a vegetable. It contains no seeds, so it is not a fruit. It lacks the protection of an external fruit sheath, and it isn't a fertilized ovum, so it isn't an underground seed like ...


3

Potatoes need to be cooked before they are edible (or at least palatable). Dehydrators only remove water from food, it does not cook the food. So if you want to crisp potato chips, without frying it in oil, you might try steaming potato slices (slice them thicker than normal so that they will hold shape after steaming. About 10 minutes of strong steaming ...


2

Canada sells ketchup chips all the time. You could buy some there if you're close to the border. Otherwise you could buy ketchup powder and sprinkle those on regular potato chips, or buy some at ebay/amazon.


2

Looks like the preferred potato for the Netherlands and Belgium is Bintje, that one is being mentioned in various places. It also seems that a slightly floury potato gives better results than a waxy one.


2

Not to reduce Elendi's answer, which I am sure is fine, as I am not familiar with UK products: There is no standardization of the terms like "semi-sweet" or "bittersweet" in the US, either informal or regulatory. The sweetness level is not the only thing that varies with chocolate (or chocolate chips). One of the most important variables is whether or ...


2

Yes, dark chocolate of around 35-60% cocoa is essentially semisweet. Higher cocoa percentages are bittersweet.


2

Kenji Lopez-Alt has published one of his magnificent Food Lab articles on the potato chips, with the goal of light colored potato flavor like his favorite brand, while having the robust crunch of kettle chips. He points out that when fried, potato chips undergo several processes: They dehydrate Oil enters the empty spaces left by water Sugars, starches and ...


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