35

I don't know about perfectly round, but you can do better. Stick toothpicks in the truffles before dipping. Dip them using the toothpick, let it drip enough to make sure there's not a ton of excess, probably while spinning it a bit to let it cool slightly and make sure it doesn't all accumulate in one place. Then stab the other end of the toothpick into ...


29

There are a lot of good answers here for simple methods to do a bit better, but I thought I'd add a couple ideas for getting closer to professional quality results. Tempering Anytime you buy chocolate-coated truffles, they'll be coated in tempered chocolate. Tempering is a process of encouraging the formation of the "right" structure in chocolate that will ...


8

Ganache is a mixture of cream and chocolate, made by heating the cream and mixing in the chocolate until smooth and fully incorporated. Butter is then often added to give the final product a characteristic "shine". Ganache can be used as a filling or as a coating/topping in truffles and is a frequent component in other desserts. I've encountered "...


8

Don't use a spoon for dipping the truffles -- use a fork. This allows you to give them a shake, and get the majority of the chocolate off the truffle, leaving a consistent thickness of chocolate coating (assuming your chocolate is at a temp where it's flowing well) Then use a toothpick or a skewer to knock the coated truffle onto your waxed paper, or do ...


7

If I had to guess I would say your filling is not cold enough when you dip it so it starts to melt and pockets of air form when it comes into contact with the warm chocolate, which then doesn't cover the egg properly, causing filling to leak when it warms up a bit. Try putting the fillings in the freezer for a bit (30 minutes to an hour) after you've shaped ...


6

There are two things to keep in mind while melting chocolate: Keep a low uniform heat I start off the melting process with low to medium heat. Once the chocolate fully melts, I reduce the heat to low and keep gently stirring all the while. If you allow the chocolate to cool, it separates out into non-uniform areas of heat, and the cooler pockets start ...


4

The commercial method would involve rolling - if you keep the confection moving as it cools it will end up more-or-less spherical even if you start with a cube. Coat core -> chill with air -> move to rollers. Obviously temperature control is critical, as is the size, shape, velocity etc of both the product and the equipment. As mentioned, this is rather ...


3

A simple solution would be to let them partially cool on the wax paper. Aim for them to be mostly hardened but still pliable. Then, carefully pick them up and roll them between your palms (latex gloves would be a very good idea). This should smooth the outer layer and allow you to get them much closer to spherical. I believe this is the same method ...


2

If you use a toothpick when dipping the truffels you can remove the excess by spinning them, after you have the desierd shape you can dip them in cold water which will set the chocolate. Allow them to cool proberly then remove them from the toothpicks. You can then, with a heated implement, seal the holes made by the picks and smooth over any imperfections. ...


2

I came looking for prevention - frequently happens to me too, without alcohol (in the truffles; I haven’t noticed that a glass of wine in me makes a difference). I do have a works-every-time solution, at least: mayonnaise method, per Alice Medrich: regardless of the amount of ganache you are trying to fix, bring 3-4 Tb cream to a simmer. Pour it into a ...


2

Some basic math, assuming spherical candy and the type of foil that fits snugly w.o. twisting the ends (like thin aluminum foil): 3" foil -> covers 0.95" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for scant 3/4" balls 4" foil -> covers 1.27" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for 1" balls 6" foil -> covers 1.91" candy w.o. overlap -> aim for 1.5" balls I figured 3.14 for Pi would ...


1

I have not made explicitly what you're asking for, but I regularly freeze ganache, with no ill effects. Just be careful when you thaw them. Don't leave them out 'naked' in room temperature air, or you will get condensation on them.


1

The way I've rescued a ganache is to use an immersion blender to pummel the mixture... it's amazing how it can turn a grainy, oily mixture into a perfectly smooth, shiny ganache. Always give this a go before throwing away a mixture.


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