29

Simple: it has no water. Chocolate is a suspension of cocoa solids and sugar in cocoa butter. It is made from fat and carbohydrates only. Bacteria, as everything else, need water to live. They can't survive in something hygroscopic (like jam or honey) or something with no water at all (flour, chocolate, pure fat). Similar for molds. So, independent of ...


27

When making chocolate the cocoa beans are fermented, roasted, and crushed/ground. They are then sent through huge presses that separate the cocoa butter from the cocoa powder. Chocolate is cocoa butter that has been emulsified with varying quantities of powder and usually a ton of sugar and sometimes milk. The rolling of the chocolate with the butter to ...


25

White chocolate by regulation is at least 3.5% milk fat and 14% milk solids. As far as I know, the EU uses the same definition as the FDA (US). So, nothing vegan can legally be sold as "white chocolate". That said, there are a great many non-dairy white chocolate substitutes, usually made with any combination of soy milk, maltodextrin, vanilla, and ...


23

Doing both is possible, but there is no point. For both, you need a conche, and this is a good contender for a gadget not worth its shelf space in a home kitchen. For a good chocolate, you have to mix the melted combination of base chocolate and additional ingredients for hours (Wikipedia says 6 for low quality, up to 78 for best quality), and this is what ...


22

Very simple: don't store your chocolate in the fridge. The ideal temperature for setting chocolate is 20°C. You can store it at less or more than that, but not too much. Setting in the fridge results in bad chocolate. Remember, when you work with chocolate, exact temperatures are extremely important. Here a loose translation from a good article on ...


21

The simple approach is to skip the wire rack and place the dipped confections on parchment paper, waxed paper or a silicone mat. (Some use plastic wrap or aluminum foil, but this may stick as well. Oiling helps.) After cooling, they should come off easily. However, there’s a chance of them developing “feet” when the runoff pools on the parchment, especially ...


20

Hello JoeHobbit, I have got two possible explanations for the connection between the word Chinquapin and chocolate. First of all, the way I read your question; making chocolate out of Chinquapin, you are asking about a possible substitute; called Chinquapin, for cocoa mass, chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, and/or cocoa butter, to make a confectionary ...


19

The short answer is that good quality chocolate has a high proportion of cocoa constituents with little or no substitution. What to look for: High cocoa solids content. Chocolate with less than 50% cocoa solids will have little real chocolate taste and those with more than 70% will have a much more complex and fine chocolate taste. Cocoa butter content. ...


18

Cocoa powder is sometimes added to regular chili because the bitter earthiness compliments the dark chilies. White chicken chili only contains green chilies and has no complex flavor to compliment. White chocolate might make your chili creamier but there are cheaper ingredients that do that better.


17

Every time I make brownies, I always get compliments on how fudgy they are. There may be some variations based on the recipe you use, but the three things I've found to be most important in my experience are: Don't even think about using a boxed/pre-made mix! Bake from scratch - it adds a whole 3-5 minutes of extra prep time for brownies, but the taste and ...


17

Functionally, it should work out fine; but it is not an exact substitute. Based on the fact that your recipe gives you a tolerance for both strength and quality of the chocolate I would say it is probably fine to proceed boldly with your plan to mix the two. You might try a small sample melt first (as suggested here) by mixing an equal but smaller amount ...


16

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


16

What you're seeing is called chocolate bloom. It doesn't happen because of tempering, it happens in spite of it (or sometimes due to improper tempering). Sugar bloom is pretty straightforward - it happens due to moisture exposure (e.g. condensation) causing dissolution and re-crystalizing of the sugar on top. You can easily check if you have sugar bloom by ...


15

During baking, all of the nice "tempered" crystals that come in the chocolate chips are melted out. The chocolate loses its temper, if you will. When the chocolate solidifies again, it does so with different crystals that result in a softer chocolate with a lower melting point.


15

This Chocolate is Van-Leer semi sweet. It was an old American chocolate manufacturer that was recently purchased by Callebaut. It does have a distinct slab style. This is available in the bulk section at Winco. Here's a picture: You can also order it online here


15

White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder. You will just add cocoa butter (fat) and sugar. I believe it will be useless in your chicken chili.


15

You can pretty much substitute coffee with roasted grain coffee-like powder of any brand you like. It works as a drop-in replacement in drinks and foods really well. After all, coffee is just a roasted grain, too. If you need instant coffee, one that dissolve in water or baked goods, I know for a fact that Inka brand makes instant roasted grain "coffee" ...


14

I think it is more likely that the pastry chef employed a piece of food grade acetate (the link is a sample vendor). They would have piped the pattern of tempered white chocolate onto the acetate sheet, then rolled it into a cylinder (chocolate on the inside) taping or clamping it shut to set. Once thoroughly chilled, they would have very, very carefully ...


13

It's not. The original consumers of chocolate, the Native Americans, had their chocolate in bitter teas and savory moles. They mainly were after its caffeine effects. We could speculate about the overuse of sweeteners in general, especially among peoples of European descent. Other ingredients like mint, cinnamon, and cardamon come to mind. In the European ...


12

Spanish hot chocolate and Italian cioccolata fiorentina both use cornstarch as a thickening agent. Both are used more for dipping or sipping (churros in the former case), however you could easily just use less cornstarch to make it more 'drinkable'. Try a teaspoon of cornstarch, mixed with a little cold water, added to the milk when you boil it. As Kate ...


12

Chocolate is in is most essential form made up of cocoa butter and cocoa solids. The chocolate you buy is tempered, the crystals in the cocoa butter are aligned and properly formed, this is what keeps it shiny and gives it a snap. When the chocolate melts, without tempering, in the cookie the crystals in the cocoa butter melt but do not form properly again, ...


12

Its called chocolate blooming. There are two types: Fat blooming - cause is not known for certain, but probably the type VI chocolate crystals are more thermodynamically favored, so spontaneous conversion (and exit from the surface of the solid solution constituting the chocolate body) may be possible. Sugar blooming - the sugar in the chocolate is ...


12

Mole is often made with unsweetened chocolate or cocoa powder. No added sugars are involved. (There is a tiny amount of natural sugar in the cacao, about 1%.) Chocolate is not absolutely necessary in mole. Mole verde generally does not contain chocolate; some recipes for mole rojo also leave it out. You could simply leave out the cocoa from a mole recipe, ...


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that we'...


11

Gravity is making the petals open. If you look at the shape of the petals their center of gravity is towards the outside of the bowl, but they are being held in place by something underneath. I suspect that it's simply one piece of chocolate melted onto another. When the custard (warm or hot) is poured on it melts the bonds holding the petals in place ...


11

Absent the cake portion, the ingredients are precisely as listed for the Waitrose White and Dark Chocolate Tiramisu. Recipe and image courtesy of Waitrose.com As @ChrisH has suggested, someone may have been modifying the recipe to use ready-made cake, such as a Madeira. Coffee chocolate syrup 200ml strong coffee 1 tbsp demerara sugar 75g plain ...


11

I think you have three options. Mole doesn't require chocolate. Find a recipe that doesn't have any. This recipe on Epicurious doesn't have chocolate, though they address that by noting that their inclusion of ancho chiles gives the chocolate flavor (I haven't tried any of these recipes, so don't take this as endorsement of them). Ancho chiles — large, ...


11

One thing you can put them on is teflon cooking liner (example). Chocolate doesn't dry by evaporation but but cooling, so you don't need airflow underneath. You can put this on top of a cooling rack or any flat surface. It's very non-stick, but because it's flexible if any chocolates do stick you can peel the sheet of the chocolate rather than the other way ...


11

If you look at how boxed cake mixes do it, you'll get the right idea. They combine the dry ingredients and you have to add the wet ingredients. There are a couple of good reasons for this: spoilage (not too much of a problem if you're taking about a couple of days in the fridge); and gluten formation, which requires water and will give a tough, bready ...


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


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