28

There’s a good chance that the difference of what will be perhaps half a tablespoon just won’t matter in the final product. You don’t say what exactly you are going to make, but if your recipe was so sensitive to minute inaccuracies, it would probably be weight-based for all ingredients, including the eggs. If you really feel your batter is too dry, add a ...


26

Take a plastic zip top bag, and put it inside a pint glass or tall quart size container. Fold the top of the bag down over the outside of the mug/container. Essentially, you're just using the mug to hold the bag up and open. After you've melted your chocolate, dump it into the bag, squeeze out extra air, and zip the top closed. You've got a single use pastry ...


26

The problem is the “small amount of oil”. If you measured wrong or just eyeballed it, you now have a chocolate spread instead of a solid coating. Storing the cookies in the fridge may or may not be enough to solidify the chocolate coating, but apart from that, there’s nothing you can do to change the chocolate. Depending on what matches the cookie flavor, ...


22

One classic solution is to make a ganache to make the chocolate liquid. Ganache is an emulsion that suspends the cocoa butter in water which helps it mix with the coffee. While this sounds fancy, you can make it in a few minutes. The recipe I use is from The Blue Bottle Craft of Coffee by James Freeman Put 3 oz (85 g) coarsely chopped dark chocolate in a ...


21

The simple approach is to skip the wire rack and place the dipped confections on parchment paper, waxed paper or a silicone mat. (Some use plastic wrap or aluminum foil, but this may stick as well. Oiling helps.) After cooling, they should come off easily. However, there’s a chance of them developing “feet” when the runoff pools on the parchment, especially ...


21

Frankly, Hershey's cocoa powder is low quality. Buy a higher quality cocoa. One objective measure is the cocoa fat content. This is from Harold McGee's Keys to Good Cooking, published by The Penguin Press, New York, 2010, p. 476: Higher-fat cocoas make richer dishes. To compare the fat contents of different brands, check their nutrition labels.


21

Consider using fondant toppings. Fondant is a confectionery topping with a consistency similar to modelling clay. It should be possible to cut a sheet of it into shapes such as firearms, bombs, military vehicles, destroyed buildings, flags, et cetera, or to hand-mold it into appropriate shapes. It's often used on cakes, and it should work well enough on ...


18

Cocoa powder is sometimes added to regular chili because the bitter earthiness compliments the dark chilies. White chicken chili only contains green chilies and has no complex flavor to compliment. White chocolate might make your chili creamier but there are cheaper ingredients that do that better.


17

Functionally, it should work out fine; but it is not an exact substitute. Based on the fact that your recipe gives you a tolerance for both strength and quality of the chocolate I would say it is probably fine to proceed boldly with your plan to mix the two. You might try a small sample melt first (as suggested here) by mixing an equal but smaller amount ...


17

If convenience is your priority, then making an emulsion might not be the best solution. I would recommend making a chocolate syrup to mix into your coffee. A recipe based on water or milk with cocoa powder rather than chocolate will produce the best result mixed into coffee. Using a good quality cocoa powder will produce a very tasty result. Most coffee ...


16

What you're seeing is called chocolate bloom. It doesn't happen because of tempering, it happens in spite of it (or sometimes due to improper tempering). Sugar bloom is pretty straightforward - it happens due to moisture exposure (e.g. condensation) causing dissolution and re-crystalizing of the sugar on top. You can easily check if you have sugar bloom by ...


15

White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder. You will just add cocoa butter (fat) and sugar. I believe it will be useless in your chicken chili.


15

You can pretty much substitute coffee with roasted grain coffee-like powder of any brand you like. It works as a drop-in replacement in drinks and foods really well. After all, coffee is just a roasted grain, too. If you need instant coffee, one that dissolve in water or baked goods, I know for a fact that Inka brand makes instant roasted grain "coffee" ...


14

This Chocolate is Van-Leer semi sweet. It was an old American chocolate manufacturer that was recently purchased by Callebaut. It does have a distinct slab style. This is available in the bulk section at Winco. Here's a picture: You can also order it online here


13

Sugar won't dissolve in cocoa butter. Or in coconut oil, for that matter. When making chocolate, the sugar is smoothed and kept in suspension by prolonged grinding, conching, which is really a mechanical process... and one of the reasons making actual chocolate at home is very rare, absent specialized equipment, as the sugar crystals will not dissolve and ...


13

It's not. The original consumers of chocolate, the Native Americans, had their chocolate in bitter teas and savory moles. They mainly were after its caffeine effects. We could speculate about the overuse of sweeteners in general, especially among peoples of European descent. Other ingredients like mint, cinnamon, and cardamon come to mind. In the European ...


13

First, pick a scale and more detailed theme: I'd go for battlefield scale, so a person would be an inch or two high (3-5cm). This means you can cast moulds from toys. A few soldiers might need to be made, not easy but they don't have to be great. Otherwise go for life size. Make each brownie the right proportions and shape, helped by fondant, for a ...


12

Mole is often made with unsweetened chocolate or cocoa powder. No added sugars are involved. (There is a tiny amount of natural sugar in the cacao, about 1%.) Chocolate is not absolutely necessary in mole. Mole verde generally does not contain chocolate; some recipes for mole rojo also leave it out. You could simply leave out the cocoa from a mole recipe, ...


11

Gravity is making the petals open. If you look at the shape of the petals their center of gravity is towards the outside of the bowl, but they are being held in place by something underneath. I suspect that it's simply one piece of chocolate melted onto another. When the custard (warm or hot) is poured on it melts the bonds holding the petals in place ...


11

Absent the cake portion, the ingredients are precisely as listed for the Waitrose White and Dark Chocolate Tiramisu. Recipe and image courtesy of Waitrose.com As @ChrisH has suggested, someone may have been modifying the recipe to use ready-made cake, such as a Madeira. Coffee chocolate syrup 200ml strong coffee 1 tbsp demerara sugar 75g plain ...


11

Yes, you absolutely can (Lindt dark chocolate bars work just fine). Whether you can temper chocolate is simply a matter of whether there's enough cocoa butter (the fat that is actually crystallizing during the tempering process). You will want to have at least ~30% cocoa butter by mass if you want to temper the chocolate, but even 20% will work. When you ...


11

I think you have three options. Mole doesn't require chocolate. Find a recipe that doesn't have any. This recipe on Epicurious doesn't have chocolate, though they address that by noting that their inclusion of ancho chiles gives the chocolate flavor (I haven't tried any of these recipes, so don't take this as endorsement of them). Ancho chiles — large, ...


11

One thing you can put them on is teflon cooking liner (example). Chocolate doesn't dry by evaporation but but cooling, so you don't need airflow underneath. You can put this on top of a cooling rack or any flat surface. It's very non-stick, but because it's flexible if any chocolates do stick you can peel the sheet of the chocolate rather than the other way ...


11

If you look at how boxed cake mixes do it, you'll get the right idea. They combine the dry ingredients and you have to add the wet ingredients. There are a couple of good reasons for this: spoilage (not too much of a problem if you're taking about a couple of days in the fridge); and gluten formation, which requires water and will give a tough, bready ...


11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


11

If you are not watching calories, and want a treat, use good quality chocolate ice cream. Add a shot or two of espresso, stir, add milk to taste. The result is a very rich chilled mocha drink.


11

The problem is not the chocolate, it is the temperature. I don't know what exactly you refer to by "the temperature of starch gelatinization" - the gelatinization of starch is a long, continuous process, that happens long after the starch has swollen and thickened. It is the process that is responsible for bread going stale - but not the process of ...


10

This is a basic fact of food safety. It doesn't matter how long each of the ingredients take to go bad separately. Prepared food will go bad soon unless you do something special to preserve it. In your case, you had hazelnuts, which don't go bad because 1) they have too little water, and 2) bacteria cannot enter their tissue, which is made of intact cell ...


10

I wouldn't. The purpose of the chocolate in a regular chili is the bitterness and flavor that come from the cocoa solids. (I use cocoa powder in my own chili - never so much that the chocolate flavor is discernable, and never a sweetened chocolate. I'll use 100% unsweetened chocolate if I have it on hand.) White chocolate - even the real stuff with cocoa ...


9

I have seen this happening more than once. While I don't know the whole theory behind it, each time it happened, there was something just below the hole, let's call it "the lump". What I think happens is that the lump is too heavy. When the batter below it tries to rise, it doesn't have the strength to push up the lump. This could be combined with ...


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