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19

It depends on what cuisine it is, though all chutneys and relishes are used as condiments/sides. In European cuisine, chutneys tend to be jammier and involve fruit of some kind. Relishes, like Elendil mentions, are usually made from pickled vegetables. As far as I have experienced, the chutney moniker is used when non traditional ingredients are involved ...


17

Chutney is a fairly generic term, so your confusion isn't too surprising - the definition may also vary from region to region, and it's a loanword. It's generally defined as a condiment consisting of some combination of vegetables, fruits, herbs, and/or spices. (So by definition, it's intended to be paired with other foods.) This means they're usually fairly ...


17

Basically, a chutney is a kind of savoury jam. This is a very simplistic definition though. The main differences between jam and chutney are as follows: The preservation in jam is only by sugar. In chutney, vinegar and sugar are used together, so chutneys are not necessarily sweet. Jam is almost always made with fruit as the main ingredient. In chutney,...


10

As far as I'm aware, the traditional Greek tzatziki doesn't generally include mint at all. It's a cucumber dip that is made of yogurt and sometimes includes dill or mint as a flavoring: Tzatziki (Anglicized: /tsɑːtˈsiːki/ }; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici]) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained ...


8

It's doubtful that you'll get any spoilage in your freezer. Not much grows at -20°C, with or without liquid. Your chutney is likely not freezing because of its high sugar content: Freezing Point Depression. That's perfectly normal behavior.


8

First, let me sympathise with your excruciating social predicament. However, it really was avoidable, since you are both correct. While there is no official ruling on the matter, it is reasonable to say that a chutney is a type of relish. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a relish (in the sense of a foodstuff) thuswise: orig. U.S. A piquant or spicy ...


7

Chutney is a blend of ...things, with quite a sharp taste. It can be sweet(tamarind) or savory(chilly), cooked(mango) or uncooked(chilly). Generally its a mash of spices and herbs (common ingredients being green mint, green/dry coriander, red/green chillies, garlic). Sometimes thin yogurt may be added. Some chutneys can be cooked, like chutney made of ...


7

Mint chutney is normally almost all herbs (mint and cilantro), and it's ground/blended so it's completely green: (from this mint chutney recipe) I can't really see the chutney/dip in your picture that well. You say it was mint and yogurt, and it looks like it might be pale green, so I'd guess it just had overall more yogurt than usual. But as long as it's ...


7

You leave it at whatever temperature is adequate for the food (or stage of food) that is left aside. If you are canning your chutney, then all stages before going into the canner need refrigeration, and all stages after getting out of the canner are safe at room temperature. So, if the recipe wants it to be done before canning, you have to put it in the ...


6

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


6

I believe you meant "Jaggery" (aka Panela) a unrefined cane sugar product. If so, I would suggest a "Muscovado" sugar, as it is whole or partially unrefinued cane sugar. You may need to experiment and blend between dark and medium muscovado to get the taste you desire. I suggest either try a medium brown muscovado or a 1:1 ratio of dark and medium brown ...


6

chutney is an indian cuisine where it consists of spices and other condiments such as vegetables or fruits. Chutneys may be either wet or dry, and they can have a coarse to a fine texture. It is similar to be eaten instead of pickle. chutneys were ground with a mortar and pestle made of stone . Nowadays, electric blenders or food processors can be used as ...


4

We talk about freezing but, really, the benefits come from the low temperature, not from the change from liquid to solid. When you put things in the freezer, it doesn't matter whether they become solid or not: it just matters that they get cold.


4

I make large batches of chutney that I then store in a cryovac bag and keep them in my refrigerator. They last forever. Really, I think I have one that is at least a year old. Other than that, wayfaring stranger is correct about the freezing. It also applies to chocolate sauce and caramel sauce.


4

In my experience, it's pretty broad. They're condiments served with Indian or other South Asian cuisine. Usually served on the side to be added to taste, rather than sauces that are served over food. Most that I have had are sweet, spicy, and/or tart, and can range from thick pastes to fairly thin sauces. There's many many different kinds of chutney from ...


4

turnips will lend the necessary flavor but can be added WITH: Cauliflower or slightly cooked potatoes such as Petite Potatoes (grade C which you can find at a farmer's market but pack some taste...yum), Yukon Gold, New Potatoes, Red Potatoes or Fingerling Potatoes. I know some people who have substituted rutabagas in recipes with the stronger portions of ...


4

I had the same dilemma. Last year I used the plums from my plum tree to make a lot of plum jam and (as an afterthought) only one jar of plum chutney. Most of the jam went into the freezer. I ate one jar of it but I don't eat jam much so the remaining jam has been sitting in the freezer for nearly a year! However the chutney went VERY quickly as I like it ...


3

Apple cores contain more pectin than the rest of the apple, so including the cores will likely get you a thicker, more gelled chutney. With enough cooking they'll indeed soften, as long as it's an apple variety that softens when cooked (as opposed to baking varieties that hold their shape) so it's really just the seeds you'd have to worry about. Sounds ...


3

Your requirements are so specific that I would say: don't search for some existing product which has it all, just engineer your own. The simplest would be to take some base which is transparent and does not have a strong color in itself and whose sweetness can be varied. For example, make your own elderflower syrup with whatever proportion of elderflower ...


2

I like all Darin's suggestions, but my contribution (late, as usual) is to suggest using apple or banana to mix with the jam. Core out and chop an apple, microwave it for a minute or two, and you have the perfect "tart balance" material to mix with that jam. If you're feeling lazy, you will find you can separate the flesh from the peel with a spoon after ...


2

I grew up in India. There can be some variations invented outside India. But in Indian context,Chutneys are far different than jam. They are used as a side dish complimenting the main course. And usually had in small amount , served on the (left) side of the dish. They are almost always spicy. Chilli or chilli powder is one of the main ingredient in ...


2

Relish can be very similar to Chutney. However, many people think of relish as the pickled variety - dill pickle relish. Your error was in associating Chutney with a non-indian meal. Nothing to be embarrassed about. There is "English Chutney" like Major Grey which is jam-like, or there is Indian or Asian Chutney which is quite different. True Indian ...


2

Chutney's originally were and still are made with dried and unriped fruits like dried plums, dried apricots, tamarind, and fresh herbs like mint and cilantro. Each made usually separately. However they can be combined like plum and tamarind with ginger, sugar, salt, red pepper to taste and other spices.They are sweet and spicy at the same time. Sugar and ...


2

Chutney is fruit based and has a spicy complexity. Relish is vegetable based and has a pickled profile.


2

Yes, you can add the chutney to the bread dough to produce a more flavorful bread. When you add the chutney depends on exactly how you want it distributed in the bread. If you'd like the chutney flavor to permeate the bread throughout, mix directly in with the wet ingredients during the initial mix. If you prefer to have "streaks" of chutney or layers, ...


2

24 quarts would be about 23 kilos. Xantham gum is generally used for thickening in an amount of .15% to .5% by weight. So the expected range would be 34 to 115 grams. Start small, thickening with xantham gum can get snotty. Work up slowly, mixing thoroughly, until you reach the thickening you want. You may find that a combination of cornstarch and xanthan ...


2

Cranberries (and to a lesser extent, apples) have a great deal of natural pectin, which will make your chutney gel when it is cool or refrigerated. If you want a thinner consistency, you can reheat it and add any complimentary liquid that you desire: apple juice would be fine, but remember, you are diluting the flavor of your chutney with the additional ...


2

Okay, so I think the obvious answer is dandelion jelly. Yes, that is a thing that exists. You could probably safely add some other edible, yellow flowers (like chrysanthemums, maybe? or even some oolong tea?) and almost certainly cut back on the sugar, but that's a little more risky and will require some experimentation. I have added gelatin to my jellies ...


2

Apple jelly with either food coloring or turmeric in it. Not sure if you can just mix stuff into a jar of already made jelly, and keep its nice original texture, but you can make the jelly from apple juice (many recipes available on internet, e.g.: http://www.cooks.com/recipe/x16tm5jm/apple-jelly-from-apple-juice.html) Turmeric has such a strong color, ...


2

Sounds to me like a pineapple jelly would do the trick for you. It stays vibrant yellow, and a jelly instead of a jam would be clear with no floating pieces or chunks. Pineapple is a fairly unusual jelly/jam flavor, but quite good. It makes an interesting but delicious pb&j, and could probably be substituted pretty much anywhere you would use jelly ...


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