29

Coriander leaf/cilantro looks VERY similar to flat leaf parsley. When I have both at the house I sometimes resort to smelling them to know which is which. Cilantro is very strong smelling, and you'd definitely change the flavor of the dish if you left it out. Flat leaf parsley is significantly more subtle and has a much milder flavor and scent. It is not ...


7

Cilantro The leaf on the left is Coriander - it's a slightly lighter green, and has rounder leaves. Botanical Classification Coriandrum sativum is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Uses All parts: leaves, roots, stems and seeds are used in cooking either as a garnish, a key ingredient or as a powder. Regions used/found Native to Southern ...


5

The stems are edible too. They look nicer in the food though if you chop them up a little, instead of leaving the long stems intact. If you are in the habit of making any kind of brothy soup (chicken or other) you can dump a bunch of whole cilantro stems in and then remove after they have imparted their flavor contribution.


5

Frozen supermarket coriander/cilantro is perfectly good to use whilst cooking. Very similar to adding stems for flavour. You'll never get fresh looking leaves to finish the dish from the ice blocks, but stir it in and you will get that background flavour. Delicate leaves, Basil is similar, are either fresh or they aren't. Don't worry too much about the ...


4

Instead of drying the cilantro, why not just plant the other half in good potting mix? You won't have to run to the store for fresh then. It grows quickly too! I have both dry and fresh. The dry doesn't stack up. It has a much less pungent flavour. It's good in a pinch.


4

The stems are edible and flavorful, with a crunch that may or may not be desirable in your dish, but the lower portion of them tends to be a little stringy. I always trim off the bottom, but as for the rest of the stem, it depends on what I am making. For raw dishes where it is chopped quite finely (koshimbir, pico de gallo) or even ground to a paste (...


4

The two are not interchangeable. One is fresh leaves; the other is ground seeds. They don't taste anything like one another. At a push you could use fresh flat-leaf parsley. It would add some 'freshness' to the flavour, but wouldn't be a proper substitute, even then. A late thought - is your ground herb actually labelled 'cilantro', or are you translating ...


4

Fruits are fairly easy to clean things off of, because they tend to have thick rinds and/or hard exteriors (apples, oranges, bananas, etc.); so pesticides sit on top, and we just have to wash them off. Baking soda and water will do that to some extent (plus rubbing, which is quite important!). Greens, though, don't have that kind of exterior. Pesticides ...


4

The stems are commonly recommended as a substitution for cilantro root, which is commonly used (in small quantities, since it is a rather potent aromatic) in thai cuisine.


4

Cilantro is one of the herbs that doesn't retain much flavor when it's dried; it's unlikely to be particularly tasty when made into a tisane. On the other hand, the dried seeds of the plant -- called "coriander (seeds)"* -- have a pleasantly tangy and floral/citrusy taste. They are occasionally used as a flavoring agent in beer, so it's perfectly ...


3

According to this The Hour For Tea blog entry, cilantro is one of several ingredients in a tisane for which it claims some medical benefits (emphasis added): Catnip tea was used as a sedative, along with lavender, chamomile, coriander or cilantro; peppermint could also be used to loosen phlegm, and a tisane of thyme with honey was used as a sore ...


3

Strips of herbs is called a chiffonade: Stack the leaves together. Roll the leaves into a cigar shape Slice across them. I typically use a chef's knife. If I have multiple herbs, I'll wrap the smaller leaves in one of the larger ones. (eg, basil & oregano) If you want it minced, then you should "run your knife through" the pile. Which in expression ...


3

I am one of the people that love the taste of Cilantro (and Coriander) - Cilantro tastes like as if it should be called lemon Parsley to me - so my suggestion would be to replace it half and half with Parsely/Lemon Balm or Pasley/Lemon Thyme depending on the region the dish is from. If it is a SE Asian dish, you might also be able to substitute Lemon Grass ...


3

For most herbs, if the stems are tender, it is fine to just chop and add. Of course it depends on the application. For example, as a garnish, sometimes stems with leaves work, sometimes not. Then, there is also the SE Asian tradition of using stems and roots of cilantro in marinades and rubs (no leaves). My own metric, for almost any herb, is if the stem ...


2

I too have the so-called "soap-gene", but after 8 years living in Mexico, I have come to tolerate cilantro. Still, for several years I sought alternatives. Parsley is not, except visually. A mix of parsley, lemon basil or lime basil, and beet or radish or celery leaves isn't too far off, and lacks the soap thang. A very small bit of yerba buena, mixed ...


2

Coriander/Cilantro is also known as "Chinese Parsley"... which hints that they are similar, but not quite the same. The parsley you likely typically think of has ruffled, curly leaves and is commonly used as a garnish. Cilantro has flatter leaves and stronger flavor and aroma. You may be able to omit the curly parsley without a drastic change in flavor, ...


2

Apart from being green they're quite different, in flavour terms at least. Coriander is deep, earthy, and almost soapy - good with hot and oily food. Parsley - flat not curled which is almost tasteless - is fresh, green and good with fish and cured meats. You can switch but the flavour of the dish will change - if falafel I'd ditch the parsley if I had to ...


2

In most cases, if frozen food has unsatisfactory texture after thawing, the damage has either already been done while freezing (which might depend on the freezing process used - shock frosting vs normal slow freezing, blanching vs no blanching...), or has happened when the product thawed (eg due to bad cooling chain management on the vendor's side, or an ...


2

I pick the prettiest leaves off the stem to use (chopped as necessary) as garnish. Without getting nuts about removing all of the stem (or I do get nuts about it, depending on the dish), I chop up more leaves to use in the dish. What I'm left with is a few leaves and lots of stems. I chop off the root end of the stem (where the stem becomes paler), and then ...


2

The most obvious visual guide would be to look at how the leaves are connected to the main stalk. Look at each joint where the stem is connected to the little branches (petiole?) to the leaves. for coriander, one leave per joint. But for flat parsley, you can see that at each joint, they branch out to a few more leaves, so it's more than one leave per joint. ...


2

Just leaving it out is unlikely to result in a disappointing curry - some commercially sold panang pastes omit the coriander root too. What they do not usually omit, though, is the ground coriander seed that is common in all except gaeng kua paste (which is the simplest form of red curry paste, has no dry spices at all, and makes for a great curry still) and ...


1

One of the easiest methods (for washing produce) is to fill a clean sink a clorox water wash (~1tsp clorox per gallon of water). As for leafy items (like Cilantro and leaf lettuce), swishing it around in the water wash should be sufficient to rinse any sand or silt while exposing those produce items to the sanitizing agent. This method is economical (bleach ...


1

Cilantro (or as the rest of the world calls it, coriander) is one of the most ridiculously applicable cooking herbs I have had the privilege of using. That said, you are correct - when dried, it's application becomes far more limited (to a far greater extent than most other herbs and spices). I have successfully used dried coriander in english stews, ...


1

Cilantro tea is used in several Ayurvedic remedies. You will need approximately 15 minutes to make cilantro tea. Here you can get how to make Cilantro tea.


1

In the US, coriander refers to ground coriander seeds, not coriander leaf. Its a brown powder. The seeds are spherical and slightly larger than peppercorns.


1

I like the comment from @DaveVoutila best. I don't use a paper bag, though - just paper towels. The herbs will eventually wilt, but they'll still be fine for soups, stocks, etc. In fact, in time, they'll become rather similar to dried herbs.


1

Dried cilantro brings a mild herbaceous favor to soups and stews but it is not a substitute for fresh cilantro. If you take the notion of subbing for the fresh stuff off the table, dried cilantro is interesting... I often use both because they bring completely different things to the party.


1

I made home made salsa and used dried cilantro in a tin that I bought from the store. I threw the salsa out and gave my dried cilantro in the spice tin away... It was awful awful awful and didnt taste a thing like fresh cilantro. It ruined mmy salsa... never again will I buy it in the grocery store.


1

Culantro (eryngium foetidum) seems to have many of the flavors of cilantro without the soap taste. I can't say for certainty how similar they are, because the soap flavor is so overwhelming to me. The wikipedia page says that culantro is stronger. (but I can put lots into a dish, and not gag) I have no idea if it would still trigger your dad's allergies, ...


1

For the special case of just using it as a green, herby garnish on top of an asian dish: In some cases, thinly sliced spring onion greens will do fine (different flavor, same function: be green and provide a visual and flavour-wise contrast to the cooked ingredients).


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