46

Cinnamon is the bark of a tree. It is either sold as rolled strips of bark (=cinnamon sticks) or ground. It will not dissolve, neither in water nor in alcohol. What you want to do is basically the same as was done commercially with the vanilla extract you are already using: Extract the taste, then discard the bark itself. Alcohol is a good choice for ...


28

Cinnamon is made from the ground bark of a variety of trees in the Cinnamomum genus. All of these barks contain starches, soluble fibers, and insoluble fibers to some degree. Lower grade cinnamons such as Cinnamomum cassia contain higher amounts of lignins, bassorins, pectins, and mucilages; accounting for almost 80% of the mass of the powdered cinnamon. ...


18

Cinnamon adds a different spice profile than chili powder or red or cayenne pepper would. It is a common savory spice in Indian food and I believe it's also used in savory dishes in Chinese cooking. It's a very versatile spice :). We also use cocoa powder in our chili as it provides a real depth of flavor (dark bitter flavors which are quite good in chili). ...


14

I don't think it will ever dissolve in an edible solution. However it will readily infuse to both water and alcohol. So instead of trying to retain the cinnamon itself in the solution, just infuse it. Once the flavor has made it's way into the alcohol or water then sieve through a fine mesh. You'd be better off doing this with cinnamon sticks as they are ...


13

The reason it tastes sweet is the presence of sugar, ie because it is sweet. Cinnamon is thin tree bark, and it is not uncommon for tree bark, or the layer near the bark to be sweet because of sap. Birch is another example of a tree that is sweet, you can suck on a peeled birch branch for the same reasons as stated in your question.


11

The cinnamon "sludge" is fiber. The fiber that came from the cinnamon is soluble in water. 10 grams of cinnamon is about 8 grams of fiber (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamon). It is safe to eat / drink (fiber!) in moderate amount (Chinese cinnamon or cassia is not safe in high dose because of its toxic component called coumarin). Of course, cinnamon ...


9

Cinnamon itself is the bark of a particular tree, and is not terribly sweet in any objective sense. I cannot think of a single spice that is in itself sweet. Spices are generally aromatic, pungent, or hot, but not sweet. Even vanilla is in fact fairly bitter on its own, as is chocolate before sugar is added. Cinnamon is a warm spice that many cultures ...


8

It is really hard to say anything definite just from the photo, but I would say it's not C. verum. First, cassia (C. cassia) usually has a stronger and more robust flavor than Ceylon cinnamon, rather than the other way around. From the thickness of the bark I would also say that this is cassia or some other species of cinnamon (there are a couple that are ...


8

There are no advantages or disadvantages in this case, it's all about personal preference. Brown sugar and butter will turn into a rich, sweet, syrupy ooze. White sugar will stay more granular and have less depth of flavor, but arguably you may taste more cinnamon that way. You can also mix the two, there's no reason you cannot have half brown and half ...


8

What I learned researching this question: Brown sugar has anywhere from 3.5 - 6.5% molasses depending on whether it is light or dark brown sugar. Molasses is what makes brown sugar brown. Brown sugar has a smaller granule than white sugar. What all this means to a cinnamon roll filling: When brown sugar and cinnamon (and butter) are used in the filling, ...


8

I actually dealt with a very similar problem when I decided it would be nice to have coffee with a cinnamon taste - and of course it is! But I didn't want to buy a flavor syrup, and I had a ton of ground cinnamon available. I eventually settled on adding even just a little bit (less than a teaspoon) of ground cinnamon to the bottom of a coffee filter before ...


8

There aren't really any hard and fast rules when it comes to deciding how much cinnamon to start with. There are certainly considerations when thinking about how much flour, milk, fat etc. to use in recipes and this is thrust of the book to which you refer. Baking is essentially chemistry and you need to get the proportions of the chemicals right to produce ...


7

Looking at the recipe, it appears to be just a basic porridge. So no, I wouldn't say that's unique to Indian Cuisine; wikipedia suggests it's "traditional and common in English-speaking countries, Nordic countries, and Germany". This is specifically rolled-oat porridge: "Rolled oat porridge is common in England, Australia, New Zealand, North America and ...


6

If you never prepared the recipe as written (which appears to be the case), you have no basis to tie the way it tastes when doubled to doubling it, rather than to the proportions of the original recipe. Based on many years of making many things in many sized batches, if I double a recipe and want it to taste the same as the original recipe, I double the ...


5

As Megasaur said, the spice cinnamon (or often, cassia, which is quite similar) is the inner bark of a tree. As a natural product, there is going to be some variation in the color in any case. I would look quite closely at the texture and grain of the differently colored pieces compared to the more normal pieces. If they show the same pattern or ...


5

Imitation cinnamon is primarly pure cinnamaldehyde, or a related chemical. That's chemically identical to what's found in cinnamon sticks and ground cinnamon, so you're not consuming anything you wouldn't also be getting from real cinnamon. It's what produces the piquancy (burn) of cinnamon, as well as the scent and flavor. It's actually probably derived ...


5

I think using a microplane to grate hard spice is only useful for small amount, either it will take you a long time (as you experienced) or will damage your microplane (render it blunt). The best way to grind spices is with a electric grinder (coffee grinder), even with that, grinding harder spices like cinnamon is difficult. https://www.seriouseats.com/...


4

cinnamon is a basis flavor of Cincinnati style chili, it has some inherent heat as well as sweetness to it. Chili benefits from both, but I don't like Cincinnati style chili where you can "taste" the cinnamon. Lots of chili recipes have seemingly odd and unusual ingredients including, jams and jellies, as well as chocolate.


4

Try using cinnamon sticks in place of powders. I have better results, also you can refill your cup of coffee and reuse the cinnamon sticks from your last cup.


4

I often put some of a cinnamon stick in my chilli, along with cardamon and bay leaf. (probably not traditional at all). It adds to the flavor without it becoming desert like. I guess it is because the flavor is infused making it more subtle. I haven't tried using ground cinnamon in a chilli, I should imagine that it would taste as you are describing.


4

From personal experience i can tell you that Cinammon is widely used in persian cooking in stews and curry bases. It pairs up great with other savoury&sweet spices, like saffron and tumric. It also works great with tomato sauce dishes. Most popular example in persian cooking is greenbean polow. Which uses a tomato based sauce with minced meat and is ...


3

It will probably not affect taste, however, it will affect texture. The reason is that the flour will react to the moisture in the batter and start to convert to gluten. This will produce at best a chewier bar (which may actually be desirable) or, at worst, a rock hard bar. If you are willing to take this textural risk, then I would recommend putting ...


3

First of all, are the ingredient lists the same? Sometimes with packaged foods, there are specific differences in formulas for different product lines. If we assume that the formula is the same, it could have more to do with the consistency of the ingredients. The ones that come in a pan get stored in the right shape and probably don't get handled the same ...


3

After having to avoid consuming powdered cinnamon for months, I've recently found out the method to prevent it from turning into a slime when mixed with water or tea (hot or cold). The trick is to mix the cinnamon with honey first. You can mix 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon with a teaspoon or two of honey, and stir it up very well so that the mixture becomes ...


3

Oats is very new to India. I am an Indian and I think oats came to Indian market only 5-6 years earlier. Even now oats is considered food for people who are on diet and still not eaten regularly.Most of my friends do not like the taste and texture of oats. People now have started making Dosas and idlis (traditional Indian breakfast) out of it, replacing rice ...


2

I recently read that Ceylon cinnamon is also safer because Cassia cinnamon most commonly used can be harmful to the liver if taken in doses over 1 teaspoon a day. One website that spoke about its safety and use is WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-cinnamon


2

I read online that cinnamon cuts the acid in tomatoes using 1/4 tsp for a batch of sauce or chili. This was a great tip for me as I didn't like the acidic tomatoe flavour of my chili.


2

No, ground cinnamon won't dissolve in a cocktail like that. I'd use a bit of syrup, extract or cinnamon liqueur instead, perhaps Goldschläger, and plop in a (reusable) cinnamon stick as a garnish.


2

I have a simple answer that I think is ideal. Go to a store such as Whole Food's Whole Body or use Amazon and look for the herbal extract section. I happen to use a cinnamon extract from Herb Pharm that costs around $12 (on Amazon - Whole Body is a bit more). As you can imagine, this is a pure, organic extract of some of the best real cinnamon available. (...


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