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25

How about using orange zest instead of the juice? That way you'll get a lot of the aroma and flavor we think of as "orange" without really changing the sweetness or acidity.


13

No, you can't wash it off. Part of it is probably that washing methods are not fully effective, another part is that there is diffusion into the fruit, and the diffusion is strongest in the uppermost cell layers. In oranges, this is the peel. From Kruve, A., Lamos, A., Kirillova, J., & Herodes, K. (2007, September). Pesticide residues in commercially ...


12

I recently did some experimenting on this exact topic. I can't contribute anything to the safety part of your question, but I have some notes regarding flavor. The experiment: I blind tasted lemon zest in a group of associates and friends with varying degrees of palate development. Most people were able to differentiate between fresh zest with wax and fresh ...


11

The best way to remove wax from citrus is simply to wash it with dish soap under warm, running water. Don't obsess about how long you should wash the fruit; usually the wax application is very thin and quickly removed. There is no easy way to tell whether you have removed the wax, so if you return citrus to fridge after removing the wax, you might want to ...


10

Not the wax is the problem here, but rather the fungicide treatment that accompanies the waxing. In Europe it mostly is done with thiadibendazole. Thiadibendazole is not very soluble in water. When you peel the lemon and eat it, you will only incoroporate a very tiny amount. However it is very soluble in oil, and it is solved in the wax coating and much more ...


10

If the tea was distilled water, a 5% solution would have been sufficient. That is, you'd need 50 grams of acid to 950 grams of water. The problem is, the impurities of the water and the tea itself buffer it somewhat, so it's impossible to predict the exact amount you need. You'll have to use a pH meter, and an accurate one, not strips, to make a pH solution ...


10

You might try zesting the orange, reducing the juice a bit, and then adding the zest to the syrup and then cooking it down a bit more. You may or may not wish to strain it after letting the zest cook for a minute or so. If you do this, take care. I believe cooking it too long will make the zest overly bitter. Alternatively, you could use frozen orange ...


9

There is unlikely to be any single answer to my question since the coating can be any one of a number of substances including, Natural or synthetic resins Carnauba wax Shellac Tall oil Paraffin Oxidised polyethylene Candelilla wax Beeswax Corn, soy or milk proteins These may be disolved in a petroleum based solvent, emulsified with a detergent or modified ...


8

Some fruit juices can be heated to drive off excess water (especially those with a higher sugar content) but citrus doesn't tolerate this well. Fresh-squeezed citrus will get bitter and acrid if reduced. Instead, squeeze your citrus as normal and freeze the juice in an open container. Once it's set into a solid block, place it into a funnel or strainer ...


8

It looks like a honeybell. Also known as a tangelo.


7

I've made a similar cake before - note that it uses clementines, not just any oranges. This is an advantage because their skin is thinner and less bitter than larger oranges. The cooking softens the peel enough to puree smoothly, and helps release the orange flavor from the peel. It's not really about reducing biterness; some of the bitter flavor may be ...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


7

You have a couple of solutions: Make it thicker with agar agar instead of starch Use something like jam or marmalade The latter might be to close of the sugary paste you dislike. However agar agar contrary to starch has a really wide range of thickening. You can just make things from a tiny bit thicker than water to jelly. More over the boiling needed will ...


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


6

Strictly speaking this is not my own answer but partial answers supplied by the US FDA and DG SANCO (the EU Directorate General for Health & Consumers). Here is what they both have to say: DG SANCO's Reply In relation to the waxes used as food additives: Beeswax, white and yellow (E 901), Candelilla wax (E 902), Carnauba wax (E 903), Microcrystalline ...


6

tl;dr: Grapefruit oil is the most likely missing link. Squeeze some grapefruit peels into your mix, or pick up a "food-grade" or "therapy-grade" essential oil (for extremely sparing use). In the absence of more information, I'll go ahead and take a broad pass at this. As I mention in comments, more data will help us get closer. As a starting point, let'...


6

Yes, you can squeeze citrus too much. That bitterness you sometimes taste in citrus fruit comes from limonin, a compound that most people can detect at concentrations as small as a few parts per million. In many citrus fruits the limonin is created once the acids of the juice vesicles interact with LARL, a tasteless substance in the fruit's tissues (...


6

I agree with the suggestion that it is best to buy ripe citrus fruits. I respectfully disagree with the assertion that they don't ripen after picking. I stumbled across this ancient question today and looked at it because I have a lot of very immature oranges that I thinned off my orange tree a few weeks ago, and I wondered what gems of wisdom might have ...


6

Is the wax safe? Coatings used on fruits and vegetables must meet FDA food additive regulations for safety. [ US Food & Drug Administration: http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm114299 ] In the States, at least, it appears that fruit wax is regulated. Now, that doesn't mean it's healthy (cigarettes and gasoline are also regulated), ...


6

The Food and Drug Administration has approved several waxes for such use, made from shellacs, paraffins, palm oil derivatives and synthetic resins. Those ingredients are also in waxes for your car and kitchen floor, but as far as anyone knows, the waxes used on produce are safe. The caveat is necessary because the FDA has never adequately tested them for ...


6

Imazalil is a systemic fungizide that surpresses mold and bacterial growth, for example on the skin of citrus fruits. As it is a known carcinogen, the consumption of citrus peels treated with it is not advisable, as stated here (in German, sorry) for example by the German a.i.d. (Governement supported agency). I could not (yet) find a reliable source ...


6

The only good way I know of to concentrate fresh orange juice and maintain the flavor is by removing the water. But not by heating it, as the heat will destroy the flavor. You need a vacuum distiller or freeze dryer for your orange juice. Pulling a vacuum will boil the juice at room temperature, removing the water without adding any heat.


6

If you are not allergic to citric acid you can use it as a substitute for lemon juice in canning. Related Can I use citric acid instead of lemon juice when canning?


6

Theoretically, you could use a wine, apple, or or other heavy-duty fruit press to press 10-20lbs of citrus at a time. But you wouldn't want to. Both the peels of the citrus and the seeds contain bitter and/or intensely acidic compounds (those essential oils WS talks about in the comments). If you press citrus in any press that uses pressure on the whole ...


5

In my experience, dry wines risk being completely killed by hot food. The classical pairing would be an aromatic white, like Gewürztraminer or Riesling, with substantial sweetness. Germany is the role model here, especially the wines around Spätlese and Auslese levels, with Alsace a close second. (They're also great QPR, but that's a secondary concern.) ...


5

The problem is that you likely cannot afford it. It is done by vacuum, so the machine (rotovap) will cost you about 10 000 dollars, or you can find a few Chinese noname suppliers for maybe 6 000. It is an amazing thing to play with in the kitchen, but it will cover the cost of buying supermarket lemons for several lifetimes. Any conventional ways of ...


5

Heating citrus changes its flavor quite dramatically. When and how much to heat and reduce citrus depends on the outcome you are looking to achieve. If you want to preserve the fresh squeezed flavor, heating is not advisable. If you are looking for a more reduced, cooked down flavor, heating can be good. Certainly, the flavor will be concentrated, but it ...


4

Well, if it comes directly from Southern Italy you could use it to make some Southern Italy specialty like pastiera napoletana, sfogliatelle napoletane or cannoli siciliani, all of which require candied fruits. Traditionally pastiera is done with a mix of candied citron and orange peel plus candied pumpkin (cucuzzata) which however is not the easiest ...


4

While the pith of citrus fruits can be very bitter, there is no juice in it. To extract any liquid from pith would require much more pressure than any squeezing-based juicing equipment at a bar is likely to generate. A centrifugal juicer is more likely to produce a bitter flavor if the pith is included with the fruit, as small bits of pith will end up in the ...


4

Here in Germany, practically all Citrus fruit treated with any artificial coating (usually any combination of Thiabendazol, Orthophenylphenol, Imazalil) comes with a clear statement "Schale nicht zum Verzehr geeignet" - "Peel unsuitable for consumption". One should assume there is a reason behind that very unconditional statement. Most supermarkets here ...


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