58

In addition to the lower heat capacity (see other answer), a main reason, quite counterintuitive, why plastics don't dry well is that they're hydrophobic. That's right: they keep water sticking to them because they're water repellent (but not completely water repellent). The reason for this strange behaviour is that any small amount of water on the surface ...


54

I would rinse well with clear water. Allow to dry thoroughly, and then use as normal. There is a small chance that your pizza stone will impart a soap flavor to your pizza, but I would say that it is worth a couple of pizza cooks to determine if there is a long term problem. It's really not that much of a risk.


50

Causes According to this article the problem seems mainly two fold, conductivity and thermal inertia (among other factors). During washing temperatures get relatively hot (depending on the particular program chosen) to promote sterilization and help with cleaning. Conductivity: Different utensils are made of different materials which will absorb this heat ...


22

By rinsing, you can only remove stuff from the surface and slightly below. You need to remove molecules which sit in the pores of the stone. Chemically, you are working against diffusion and adhesion. By washing with soap, you have deposited a number of molecules onto the stone surface, these have diffused into the numerous pores of the solid. Now, these ...


14

I doubt that there's enough naphthalene deposited on the cutlery to give you severe poisoning, although it may taste bad. Based on the rat/mouse lethal doses, you would need to ingest ~50 gr of the stuff to die from it (of course, you would experience adverse effects at much smaller amounts). It seems like chronic exposure to naphthalene is where you really ...


12

Rinse it thoroughly and just cook some dough on it to throw away (instead of a full pizza with all ingredients). I don't believe the soap will be that resilient to withstand rinse+heat+food on it. It is not designed for that.


11

Wipe your hands with a cloth. If there are still traces of oil, wash your hands but use dish soap. Otherwise, get gloves while doing hands-on baking next time.


10

There are several variables that go into this so I may not touch one the one(s) you are facing but I will try. Some options to help in no particular order: Use a rinse aid. (This would be my first suggestion) Rinse aids are designed to coat dishes and then repel water. It makes drying a snap. The lack of splotching is secondary to me. Use the heat dry ...


5

Fruits are fairly easy to clean things off of, because they tend to have thick rinds and/or hard exteriors (apples, oranges, bananas, etc.); so pesticides sit on top, and we just have to wash them off. Baking soda and water will do that to some extent (plus rubbing, which is quite important!). Greens, though, don't have that kind of exterior. Pesticides ...


5

Chubbyemu keeps me up at a night too. But remember, when you're looking up case studies and very rare stories and situations, they will always be as crazy as possible. If people do get sick from clean containers, they would have used that as the basis for the story, not eating 5 day old pasta. Remember, the point of both internet clickbait stories and ...


4

Adding this answer to provide some (admittedly anecdotal) evidence: I currently own a knife that was given to me by someone else. The previous owner regularly put this knife in the dishwasher. It is not a cheap knife, but from a well-regarded consumer brand (Zwilling-Henckels) I would guess it is of medium to good quality. Two things have happened to this ...


4

There is a device you can buy, known (here in the UK, at least) as a milk saver It comes in glass, ceramic or metal.. I'm sure you could improvise your own if you can't find one. All it is, is a disk about 8cm in diameter, with a recess to collect small bubbles, and a vent on one side of the rim about 1/2 the depth of the recess, to release the accumulated ...


4

One I've never tried - nor needed to, I live in a temperate zone... My aunt lived in Singapore for many years - she would put anything like that, flour or even sugar, into a tin then put the tin on a low heat on the gas & the insects would climb out & fall into the flame. Flour can of course be sieved too, semolina may depend on how fine it is.


4

This will be from an electrochemical reaction between the can (mostly iron I think) and the water and possibly the aluminum (a better chemist than me would be able to tell you). Aluminum has a fairly impermeable mono-molecular oxide layer on its surface (incidentally this is why you can color coke cans and the like; the color is in the oxide layer). The ...


4

In the US, there are business called "sharpening services" that are dedicated to sharpening knives, saws, lawnmower blades, and other tools. You can probably find one in your area by searching google or yelp.


4

If you have a self cleaning oven, run the pizza stone though a cleaning cycle in the oven. The oven will heat up slowly enough to not cause thermal stress in heating. The oven locks for hours to allow for a long cool down cycle to avoid thermal stress when cooling. The stone was manufactured at much higher temperatures than you'll get in an oven. Then I'd ...


3

Open your tap just slightly on lukewarm Rub a decent amount of liquid dish soap on your hands without wetting them first Slowly wet your hands while continuing to rub them Make a praying hand with fingers crossed while continuing to rub Put left hand on top of right hand with all fingers spread and rub in-between fingers Reverse hand and repeat Rub right ...


3

For anyone interested: I ended up scraping the stone with a butter knife and some steel wool, removing all visible plastic, after which I put it in the oven and heated it up to about 275°C. After about an hour it stopped fuming, and from what I can tell there was not much left on it, although it was still kind of black, but not as black as it was when I put ...


3

If you are worried about stains a degreaser will help. There are many soaps on the market that will work in this context. It is important to clean it quick so the stain doesn't have time to get worse. Bleach can help with stains after the fact but can also leave splotching so may not work for you. If on the other hand, if you are referring to the ...


3

Depending on how big your package of sweets is, you might be able to get a sort of "moat" around it. Put it in a dish of water, but on/in a second containment to keep the water off the sweets themselves. My husband does this with the jar of honey and it works great. I guess ants don't like to swim.


3

You need to place them in something ants can't get into. A box, jar, or sealed plastic bag should to the trick. Note that as @joe points out in the comments, whatever you use has to seal tightly, and the plastic bags have to be thick.


3

Basically you need to turn it off, remove everything from it and then thoroughly clean it using a solution of warm water and baking soda. Baking soda will help remove/absorb any odors that have leeched into the fabric of the fridge. Once that is done and it has completely dried, you can restock the fridge, examining carefully anything you are putting back ...


3

A couple of things that might help help on this one: If your machine has a few dried pasta crumbs on it, just leave it out to dry and knock / pick the dried dough out with a brush or a chopstick. Don't worry too much about any crumbs of dried egg dough making you sick. You are going to boil whatever noodles you make for at least 3 minutes, aren't you? If ...


2

A bigger pot is absolutely possible. I used to make paneer from 4.5 litres of milk in a 5l (actually about 5.2l) stock pot. Even the thermal expansion made it precarious. So I bought a bigger pan, 8 or 10l. But you still have to keep an eye on it, unless you actually plan to boil it down, which is rare, and when then you'll want to reduce the heat ...


2

If it still feels greasy, put a bit of baking soda into and leave it alone for awhile. It will absorb the excess grease and then you can lightly wash it out again rinse it out and put it away.


2

According to thekitchn, Here's what's happening in that little pot: As milk heats, the water in its structure starts evaporating from the surface. This concentrates the remaining fat and proteins into a thicker layer at the top of the pot. This layer eventually becomes so thick that water vapor rising through the milk can't break through very easily ...


2

You can just keep the wooden stick on the vessel and carry on with your work. You can also prevent milk boiling over by applying some cooking oil on edge of the vessel. more.....


2

The same issue exists with paint cans: the trough in the rim fills up with paint. Solution there: bang two or three nail holes in the trough so the paint can drain back into the can. The lid will cover the nail holes when replaced. This should work for syrup too.


2

Try washing or changing the kitchen curtains, towels, pillows on the chairs, and any other porous material that was in the kitchen. The material has absorbed the smell and it will not go away unless you use soap and water. I would even consider scrubbing the wall just in case from the fumes. Don't cover smells with other scents, that doesn't solve the issue.


2

It is safe If you use it properly and follow the instructions. When I clean my oven with those products, I make certain it is well wiped cleaned with clean water after and I will let the oven run empty for a little to make certain that if there's some left over product, it will be evaporated.


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