44

Try searching for "pan scrapers." I have a pair from Lodge that has served me well, though you can find almost identical scrapers without the branding. These are essentially equivalent to the scrapers mentioned by ChrisH, but with curves to make it easier to clean the edges of your pans


35

For most of the removal, leverage rather than brute force will give more control, so you don't accidentally pull the last bit off. At the end while pulling gently on the ring, rock the lid from side to side, so you're only trying to open one side of the remaining seam. It's much less likely to flick that way. While my right hand does that, my left hold the ...


20

Alternatively (with respect to @GdD's answer), let it dry out completely. Totally dry dough doesn't stick all that well to many surfaces (glass, plastic, non-stick). It then chips/scrapes off quite easily. If I get it on my oak worktops and don't notice immediately, that's what I do, scraping with a plastic scraper or a butter knife, even a fingernail on ...


20

Kneading in a bowl is time-consuming and doesn't give as good a result as kneading on a flat surface, however I'll concentrate on cleaning. First, don't let things dry out, it's much easier to clean when things are moist, if you do let it dry out moisten it and let it soften before you try and clean it. Use cold water as hot water makes starches and ...


19

I see you're familiar with the "danger zone" concept. I think the only on-topic way to answer this is to help you add up the "danger zone" time, (and raise the concern of cross contamination!). I will say in response to your heading, there is no "loophole" in food safety guidelines. They are pretty stark in that things are ...


12

I feel your pain. Dough and sourdough starter seem to find ways of sneaking onto my worktop when I'm not looking, and drying there; as it's solid wood I can't soak them off, and do end up using my nails. A few things things spring to mind, depending on the task: Plastic ice scrapers for freezers work on fairly large flat surfaces. (That's what I should use, ...


11

This answer is not ideal, as it avoids the use of the pull-tab altogether: Use a regular can opener instead. No flinging of food involved!


9

To further @Tetsujin's answer. The Lysol product you have specified as Lysol Clean & Fresh Multi-Surface Cleaner is made of a number of active ingredients. The primary decontaminating component is Alkyl (50% C14, 40% C12, 10% C16) dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. This is a member of what are known as Quaternary Ammonium Compounds or Quaternary ...


9

What about 100 fingernails all scraping close to each other? That is one way I would describe the Scotch-Brite Dobie "all purpose cleaning pad". Here's a picture: Image source It's a plastic mesh around a foam sponge, and it's safe on all non-stick and other surfaces. It's a bit gentler than the plastic scrapers in some other answers, which means ...


8

As sugar dissolves extremely readily when damp, let alone wet, you could just manually pick out the clumps. If it's not clumped, it didn't get wet. Soap itself wouldn't travel any further than the water through the sugar, but the smell may. If the soap was perfumed, just getting the clumps out may not be sufficient. If you can still smell it afterwards, ...


8

Just rinse it off. It sounds simple, but unless it's a very porous surface, a quick rinse should work fine. I would say you're even fine to continue washing your things with a Mr. Clean. I'm sure it's toxic to take a bite out of the "eraser" but I doubt very little (if any) should be left over on hard surfaces like porcelain, and would not likely hurt you in ...


8

As you are asking about a single day, I'm pretty sure it's safe. Lets compare the concept with how we handle our typical leftovers; Say we made chilly, and stored it in a container in our fridge, so every time we decide make tacos, simply could scoop out some chilly. 2 days after we made the chilly, it came down to the last scoop. Would we hesitate to scrape ...


7

Chopsticks. Take a few pairs of the cheap wooden chopsticks you get with takeout Chinese food and hold them together in a bundle


7

The lid isn't flinging the food around. That happens because the can is moving. The simple solution is hold the can firmly in place on a table, worktop, etc, with one hand, while you pull on the ring with the other. If the can doesn't move, the contents won't go anywhere.


6

The jets can be unscrewed, using a properly sized wrench, and cleaned with an appropriately sized cleaner. Once clean they can screwed back in. They are typically made from brass and are soft. Using the wrong wrench can round off the hex head. More importantly the orifice in the jet can be unintentionally enlarged or damaged easily. Inserting anything from ...


6

Silicone does not dissolve in water. The scum you see floating on the top looks very much like lime-scale. This is in your water supply. It will also give you an encrusted kettle & white/grey blobs stuck to the nozzle of the hot tap after some time. You could try distilled water, or invest in some kind of hard water filtration system. As mentioned in ...


6

I keep an old credit/membership card next to the sink for this purpose.


6

I've used guitar picks for decades. They are in fact, artificial fingernails. Unfortunately, the music stores stopped giving them away free a few years ago. Now it's a couple, four bucks for a dozen Fender brand.


6

That quote sounds like they're assuming you fill the sink with water and leave dirty dishes sitting in the water. That seems gross. And of course you should wash your hands after doing the dishes, regardless of whether you washed your dishes immediately or let them soak first. I frequently leave dishes to soak and wash them later, but I don't fill the sink. ...


5

I accidentally left a aluminum sheet pan in the oven during the cleaning cycle. It certainly cleaned it up nice and new looking, however, it altered the molecular strength of the aluminum. It made it softer and easy to bend. I decided to throw it away because I was not sure that it was safe anymore to cook food on it.


5

Baking soda is a mild base (the opposite of being acidic). In the right concentration & environment, it can be a corrosive. What happened is that in addition to taking the burned bits off your pan, it also took the shiny finish coat off the outside of the pan. What you're seeing is the unpolished aluminium, with a coating of aluminum oxide. Since ...


5

You do not need to throw out the pan Metals tend to be impervious to absorption of much in the way of plastics (or anything else), which is part of the reason they make great cooking implements. If the plastic is on the cooking surface and that surface was seasoned, to be absolutely sure, I would recommend that you remove the seasoning and re-season. If ...


5

Like anything else food-related it's a matter of risk. If I'm picking raspberries straight off of my bush I often eat them without washing, but if I have a lot of them from the store I wash them as I don't know what they have been exposed to in packing and transit. Many people do not do this and get away with it just fine, occasionally someone gets sick. How ...


5

Microwave the bowl, or let it sit in a pot of boiling water, to loosen it so you can remove most of the gunk. Soaking in hot water for a while will remove the rest.


5

A chainmail pan scrubber is what I use on my cast iron, pots, and pans that needs something extra to help get them clean. Essentially it is reusable steel wool, but not as abrasive.


5

I keep a plastic jar-lid lying around for this task. Peanut-butter lids are good, but the lids of the jars of actual peanuts are the same material, and ~2.5" in diameter (compared to ~3.5"), which I like better. We go through peanuts fast enough that there's never much concern about the scraper wearing out. (These details may be different in your ...


5

What, if anything, was in the bucket before? I prefer to stick with food grade buckets, most easily found from foodservice operations that get food in buckets. For those, hot water and baking soda are key for removing the smell of the previous food if it was smelly, after washing with soap for basic cleaning. i.e. olive kegs are handy, but I can wash them by ...


5

If boiling, microwaving or washing sponges in the dishwasher or cloth washer does not disinfect them, steaming them will not, especially in a rice cooker vent where the steam quickly loses temperature. Throw them away and replace them regularly or, if feeling ecologically conscious, don't use sponges.


5

Steam from rice cookers also carries a certain amount of rice starch which would get deposited on the sponges in the situation you describe. Rice starch will provide an additional food source for bacteria, likely encouraging their growth.


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