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2

The question in the title is unanswerable. Your own search shows that there is no simple prescription of what you should do. The question "who is correct" is: both of them. The side you are interpreting as "you should microwave sponges" tells you that microwaving kills most of the bacteria. The side you are interpreting as "you ...


4

Steam from rice cookers also carries a certain amount of rice starch which would get deposited on the sponges in the situation you describe. Rice starch will provide an additional food source for bacteria, likely encouraging their growth.


5

If boiling, microwaving or washing sponges in the dishwasher or cloth washer does not disinfect them, steaming them will not, especially in a rice cooker vent where the steam quickly loses temperature. Throw them away and replace them regularly or, if feeling ecologically conscious, don't use sponges.


1

I'd add that it depends a lot on the food. On one end you have food that's inherently on the safe side, like sour milk products: They can safely stay at room temperature for a day or longer — being kept warm is how they are actually produced. The more acidic, sweet or salty a dish is, the safer. On the unsafe end would be proteins like raw egg (in mayo) or ...


1

The answer is exactly what you speculated - the spit. Well, not the spit itself, but the microbial contaminants from your oral cavity that you are introducing to the food when you eat. Your mouth (and rest of you too) contains a whole bunch of microorganisms (around 700 species in the mouth). Each time you put an eating implement in your mouth and return it ...


3

I don't think that this plan is necessarily unsafe, in terms of likelihood of sickening or killing you, but it's definitely less safe than washing the container. It only requires a microscopic amount of pathogens to make you extremely sick; that there is no visible residue is not as strong an argument as you seem to think. Rinsing is better with soap, too. ...


0

I'd say no. Conventional wisdom suggest that when in doubt, throw it. Throw it away, go back to your fishmonger/store and tell them about that. If that fails, do not buy from that brand (if there's any brands attached to your frozen fish)


8

As you are asking about a single day, I'm pretty sure it's safe. Lets compare the concept with how we handle our typical leftovers; Say we made chilly, and stored it in a container in our fridge, so every time we decide make tacos, simply could scoop out some chilly. 2 days after we made the chilly, it came down to the last scoop. Would we hesitate to scrape ...


19

I see you're familiar with the "danger zone" concept. I think the only on-topic way to answer this is to help you add up the "danger zone" time, (and raise the concern of cross contamination!). I will say in response to your heading, there is no "loophole" in food safety guidelines. They are pretty stark in that things are ...


1

I'm going to answer this based on my experience with my Staub, enamel over cast iron pans. The best way to get burnt on food off of enamel over cast iron is to do this: heat water in the pan/pot til really hot but not boiling, drop in Tbsp. fulls of baking soda into it, especially over the burnt on areas... wait 5 minutes, turn off heat and if it's really ...


1

If it is non-magnetic (304) it could be sensitized at about 1100 F (very dim red heat) which would reduce corrosion resistance to boiling brine. If it is magnetic (410), I can't imagine you could hurt it in the oven or surface burners. It could ruin bakelite handles. So there is no way you can damage any stainless in a home oven .


2

As correctly stated by Tetsujin, you shouldn't use laundry detergent. There are some tricks to increase the cleaning power of simple washing-up detergents. Soak the cloth for an hour or longer in hot water. The water should not be boiling, but just as hot as you can still touch. Many modern washing-up liquids contain enzymes that help "digest" ...


3

Accept that it will never look pristine white ever again. Whatever you do, don't wash it in Persil. That stuff is designed to make your clothes bright & nicely perfumed, not something you need in your turkey - "seven day freshness" isn't quite what they meant in the adverts. At least it doesn't have fabric conditioner in it, which would be even ...


0

Per Tupperware Customer Care - To remove stickiness: Ø Rub the surface with a baking soda and water paste on a damp cloth or sponge Ø Repeat if necessary. To prevent stickiness: Ø Each time you empty a Tupperware container, rinse it in cold water before its usual cleaning in warm suds. Ø Store containers without seals when not in use to allow fresh air to ...


4

The temperature of boiling water is 100° Celsius or 212° Fahrenheit. This is considerably colder than the self-cleaning cycle in your oven. It would be perfectly sufficient to set the oven temperature to about 120°C/240°F to heat the tray. It would not take long to reach the desired temperature for the tray at those lower temperatures since metals conduct ...


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