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55

I suspect it means "ditto (the above line)": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ditto_mark seems to indicate that "do." was an old way of abbreviating before the ditto mark (") became widespread.


46

Cinnamon is the bark of a tree. It is either sold as rolled strips of bark (=cinnamon sticks) or ground. It will not dissolve, neither in water nor in alcohol. What you want to do is basically the same as was done commercially with the vanilla extract you are already using: Extract the taste, then discard the bark itself. Alcohol is a good choice for ...


20

Most cocktails use sugar syrup (e.g. simple syrup with a water to sugar ratio of 1:1 or 1:2) instead of granulated sugar. This eliminates the need to dissolve the grains in - typically cold - liquids. When you consider powdered (confectioner's) sugar because of the smaller grain size, remember that they will most likely contain anti-caking agents like ...


19

Wikipedia has a whole article dedicated to this question! Various possible reasons for Bond's preference are given; the last paragraph in this quote seems like the most solid explanation: "Shaken, not stirred" is a catchphrase of Ian Fleming's fictional British Secret Service agent James Bond, and his preference for how he wished his martini prepared. ...


19

Cointreau is just one particular brand. You can substitute any other triple sec/orange liquor. Some may suit your tastes better than others, but there's really no reason to insist on the fanciest most well-known brands, especially since you're mixing it into cocktails. So sure, try the Meaghers, or anything else that looks promising. And when in doubt, just ...


16

You could, of course, create gel layers, and the determining factor in stability would be the firmness of those gels. However - and I suppose this is just a hunch - I seriously doubt that a gel firm enough to hold the weight of all the heavier layers above it (and you are asking for at least 3) would really be drinkable, unless you're aiming for the ...


15

Foam in shaken cocktails is often actually considered a desirable quality. This is the reason why you'll sometimes see egg white included in recipes like the whiskey sour - the proteins in the egg white help to maintain a long-lasting froth on top of the cocktail, which many drinkers find appealing. It adds a slightly different mouthfeel too and can make a ...


15

Despite what many bars, convenience stores, and fast food restaurants would have you believe, drink glasses are not intended to be "filled to the brim" (or even close). This is particularly true of cocktails and other spirits. The 'head space' allows the drinker to swirl (or, if they have had a few, 'slosh') the drink around to remix the cocktail ingredients ...


14

I don't think it will ever dissolve in an edible solution. However it will readily infuse to both water and alcohol. So instead of trying to retain the cinnamon itself in the solution, just infuse it. Once the flavor has made it's way into the alcohol or water then sieve through a fine mesh. You'd be better off doing this with cinnamon sticks as they are ...


14

You should use 'superfine' sugar, which is broken down much smaller so that it'll dissolve better in cold liquids. You can make your own by putting some sugar into a food processor and whizzing it around for a bit. You can also make a simple or heavy syrup, so you don't have to worry about sugar dissolving. Heavy syrup will keep longer in the fridge, as ...


13

Here's a report on an informally conducted taste test suggesting that there are indeed detectable differences between various vodkas: (the report does not say so, but I suspect that much like wine, whether one vodka comes out as better as another one has little to do with its price, except at the very bottom end of the price range) And, yes, there are ...


12

More likely is that he used the syrup that maraschino "cherries" are stored in. It's sometimes used by those who don't know better in things like Shirley Temples. It is bright, bright red, very sweet, very strongly flavored of cherries (or more properly a sort of sickly, artificial interpretation of the flavor). I hope it's obvious that I'm not a fan of ...


11

According to some, aerating the gin by splashing it around alters the flavor, or "bruises" it; or more perceptibly, one would be likely to quickly notice the little bubbles disrupt its normal tongue/palate texture. From Wikipedia, "Shaken, not stirred": Some connoisseurs believe that shaking gin is a faux pas, supposedly because the shaking "bruises" ...


11

Some preparations for Irish coffee demand that the whiskey and sugar be caramelized together by heating them in a heat-proof glass over a burner and then topped with hot coffee and thick liquid cream. It takes some experience to get this heating step right. (Youtube video here) Baileys coffee is simply coffee with added Baileys liquour (cream optional), ...


10

It looks a champagne coupe, like this. Did you ever see pyramids of glasses where a butler fills the top one and let the champagne flow? I think that's the type of glass used, like this.


10

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


9

The classic mistake when making a Mojito or a Julep is to over muddle the mint. Pounding away at the mint will release so much flavour from it, that you won't taste any of the other ingredients. A perfect Mojito should comprise a balance of flavours. The other main constituents do not have a particularly strong flavour, so its very easy to swamp them with ...


9

As far as I know: No, there isn't. Because is some cases that is the purpose of crushed ice: Melting faster than an ice cube. I don't know how many guest you have, but I would just keep ice cubes in the freezer. When making a drink, just take some out, hold it in your hand and hit it hard with the back of your bar spoon. Voila, crushed ice. Please note ...


9

Olives (and onions) are a very traditional garnish used by bartenders to add a slightly savory flavor to a drink. As with many things behind the bar, they're used nowadays largely because they're iconic, but they do have a subtle effect on flavor. It's not really known where traditional garnishes such as citrus peels, cherries, olives/onions, and mint ...


8

If the restaurant or bar is using a margarita mix, they frequently contain additional syrups and stabilizing gums or starches which add body to the drinks. It could also be that the high powered blenders frequently used in bars will be better at creating a smoother and thicker texture, or a more 'emulsified' slush. If you want to try making it thicker at ...


8

I actually dealt with a very similar problem when I decided it would be nice to have coffee with a cinnamon taste - and of course it is! But I didn't want to buy a flavor syrup, and I had a ton of ground cinnamon available. I eventually settled on adding even just a little bit (less than a teaspoon) of ground cinnamon to the bottom of a coffee filter before ...


8

Most of the cooling from ice comes from the melting anyway. That's why ice makers, which don't freeze as cold as freezers, are still useful. It takes 334J/g to turn ice at 0C into water at 0C, but only 2.03J/g to warm ice by 1C. So to halve the amount of ice you use to get the same cooling you'd need to freeze it to around -150C. If you're going to do that ...


7

There is no chemical reaction that happens. It is mainly a garnish. You might get a tiny bit of celery flavor in the drink from the celery, but I think this is negligible given the other strong flavors in a bloody mary. If you want a celery flavor, add celery salt.


7

Angostura Bitters is a specific brand of bitters. The Angostura in the name refers to the town where it was originally produced.


7

There can easily be some confusion regarding the terms cream of coconut, coconut milk, coconut cream, coconut water etc. It is normal and even often desirable for coconut milk to separate, and for the fattier part (the cream) to clump. Since that is generally not a great quality for mixed drinks, read on. For Pina Coladas, the most commonly used product is ...


7

I am not sure if "glass" in your recipe is the same as this, but in David Wondrich's book, "IMBIBE!" (about vintage cocktail recipes), he indicates that a "wineglass" measurement in vintage recipes was equal to 2 ounces.


6

It's meant to be munched on between sips, and permits a "reset" - the cocktail will be fresh upon the tongue the sip after the bite, permitting you to enjoy its flavor and consistency without being oppressed by the cumulative effect of unctuous, spice and salt that is the hallmark of the beverage. Celery is an astringent and an aromatic - it will cut ...


6

"Don"t bruise the Gin" is a very old request. It is NOT caused by shaking but by stirring the Gin. Prior to stainless steel, bar spoons were made from iron, steel or silver. Both iron and steel spoons will rust if not cleaned and dried properly. If the bartender stirred your Gin with a spoon that had rust on it it would change the color and taste of the Gin ...


6

This is one of those things that everybody has an answer for, but nobody has any evidence. Almost nobody. The website Proof66 decided they were uniquely qualified to provide some actual... evidence. They did a controlled, blind-tasted experiment with 4 different ways of beating up the Gin. Check it out. The bottom line on the question "Can you bruise a ...


6

The clumps come from too much liquid on the glass when applying the sugar. The way I learned to salt a glass was to dip the glass upside-down in a shallow plate or bowl of water, let it drip for 5-10 seconds, then dip it into an evenly layered plate of salt. I think this should work for sugaring a glass.


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