Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

Hot answers tagged

56

It was timing. If you want to make chocolate meringues, add the cocoa powder to the liquid egg whites, and then whisk it all together at once. Beaten egg whites are bubbles. Don't add things to an already-formed meringue, as they will just cause the bubble structure to collapse. Ever sprinkled sugar or cinnamon powder on a cappuccino? Notice how the ...


18

Cocoa powder is sometimes added to regular chili because the bitter earthiness compliments the dark chilies. White chicken chili only contains green chilies and has no complex flavor to compliment. White chocolate might make your chili creamier but there are cheaper ingredients that do that better.


15

White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder. You will just add cocoa butter (fat) and sugar. I believe it will be useless in your chicken chili.


9

Cocoa powder is made by baking the cocoa beans and then removing all the fat from them, then milling the rest to a powder. In fact, semisweet chocolate is a solid sol (a colloid formed from homogenically dispersing solid particles (cocoa dry matter) in a solid (cocoa fat)). What you should add is not water, but fat. Before you start, you must be aware that ...


9

No, it is not a good idea at all. It will be worse, not better. What you are missing here is that cocoa powder does not dissolve at all, never, it just disperses in water (or milk). So there is no reason why methods for dissolving stuff would work with cocoa powder. You will need to use a method created for colloid-producing powders like cocoa powder, which ...


9

I wouldn't. The purpose of the chocolate in a regular chili is the bitterness and flavor that come from the cocoa solids. (I use cocoa powder in my own chili - never so much that the chocolate flavor is discernable, and never a sweetened chocolate. I'll use 100% unsweetened chocolate if I have it on hand.) White chocolate - even the real stuff with cocoa ...


8

They are technically different... but it seems that the producers do not always follow the correct terminology in an attempt to sound fancy. Instant Cocoa is made with cocoa powder, as you stated in your question. It's made from leftovers from the chocolate making process and contains little cocoa butter. Hot beverages made with it are called "Hot Cocoa". ...


8

Yep, cocoa and cacao are the same thing. The 72% has sugar making up the rest of the mass. The description on amazon actually mentions that it's 27% sugar and 43.5% cocoa butter. The rest is cocoa solids, the chocolate-y stuff. As you say, that particular brand is pretty expensive; it's also pretty popular and well-regarded. Since it has plenty of sugar in ...


8

Cocoa butter has an exceptionally high melting point for a vegan lipid. For most baking applications, it probably not ideal; you would be better served with a liquid oil, or if you need something solid but malleable, a hydrogenated vegetable oil product like a vegan margarine. The main culinary use (in general) is thinning chocolate in creating chocolate ...


8

Any time you see something like "may contain" after an ingredient list, it's a warning that it might contain trace amounts of that substance and so could be harmful to anyone who's allergic to it. Basically what they're saying is that they didn't intentionally add any milk or milk products to the cocoa butter, but since they make other products at the same ...


7

According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


7

The fleshy party of the fruit of theobroma cacao is is supposed to be sweet and pleasant. However, it does not taste like chocolate. Chocolate is made from the nibs or seeds within the fruit of theobroma cacao, after it is fermented ground, and processed, and is in no way sweet. The nibs themselves are very low in sugar, and contain alkaloids (such as ...


7

As for the difference in labelling, there is no difference, as Jefromi already said. I could imagine some producers calling more-or-less raw liquor "cacao" and the processed product "cocoa mass", but this is not standard usage. While there is no difference between the words, the product may still be very different. The problem is that cocoa mass with the ...


7

You definitely want to use cocoa powder if you can...but... I've done it in a pinch. It's not as good as cocoa powder though because hot chocolate mix is usually also sugar & sometimes powdered milk. But it's still something to fix a chocolate craving when you don't have much else in the cupboard. I've added hot chocolate mix to waffle mix/pancake mix ...


6

Yes, it is perfectly safe uncooked, although it may be unpalatable without being sweetened. For example, you can make your own chocolate milk mix with cocoa powder and powdered sugar. Simply mix it into milk, without cooking, and enjoy. It is also dusted uncooked as a garnish or accent on some pastries or cakes.


6

The problem here is partially timing but mostly the second whipping; it's better to fold-in dry ingredients rather than whip into an already formed meringue. The cocoa added to the whipped egg white doesn't help stabilize it, so whipping it again once it's added will cause the bubble-structure to collapse rapidly. Delicately folding-in the cocoa until it ...


6

For richness, I wouldn't go to cocoa, but probably nutmeg. Allspice or cardamon might also work, depending on the flavors.


5

Cacao is actually the name of the tree. The beans in the Cacao pods are fermented and processed to make chocolate. Pure chocolate has two main components: cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Cocoa mass listed on labels contains both cocoa butter and cocoa solids. Some manufacturers list the percentage as cocoa or cacao (as refered to in some non-english ...


5

I'm not familiar with that brand, but cocoa powder can be processed differently. The major categories are "natural" and "dutch processed", the latter being less acidic and having a somewhat milder flavor. And of course various brands may vary.


5

You certainly could brew a drink from pure cocoa powder. It'll be pretty bitter, though; if you don't like unsweetened chocolate you might not like it much, though. So you'll most likely end up adding dairy and sugar, and ending up with hot cocoa. It won't ever be exactly the same process though. In both cases there's a lot of processing of the beans, and ...


4

Store cocoa powder in a dark, cool, dry place, sealed against vermin. Dark and cool both slow the process by which volatiles (i.e., flavor) degrade. That said, don't keep it in the fridge or freezer unless sealed airtight, because both types of chill-chests are relatively humid environments. Humidity promotes mold, even on cocoa. By the way, for future ...


4

I have been in the same situation as you and I used hot chocolate mix and it worked just fine. But if you want a stronger taste, use cocoa powder. When I used hot chocolate mix, my cake was a bit bland and not very chocolatey - although it might have just been the hot chocolate mix I was using.


4

Koko Samoa is a chocolate drink popular in the Pacific. It seems to involve just simmering ground cocoa beans in water and later adding sugar. Most of the online information is people trying to sell it to you - in Samoa people just buy it at roadside stands or make it for themselves. I did manage to find one article that might be interesting for you. If I ...


4

Without actually being able to access the ConsumerLab report you mentioned, it's difficult to know what meets your definition of safe. Scharffen Berger natural cocoa is one option. It has 1g fat per 5g serving, which I believe should meet your definition of "full fat". It is natural (non-alkalized) cocoa powder. It's quite expensive, and I believe normally ...


4

The cocoa plants/grains were grown in different areas, the soil they grow in will have different mineral content; the heat and humidity will be different, the plant will grow in different ways resulting in cocoa pods and grains will be different. They will have different flavors, sometime it is subtle, sometimes it is obvious. This is what people, in ...


3

I have used hot chocolate mix instead of cocoa powder... As state earlier it is usually a blend of cocoa, sugar and milk powder... so, you need to adjust the sugar levels. However, also be aware that some of the new style hot chocolate mixes that want to emulate the milky froth of a hot chocolate made with an espresso machine also contain a frothing agent... ...


3

I have a different observation from Catija. I've seen tons of "Hot chocolate" drinks which are indeed just mixtures of precooked cocoa powder, sugar and starch. You have to read the ingredients to know what you have in front of you. Maybe there are jurisdictions where the name is preserved for real chocolate, but if this is not the case here in the EU, ...


3

Looking at your recipe, the most obvious thing to me is that there is no salt. Adding a small quantity of salt (say, 1/2 tsp) will enhance the flavors of the ingredients already present. The second thing you might try is switching to dutch processed cocoa; many people find this has a more intense chocolaty taste. You could try enhancing the overall flavor ...


3

The recipe you've found looks like "crazy cake" or "wacky cake" (or "depression cake"), which is a fairly common egg-free cake. I've made it a number of times for a friend with an egg allergy and it's a very good vegan cake. To make a vanilla version, leave out the cocoa powder and increase the vanilla extract slightly (1.5 teaspoons). There are a wide ...


3

Dutch processed cocoa is "washed" with a potassium carbonate solution to neutralize the acidity to a pH of 7. While it does give cocoa a richer hue, the color can range quite a bit from a light reddish brown to a dark brown. Color is less an indicator than the label on the product. The process is used to provide a more mellow flavor.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible