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20

Thai curry recipes often use a lot, and the flavour is distinctive. You'll need to experiment. Your idea of cashews is a good place to start. What I've often used in Indian curries is ground almonds (almond flour would be better but I can't get it easily). They have some thickening power and quite a suitable taste. You could also try cooking with nut milk - ...


17

The separation you are getting is caused by inadequate mixing of coconut solids and curry paste. This will happen if you add coconut cream at the wrong time (or the wrong way) and you then cook it incorrectly. David Thompson is a world renowned chef and an expert on Thai cuisine. Here's my adaption of Thompson's technique: Place 5 or so tablespoons of ...


14

Rule of thumb, dairy in the north and coconut in southern recipes. ie korma wouldn't have coconut Indian yogurt is made with whole milk. As with western recipes, balancing the fat for good mouth-feel is important: yogurt can be a good choice when a larger quantity of liquid is called for. Cream works great when a finishing splash smooths out flavors without ...


11

Butter is about 80% milkfat, and 20% water, more or less. 3/4 stick is 6 tablespoons. You should be able to substitute six tablespoons of coconut oil one to one. It should be well within the tolerance of the recipe. If you really want to account for the water, you would do about 5 tbl of coconut oil, and 1 tbl of liquid.


10

In North Indian cuisine, oftentimes, cashew or almond paste is used in place of coconuts for lack of availability of the latter. You could soak up some cashew (depending on how thick you want the curry to be) in a bowl of warm water until they get a little softer. Use a food processor to grind it into a fine paste. The other substitute could be tomato ...


10

Butter is 83% fat, 17% water (we can ignore the milk solids in this case). Instead of 90 g butter, you can use 75 g coconut oil and 15 g more liquid (e.g. milk, or whatever the recipe specifies). There will be a slight difference in texture in the finished product, but nothing to worry about.


10

A reasonably light cream (about 15% fat) should be fine as a substitute. It will lack the specific coconut flavour, obviously, but that's fine in this case. What's more important is the fat as a flavour carrier, and the creaminess in the texture. A soy based cream, or even oat milk should work equally well here, too. On the other hand, rice milk would ...


10

Substitutes have been mentioned already, but how about going the other way? There are more curries without coconut than there are with it. Many many curries use an onion base for thickness; coconut is a Southern Indian/Sri Lankan twist on what is a continent-full of cuisine. Look down the even just the standard sauces of any take-away menu... Bhuna Madras ...


9

Alton Brown made coconut milk on his show Good Eats a few years ago, and he suggested using a clean tea towel and squeezing the pulp until it has given up all the liquid. Here is more on it: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/coconut-milk-and-cream-recipe/index.html


8

Empty the water from inside the coconut, as this is not the milk you want. Crack open your coconut and scrape out the meat. In a blender, take about half your meat and roughly 1 1/2 cups of hot water (more or less depending on your desired thickness), and process. Repeat step 3 with the other half of the meat. Place a few layers of cheesecloth over a bowl ...


8

Coconut oil is a saturated fat, which makes it solid at room temperature. Above room temperature, it behaves exactly like any other oil and has a very high smoke point. You don't need to treat it in any special way. I personally just use a knife or spoon to dig a little bit out of the container. Coconut oil is considered to have a neutral flavour (with the ...


8

Coconut cream is a more concentrated version of coconut milk, with more fat but also more coconut solids. Coconut milk won't mix well with additional coconut oil, because without the additional solids the emulsion will be unstable. If you'd like to make your own coconut cream from scratch, you'll need a coconut. Alternatively, buy it directly, or skim it ...


7

Try adding fresh milk or skimmed milk as substitute... It really works. I personally tried many other ingredients to replace the coconut milk while making Malaysian curry... Milk works the best for me.


7

I'm disappointed to see the answers to your query. They're way off the mark. OK - firstly, you want to get the oil to separate when cooking the coconut cream in Thai cooking. Without that, you end up with a smooth, creamy sauce which just isn't the authentic way to do it at all. That's the standard beginner's mistake. You can use the heavy cream (the harder ...


7

There can easily be some confusion regarding the terms cream of coconut, coconut milk, coconut cream, coconut water etc. It is normal and even often desirable for coconut milk to separate, and for the fattier part (the cream) to clump. Since that is generally not a great quality for mixed drinks, read on. For Pina Coladas, the most commonly used product is ...


7

Yes, I think you can. The page you link does list the oil as "food grade", and specifies no added solvents... so there's probably nothing dangerous in the jar and it can be safely used for cooking. In general, though, you usually shouldn't equate cosmetic treatments and edible substances, even if some of the ingredients are the same (soaps often do this, ...


7

There are multiple qualities, differently refined, on the market. Highly refined qualities that leave only the oil (various fatty acids) itself will have a very high smoke point and be suitable for high heat frying. There is a lot of saturated fats in coconut oil, which result in both the solid texture at low temperatures and the stability at high heat. ...


7

This is a common problem with coconut milk in cooler drinks, most commonly coffee. Coconut milk is approximately 25% fats (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coconut_milk) which will coagulate in cooler temperatures or exposed to ice. You're essentially cooling the coconut milk fats with ice past their solidification state which is causing the lumps. ...


7

I don't know much about Thai curries but there are plenty of Indian curries that are broadly similar to coconut-based ones but with sauces made with cashews and other nuts. Typically, you'd want to soak the nuts for a few hours and then blitz them into a puree, or just use a nut butter because life's too short. Indeed, there are many Indian curries that don'...


6

I was making a Thai green curry dish and I too found myself without any coconut milk, and didn't have any of the products recommended in this thread (no heavy cream, almonds, cashew, etc.). I ended up using 2% milk + 1 Tsp of butter, as that was all I had, while it obviously lacked the coconut flavor, it was quite good though the overall dish was spicier ...


6

Shake it gently and listen for and feel the slosh. As coconuts age the liquid level decline to zero An unripe coconut is nearly full and can hardly slosh. A good slosh sound is a generally ripe coconut (about 150 to 300 ml's of liquid). As the liquid get less and less the flesh get softer and tastier to eat raw There are many different types of coconuts, ...


6

Ok I'm going to give this a shot by helping you understand why the ingredients are in there. At it's core this seems to be a very aerated meringue with stabilizers to help avoid using dairy products and eggs. organic sweet potato, organic apple puree concentrate, organic sweet pea, organic white grape juice concentrate These ingredients are your base ...


6

Use coconut milk powder. It is very fine and dissolves easy and tastes great, better than artificial essence. Also it is pure white and does not alter the texture or color. I found it in an Indian store, what a find. I also use it in coconut custard pies dissolved in regular milk instead of the canned coconut milk, and to change basic cake recipes into ...


6

Canned coconut milk is the base of the majority of savory coconut sauces, Thai or otherwise. It tastes of coconut, but it isn't strongly flavored. If your coconut milk separates (some do, some don't; added emulsifiers inhibit this separation) the thicker layer that rises to the top is coconut cream. Basically coconut cream is coconut milk with less water and ...


6

All coconut milk separates out. When you buy it tinned, there is often a plug of coconut cream above a pocket of coconut milk. But it certainly should recombine. It may well have been too cold when you tried to stir it together - let it come to room temperature at least. If you warmed it up on the stove you'd find the two would melt together without any ...


6

When I visited Malaysia and Singapore, the nasi lemak I tried had very little taste of coconut - many of the people I traveled with even got surprised when they heard the rice was cooked in coconut. The name literally means 'fatty rice', which indicates that the coconut milk is added only to make the rice fatty, i.e. more sticky. When I made it myself, the ...


6

There is nothing wrong with your coconut milk. I've found that coconut milks and creams vary from brand to brand. Your milk has a good portion of coconut oil in it. Coconut oil is solid at room temperature. You have a few options: Remove the fat This would solve your texture issues but would be a shame. The fat is delicious. Emulsify the fat Like making ...


6

Coconut milk is made of different components, like water, fat, minerals and protein. All those components have a different mass and when let sit in the fridge for some time, the components with higher mass (protein) tend to sink to the bottom as they are pulled by gravity and the components with lower mass float to the top (water, fat). The same happens ...


5

To make coconut milk, I either use frozen shredded coconut or whole coconut from Indian stores. Take a cup of shredded coconut and add 1/2 cup of lukewarm water (lukewarm water brings out the maximum milk and beautiful white color). Blend it nicely for a minute or two until all the flakes are ground thoroughly. Strain the ground mixture using a thin kitchen ...


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