13

Its interesting to see all of the responses. At Kohana Coffee we make cold brew coffee concentrate commercially. Our caffeine numbers come to about 80 mg of caffeine per oz of cold brew concentrate. Our mix ratio for use is 1 part concentrate to 2 parts milk or water. Typically, a 16oz cup of iced coffee would be 3 oz concentrate, 6 oz milk/water plus ice to ...


10

I work at Peter Larsen Kaffe in Denmark, where I make cold brew. I used 1 kg of coffee and 10 liter water, letting it stand for 17 hours. Then I sent it to Steiner Laboratory, where they measured the content of caffeine to be 920 mg per liter of the cold brew.


5

You left water and an organic substance (coffee) at an undefined temperature (but apparently not frozen) for a long time. There was no step to eliminate any bacterial or fungal load before sealing the bottle or at the time of bottling and no chemical preserving agent that may have done that in lieu of heating or prevented their growth during storage. ...


4

I've been using a Toddy for about two years now. I have found that you can get a plenty strong concentrate with only 1/2 pound of freshly ground coffee steeped in filtered water (like in a Brita) for just short of 18 hours. Beyond 18 hours the grounds become waterlogged and the same elements that produce the bitterness found in hot brewed coffee start to ...


3

Caffeine is much more soluble in hot water, true. But 100mL of room temperature water will still dissolve 2000mg of caffeine, so carrying capacity of water isn't a limiting factor. The better determinant of caffeine content of brewed coffee isn't temperature at all! It's... the caffeine content of the roasted beans. Roasting decomposes caffeine, so lighter ...


2

If the question is which brew method results in a higher per oz caffeine content, the answer is that cold brew coffee brewed at a 1:5 coffee to water has significantly more caffeine per ounce than hot brew brewed at a 1:17 ratio. http://www.caffeineinformer.com/the-caffeine-database If the question is whether cold or hot brew extracts more caffeine per oz ...


1

I make cold brew regularly using an ISI whipper, and simply filter through one paper filter in a Chemex set up. So, I am sure you are just fine. The wool filter appears to be the main filter in this system, with the paper filter in place simply to extend its life (see the FAQ on the website). You probably want to go back to the wool filter, since this is ...


1

Not research, but here's my personal experience. I cold brew my coffee with just normal mason jars (not Toddy), the general suggested steep time is 12 hours. You can increase it to up to 24 hours depending on the strength you like your cup of coffee. 1 or 2 hours would be too short to extract the full body of flavors in my opinion if you were using the ...


1

Cold extracted, or filtered, or press coffee contains significantly less caffeine and significant less oils that hot brewed coffee. Now if you choose home methods, by using your French press for instance, then this will be less the case. The caffeine percentage is because of the sponge filter. As cold water is the major method of decaffeinating coffee, it ...


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