113

Probably not. Carrots naturally (or due to selective breeding) come in an extremely wide variety of colors from white to yellow to orange to red/pink to purple. It's likely that you were simply looking at two different varieties, one of which was more pale than the other. click image for source Even the color being only "skin deep" isn't necessarily a ...


24

It's probably not anything so sinister. Even typical orange carrots do vary somewhat in hue. And as with many other vegetables, "heirloom" varieties of carrot have started to make a bit of a comeback in the US. As you can see here there's a wide variation in color among these heirloom versions; they can range from very pale, almost white to brilliant orange ...


16

Hojicha is a green tea which is made from bancha, a low grade green tea, and cooked slightly; this very inexpensive green tea often comes out brown because it is discolored by oxidation. Other than this variety, and some very stale bancha, I can't think of a Japanese green tea that comes out brown. Some stale kukicha might come out brown, and low quality ...


15

This is an excerpt: Regulatory compliance. Inks used for egg coding must comply with government regulations governing food marking inks. These broadly state that inks printed on food items must be safe for human consumption, both when the food item is raw and when it is cooked. Egg coding must not weaken the egg shell or penetrate through the ...


11

If you make homemade strawberry ice cream, the color is likely to be very, very pale, approaching white. Green food coloring in your mix should do the trick. It would be very difficult to retroactively turn commercial ice cream a different color. The pink is almost certainly from food coloring, and mixing in another coloring would be very difficult ...


11

The other answers did not mention the packaging. Carrots that come in bags (like baby carrots) often have an orange grid pattern painted on the bag. This makes the carrots look significantly more orange than their non-bagged counterparts.


10

Squid ink is used to make black pasta, no reason it wouldn't work with butter. Good fishmongers should be able to source it for you.


9

As a note I'm answering this question based on avoiding artificial food dyes (Red #40, Yellow #5, etc) rather than all food coloring. Raspberry puree will produce a pink result, and I have sucessfully done a very dark pink with ground freeze dried raspberries. Achieving the depth of color needed to provide a true red or blue would require not only several ...


8

In a literal sense, rumtscho and SAJ14SAJ are right. However, if you're willing to be a little adventurous, then you can do this! and without an ice cream machine. And it'll be a fun party trick, to boot. First, buy strawberry ice cream with real strawberries that isn't fully pink (like Haagen Dazs). Second, use pistachio colouring/paste, it's full ...


7

Carrots come in lots of colors from pure white, yellow, orange up to and even including deep purple. They are not dyed.


6

It's the kind of tea you are using. Japanese green teas are mostly steamed, where Chinese teas are roasted, in order to stop the leaves from breaking down. When the leaves are steamed, as in Sencha or Matcha, they produce a very green leaf, and in turn, a green brew. If a restaurant serves you a really green colored tea, its most likely a powdered sencha (...


5

You are not stating whether you are making the pasta yourself or if you are using premade pasta. I am going to assume it is the former. For red pasta, I would recommend substituting some of the liquids with beetroot juice. You will need to experiment with it to get the color right. I would also recommend trying it in pasta both with and without egg, as the ...


5

If you just want to change the color - just some black food coloring should be fine. If you can't find it in a store locally, you can always see if a bakery that does cakes will give you just a tiny bit or if they'll blend a few colors to make a dark gray.


4

No, this is not possible for several reasons. First, you cannot color already-made ice-cream. It is made from frozen crystals of cream, and it is too hard frozen to be mixed with stuff. If you were to drizzle food coloring on it, you'd only get a few dots, but they will not spread through the whole thing. Colored ice cream is made by dissolving food ...


4

The simple answer is: No. First of all the recipe says 1 tablespoon of blue food coloring. This is pretty typical for a velvet cake. In fact it's actually less than I would expect. This is because the original color is dark brown from the cocoa powder. To cover that up and turn it into a different color requires a lot of food coloring. If you take a look ...


4

It will be very difficult to match the range of intense colors that food coloring can provide with only fruits and vegetables as coloring sources. Blue will probably be impossible. Pink to reddish-purple may be achievable. Beet juice would be red-to-purple, and probably intense enough to color moderately without adding too strong a flavor. For a more ...


4

From my experience coloring regular sugar with ordinary food coloring, drying it, and then crushing it in a mortar yields good results. Be careful to not use too much food coloring though, or it will never dry properly! I haven't tried to see if cornstarch might save it, but as long as you do the drying properly and don't overdo the amount of color it ...


3

I tried boiling the noodles with colored water and it didn't change the color at all. I made a corn starch slurry with cold water (approx 1/2 cup) and McCormick's Colors from Nature (red 2 tsp), which is just concentrated beet coloring. I mixed it into the drained, but hot pasta and came out with a nice pink color. I finished it with extra virgin olive ...


3

If you use the same Dr. Oetker colouring that I have used in the past, which is advertised as a 'gel' colouring, then you have to use a lot to get a good intense colour. You may have better results (colour and taste-wise) getting proper concentrated gel food colourings, like those made by Wilton. You need to use much less than cheaper brands so you don't ...


3

Natural food coloring kits, consisting of powdered concentrates, are available at health food stores in some regions, eg http://shop.biovegan.de/biovegan-farbspass-farbende-lebensmittel-5x8g is common here... and in this case, there is no cochineal in there, since insects/arachnids do not widely qualify as vegan, and this brand (as the name says :) ...


2

If you want to start with bought ice cream there isn't really a way to re-color it, but you could coat it in some thing else. One idea might be dyed white chocolate (just melted and with a small mount of food coloring added). Maybe create small balls of strawberry ice-cream with a watermelon scoop, put on a stick or a tooth pick and dip in the green melted ...


2

All green tea should be green, but if you let it boil for too long it will be brown. Try waiting half a minute rather than 90 seconds, and it will be a spring green. It depends on how strong typical cafes make it, though my green tea also turns brown after too long.


2

I did SEVEN different experiments to create a pink cake for my daughter. Beet juice will lose it's color when baked. Fruit purees will keep their color, but they aren't great for the texture of the cake. Freeze dried fruits, ground in to a powder, will color the cake, but it will be faint. Hopefully this will save anyone who reads this a few wasted ...


2

School art and craft supply outlets sell colourings safe for children's consumption in liquid and powder forms Powder based colour works fine in many bakery products


2

I've tried dying pasta by just adding food dye to the boiling water, but you don't get very deep colors. I then tried letting it sit in the (cooled) water for a while, but it really didn't get that deep. (I didn't care about the texture as much; I needed something to use as intestines for halloween a few years back) If you have the time, it might be ...


2

You could add chopped fresh herbs to the dough. I'm not familiar with Jiaozi to know how much it would affect the texture, but its common in pasta dough. If you chop it fine enough, it should bleed quite a bit of green color into the dough. I don't know any particularly traditional food coloring methods, but I do know that tea is often used in place of ...


2

I baked 3 or 4 loaves of challah last January over a month period to try and perfect a rainbow loaf of bread for a dinner party (Wizard of Oz and over the rainbow themed). Loaf 1 I mixed ingrediants and worked the dough and then prior to kneading I used cake decorating gelled (Wilton brand) coloring. This required substantial kneading to fully integrate ...


2

Originally, red chocolate cake did not have artificial coloring. The red (not nearly as red as we're used to now) came from natural (not Dutch processed) cocoa (acidic), plus another acidic ingredient (buttermilk or vinegar). The double-dose of acid reacts with the anthocyanins (antioxidants that are red, even more so in the presence of acid) in the cocoa ...


2

Thanks rumtscho. I wasn't sure if I should post as an answer or an edit. I've edited to remove answer and place here. Update: I ended up making two brownies. One 8X8 pan with 6 bags of mint tea stirred into it. It gave off a very earthy (and minty) smell and has a very earthy/herby taste (and minty too). I doubt I'll make the mint ones again. The ...


2

I think i can help you here if anyone is interested. It's an easy process that costs almost nothing. No grinders are required. The issue with using liquid colours is they cause the icing sugar to clump, hence the need to dry the sugar and then grind it. Using powdered colours still require a liquid to be added so you're back at step one. Grinding whilst ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible