7

There's not really a European equivalent for the FDA's definition of extract (by ethanol percentage). Instead, the EU specifies what constitutes natural vs 'vanilla flavouring' (euphemism for 'artificial'). See the EU's white paper on it here (notably page 15): AUTHENTICITY OF VANILLA AND VANILLA EXTRACTS Also, in plainer speak, info on vanilla industry ...


5

For a clear direct response for your question: yes, there is a correlation between sugar concentration and spoil rate. The correlation is actually between any kind of solute and spoil rate, so that's the reason for using salt and sugar as agents for preserving foods. The technical name is "water availability" and the maths behind that is "free water ...


4

This worked for me as an experiment in freeze concentration (of plums) and freeze distillation (of a lemon juice/vodka mix). It is not fast. Remove the pith, stem, seeds, and the rest from the fruit you want to use. If you want to extract with alcohol, add full-strength vodka now, at about 50/50 ratio with the fruit. Blend it Freeze in a strong plastic bag,...


4

Yes, you can do it yourself: People have done this to concentrate alcohol, and other water contaminants, at least as far back as the middle ages. Example: Fractional freezing -- "jacking" in old parlance -- has a long history in the United States. The beverage applejack was produced using this method by first fermenting apple juice into hard apple cider. ...


3

You can choose. Just taste it. Too strong, more water, too weak, boil down. It is better to leave the lid on while boiling. That will make the broth cloudy, but more tasty.You can always filter it and clear it up with egg white. For easy storage: boil it down, really down,and freeze. i dont think more than a litre of a kilo of bones will be very strong


3

Given that you don't know what you have, I'd favor making up "more of less 100% chili sauce" or as close to that as your methods come, taking care, and not tasting it. Then take one tiny amount of that (a drop, a 1/4 teaspoon, a mL) and dilute it in whatever seems likely in your estimation (I suppose based on "possibly 1 million Scovilles" and some ...


2

We prepare and cook a lot of African dishes-using bird chiles. When in doubt as to the exact heat to infuse, we use the following method: Pierce one chili and add it into the stew or other dish Stir it around a few times and wait 10 minutes Remove it and taste the result. We will either need to leave it in longer, add more chiles, or pierce more tiny ...


2

The original question asks about freezing apple juice to concentrate it. I can answer it as I have done it easily at home with unpasteurized cider. It works quite easily. How I did it was to just remove a little cider from the plastic 1gal jug and place it in the freezer for a couple days. After frozen I just took off the lid, set it upside down in a clean ...


2

As you have a Canadian website in your user profile, I assume you are asking about the legal requirements in Canada. Canada's Food and Drug Regulations state the following (emphasis mine): B.11.133 [S]. Reconstituted (naming the fruit) Juice or (naming the fruit) Juice from Concentrate (a) shall be fruit juice that has been prepared by the ...


2

I'll concentrate on this from a cooking/coffee-making point of view, but if experimenting on people you need to be careful and follow the appropriate local guidelines, even if you're only giving them substances you can buy in a supermarket. The design of the experiment must be done under supervision. That side of things would be off-topic here for good ...


2

Any vegetable can work. Cook vegetable (let's say carrot, for example), puree, pass through tami...you have a sauce. As @Stephie suggests above, better advice will depend on your plan. Vegetables can be juiced...that juice can be clarified (more like the result of the distillation process mentioned by @Fabby).


1

The easy way: Just: cut the veggies up in small cubes add twice as much water as veggies, boil in a pot with the lid on top on low heat until half the water is gone Throw away the veggies filter the extract The following might be illegal in your country: (though most countries allow either small batches or batches for personal use. If you don't know, ...


1

O-Cha.com says that a good ratio is 1g of tea leaves to 30g (i.e. 30mL) of water. Also keep in mind that, since Gyokuro is such a delicate tea, you want to brew with water that's between 120º and 140º F (50º to 60º C). This is much, much lower than regular black or green teas.


1

You can't. The compounds which make Jack Daniels taste like Jack Daniels are alcohol soluble and highly volatile. If you try cooking off the alcohol, the taste will evaporate together with the alcohol. If you are thinking of "rum essence" for baking, that's not derived from rum at all. It's simply ethylformate, and it's produced in a lab. You can mix ...


1

Apple juice or cider (unfermented) is fundamentally a sugar solution. As is any fruit juice. Water does, indeed, freeze out of solution first, leaving a more concentrated sugar solution. Having partially-frozen plastic jugs of cider inadvertently, what pours off is definitely concentrated (and what's left in the jug after the ice melts is then rather weak, ...


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