21

Summary for the Quick Reader Only the shape and size of the grains really makes a difference. Otherwise, salt is salt. What makes a difference between salts? There are only two real differentiators between different types of salt (assuming the product is essentially just salt, and not a seasoning blend): The mineral or other impurities resulting from ...


19

Two things control the "sharpness" of onions: variety and age. While certain varieties of onions are sharper than others (i.e. Reds, walla-walls and vidalias are sweeter), any onion which has been in storage too long is going to be sulphurous and sharp-tasting. Since it's January now, that's going to be pretty much all onions. Since onion sharpness comes ...


14

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


13

I make garlic paste quite often, using this technique I saw on Bobby Flay. Put the whole clove on the board. Lay knife flat, and smack it with your hand. Remove paper and root. Dice finely. Sprinkle with the quantity of salt your recipe calls for. With the knife relatively flat, grind the garlic into the salt with the knife. Typically, I'll make a pass in ...


13

Adding inclusions like vegetables, fruits, nuts, and meats to bread loaves and rolls is usually done either during the initial mixing stage or during shaping. When you should add the inclusions really depends on how large the ingredients are and how you want them distributed in the final loaf. When adding inclusions at the initial mix it is advisable to add ...


12

Honey is very stable for a number of reasons. The main ones though are the low amount of water (most honey is under 18% water) and the high amount of sugar (which is a preservative). Both of these things keep things like mold and bacteria from being able to grow. Over a long period of time (and if left unsealed) the honey could absorb moisture and then ...


11

I suppose the Belgian "curry ketchup" is similar to the German varieties and no, they are usually not only seasoned with curry powder, but also other spices. There is no standard seasoning mix for curry ketchup, but common additional spices are ginger, black pepper, paprika, cayenne or other chili powders. I also think that some brands contain onions. The ...


10

Garlic Press I like to use a garlic press for this sort of thing. You drop a whole clove or two in the device, squeeze, and you get a perfectly smooth garlic paste. The one downside is that it can be quite a pain to clean. Microplane There is also the Microplane (I'm not sure if there is a generic name for this type of rasp-style grater). Although I see ...


10

High fructose corn syrup is a preservative. While sugaring your ketchup is good for flavor, HFCS is great for shelf stability, as is the vinegar. The reasons you typically see HFCS in American Ketchups is that it is (1) heavily subsidized and domestic and cheap, (2) farmed by the same companies making the tomatoes, and (3) a preservative. Also, it helps to ...


10

Take the appropriate onion for the job. There are sweeter varieties of onions, typically the larger kind (mostly as large as apples), which have widely varying names. This kind of onion has a mellow flavor, and it is what is usually added to raw foods and salads, such as on gyros or so.


9

The traditional way is to use a mortar and pestle. It works with very small quantities. If you don't have a mortar and pestle, try approximating one with a cup rounded on the inside for the mortar and something sufficiently round for the pestle, for example the end of a rolling pin. It won't be as good as mortar and pestle, but will give you something ...


9

Interesting question. While I realize that dictionaries are descriptive, they're what we have to go by for common usage, so let's consult three: Wikipedia: A condiment is a spice, sauce, or preparation that is added to food to impart a particular flavor, to enhance its flavor,1 or in some cultures, to complement the dish. The term originally described ...


8

i've read that if you soak the chopped onion in cold water for a bit (5-10 mins) and then drain it well, it will lose much of its intensity.


8

Everyone who likes ketchup surely likes the sweet and tangy taste it always has, so in some sense the question's a bit circular. But I imagine part of the reason people started making it that way is that the sweetness helps cover up the sourness, so it can contain more vinegar (which helps preserve it) without tasting awful.


5

Strong plastic bag and a rolling pin


5

I go through a lot of hot sauce, and tend to just re-use old Tabasco bottles. The main choice you need to make is what size of orifice reducer do you need. I think that the best for most thin sauces is a glass bottle with the right size reducer. You know you've got the right size when one shake of the bottle dispenses about 1/4 of the amount of sauce that ...


5

You might give shrimp-based things a shot. If you have any kind of Asian grocery store around, you can probably find dried shrimp, shrimp paste, or even shrimp powder or bullion. You might find some of these things in Mexican grocery stores too, and shrimp broth-related stuff is sometimes sold in Western grocery stores too. You could also try other seafood-...


4

Food quality isn't binary; it doesn't go from perfectly good to perfectly bad in an instant. Even if it did, the time it would take depends on the storage temperature. And for non-liquid foods, it's possible that only a part went bad (how well does it mix?). So, you don't get a precise date, but a rough interval at which time the decay starts to set in. As ...


4

Absolutely! I have had great results with tomatoes directly against the cheese. I can't quite put my finger on why, but no matter where else I've tried putting the tomato slice it just isn't quite as excellent as right up against the cheese (the cheese being right up against the bread in this example (separated only by your favorite choice of lipid =) )) ...


4

If you want high fat, there's a regional thing in West Virgnia of 'pepperoni rolls', which you can use as a basic dough and technique. You could likely adapt it for other fatty foods ... except for the bacon; I wouldn't use bacon, even if you pre-cooked it first, just because it'd be too firm. For the bacon, I'd cook it, break it into bits, and then stir ...


4

Mustard is mostly vinegar, so instead of diluting mustard with water, try vinegar, or vinegar and water.


3

Curry Ketchup is made with a Ketchup base, but then adds Curry, vinegar, a small amount of spices like pepprika, and two little known ingredients... apples and soy sauce... if you make it to this recipe then you can get close. See the following from Hienz Water, sugar, tomato paste (17%), vinegar, apples, modified starch, curry (2.2%) (contains mustard and ...


3

Cutting board and a flat, heavy pan. Just grab the edges of the pan firmly and apply your weight down, creating some arcing motions from side to side.


3

If I need one, I usually use guar gum as thickening agent in raw dishes. The result is similar to using corn starch, it is more or less without flavour, but does not need heat to activate. I would probably dissolve some in the orange juice and then mix with the other ingredients.


3

Depending on the heat level of your sauce of course. You could make quite an impression on your guests.


3

Is it roasted chili paste (น้ำพริกเผา in Thai)?


3

After chopping the onion, rinse it with cold water and then soak overnight in non-skim milk.


3

I am a Ph.D. synthetic chemist. I want to share some tricks I have used you might not know about. If you want raw onions that are not sharp soak in either vinegar or lime or lemon juice or salt water prior to use. After burn is removed- can test vs. time- drain off solution before use. The result are onions raw you can use in cooking. OR simple microwave ...


3

Chop the onion into tiny cubes and plate in a container with a lid. Add a small amount of vinegar and shake the onion until it begs for mercy. When it comes out it will be sweet and retain its flavour. It always works for me.


3

I don't think any kind of dilution will work. The water in your mustard jar is a lot more like mustard with the solids filtered out than mustard with extra liquid added. It's roughly in equilibrium with the mustard itself, so it's nice and full of all the mustard aromatics. If you add water, you reduce that concentration, and get something much less ...


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