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Summary for the Quick Reader Only the shape and size of the grains really makes a difference. Otherwise, salt is salt. What makes a difference between salts? There are only two real differentiators between different types of salt (assuming the product is essentially just salt, and not a seasoning blend): The mineral or other impurities resulting from ...


14

Yes, it can change the taste quite significantly. Here's an easy experiment that you can do: Make a sandwich, but spread mustard on only one of the pieces of bread. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side up. Take a bite of the sandwich, mustard-side down. Mouth feel is affected as well, but not quite as dramatically.


13

Adding inclusions like vegetables, fruits, nuts, and meats to bread loaves and rolls is usually done either during the initial mixing stage or during shaping. When you should add the inclusions really depends on how large the ingredients are and how you want them distributed in the final loaf. When adding inclusions at the initial mix it is advisable to add ...


9

Interesting question. While I realize that dictionaries are descriptive, they're what we have to go by for common usage, so let's consult three: Wikipedia: A condiment is a spice, sauce, or preparation that is added to food to impart a particular flavor, to enhance its flavor,1 or in some cultures, to complement the dish. The term originally described ...


5

You might give shrimp-based things a shot. If you have any kind of Asian grocery store around, you can probably find dried shrimp, shrimp paste, or even shrimp powder or bullion. You might find some of these things in Mexican grocery stores too, and shrimp broth-related stuff is sometimes sold in Western grocery stores too. You could also try other seafood-...


4

Absolutely! I have had great results with tomatoes directly against the cheese. I can't quite put my finger on why, but no matter where else I've tried putting the tomato slice it just isn't quite as excellent as right up against the cheese (the cheese being right up against the bread in this example (separated only by your favorite choice of lipid =) )) ...


4

If you want high fat, there's a regional thing in West Virgnia of 'pepperoni rolls', which you can use as a basic dough and technique. You could likely adapt it for other fatty foods ... except for the bacon; I wouldn't use bacon, even if you pre-cooked it first, just because it'd be too firm. For the bacon, I'd cook it, break it into bits, and then stir ...


4

Mustard is mostly vinegar, so instead of diluting mustard with water, try vinegar, or vinegar and water.


3

I don't think any kind of dilution will work. The water in your mustard jar is a lot more like mustard with the solids filtered out than mustard with extra liquid added. It's roughly in equilibrium with the mustard itself, so it's nice and full of all the mustard aromatics. If you add water, you reduce that concentration, and get something much less ...


3

I am a Ph.D. synthetic chemist. I want to share some tricks I have used you might not know about. If you want raw onions that are not sharp soak in either vinegar or lime or lemon juice or salt water prior to use. After burn is removed- can test vs. time- drain off solution before use. The result are onions raw you can use in cooking. OR simple microwave ...


3

Chop the onion into tiny cubes and plate in a container with a lid. Add a small amount of vinegar and shake the onion until it begs for mercy. When it comes out it will be sweet and retain its flavour. It always works for me.


3

Curry Ketchup is made with a Ketchup base, but then adds Curry, vinegar, a small amount of spices like pepprika, and two little known ingredients... apples and soy sauce... if you make it to this recipe then you can get close. See the following from Hienz Water, sugar, tomato paste (17%), vinegar, apples, modified starch, curry (2.2%) (contains mustard and ...


2

I drop them in boiling water for 60 seconds. Reduces some of the bite but keeps some of the crispness. I use for potato salad and add finely chopped celery for a bit of crunch


2

It's the fat that actually cuts the spiciness - see my answer on making a sauce less spicy/hot. When you're dealing with the type of spiciness that's reduced by cream (generally capsaicin), it's pretty safe to assume that it's fat-soluble, and the same principles apply when you're using the "reducer" as a condiment vs. including it in the recipe. There's ...


2

24 quarts would be about 23 kilos. Xantham gum is generally used for thickening in an amount of .15% to .5% by weight. So the expected range would be 34 to 115 grams. Start small, thickening with xantham gum can get snotty. Work up slowly, mixing thoroughly, until you reach the thickening you want. You may find that a combination of cornstarch and xanthan ...


2

To a certain extent, it depends on the condiment. For things like oil or vinegar, where germs generally can't really survive anyway, there is no need for refrigeration. On the other hand, things like ketchup, mayonnaise, or any other emulsions (tahini for instance) should be kept in the fridge. It also depends on whether the pack is sealed or has come into ...


2

Beside the dictionary answers, I think is quite reasonable to think of condiments as those products that impart tastes to food as well as nutritional values but are not easily or pleasant to consume alone; impart taste but are of negligible nutritional relevance. Among the first examples are oil and butter, among the second ones mustard and salt.* This ...


2

From your Edit, it looks like you have narrowed the problem down to the egg yolks. Did anyone else taste your original batch of lemon curd? If you still have original batch, you may have a close friend or relative see if they can taste difference. For years (side effect of medication) I would perceive either "off or metallic taste" which my husband or ...


2

Fermented chopped chili (duojiao) or pickled pepper (pao jiao) would be a good alternative in terms of flavor: spicy, tingly, salty, umami. The two are prepared using a very similar recipe, with the former the Hunanese variant and the later the Szechuanese varient. The usage, however, is very different from that of Lao Gan Ma: Lao Gan Ma is usually added to ...


1

Barring the thickening with finely sieved hard-boiled egg/egg-yolk, this combination is heading in the direction of Thousand Island dressing. Given that recipe is so variable, you could just about get away with calling it that.


1

I do not think that there is a definite time period that can be given for this question. In the UK, and I think this is the same for all of Europe, foods that do not spoil because of microbes are given a minimum expected lifespan. Companies fully complying with the law do not need to invest any more money in, i.e. bother to research, finding an upper limit. ...


1

I couldn't find a previous answer specific to sell by dates and condiments. Most condiments, mayo with egg included, are made safe by creating an inhospitable environment for bacterial growth. The addition of acids (i.e, vinegar, lemon) or other "preservatives" accomplishes this. Sell by dates are usually an indicator of quality, not safety. Items such ...


1

I used hon-mirin exclusively when I lived in Japan, simply because it tasted better. My Japanese neighbor was surprised that I could tell the difference, and confessed (somewhat embarrassedly) that she used aji-mirin since her family couldn't tell the difference. However, I cannot buy hon-mirin in the US (I'm not 21, and hon-mirin is sold as wine while ...


1

I looked at the first 8 recipes that came up on a Google search. All but one just said "Dry White Wine". One said, "dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc". So, I would say that's your answer. Any dry white wine will do, perhaps Sauvignon Blanc might be ideal.


1

I have always advocated that a, "toasted" Chicken-Cheese-Tomato sandwich is NOT the same as a toasted Chicken-Tomato-Cheese, or toasted Cheese-Chicken-Tomato sandwich. The reason being the heat melts the cheese. In the first one the cheese binds everything together where as with the rest, it stick one ingredient to the bread and the sandwich loses its ...


1

In addition to the really high sugar-content, Honey has antibacterial properties; so far that some kinds of honey are used as an antibiotic on wounds. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100630111037.htm has an article on that aspect of honey. This adds to the "no spoiling" capabilities of honey, because it will prevent any bacteria-related ...


1

Not likely. Standard curry powders are really not good if they are added to anything and left raw (some brands might not even be safe!), they tend to taste raw, unharmonic, floury, bitter then ... Adding them while MAKING the ketchup, or adding it to the ketchup then cooking the resulting sauce, or blooming it in hot oil THEN adding it to ketchup, could ...


1

Well done on using fennel for salmon, keep on trying other recipes. I grew up in Czechoslovakia, and we used a lot of dill in sauces, pickled gherkins, cucumber salad etc. I never knew what fennel was then. Yesterday my neighbour Nicky gave me a lot fennel tops to use. So I tried them with salmon steaks and pesto sauce, in the absence of dill. My husband and ...


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