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What you can see in the jar is peanut oil, which has separated and floats on top. It means, you have bought a non-homogenized product, possibly an "all-natural" or "organic" product. Just stir the oil into the thick paste at the bottom and use as usual. For a discussion on how to best achieve this, see What's the most effective way to mix a jar of natural ...


11

The cinnamon "sludge" is fiber. The fiber that came from the cinnamon is soluble in water. 10 grams of cinnamon is about 8 grams of fiber (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamon). It is safe to eat / drink (fiber!) in moderate amount (Chinese cinnamon or cassia is not safe in high dose because of its toxic component called coumarin). Of course, cinnamon ...


11

Flour and cornmeal are well known to clump when added cold to boiling water. Such clumps arise when starch molecules unball and forming a mesh that traps other starch molecules, preventing them from hydrolysing in the same way. Hence lumpy gravy and sauces. For oatmeal I've observed similar clumping behaviour, but not to the same extent. Anyway I suspect ...


6

I have done this before and it has worked for me. It should work, but if it doesn't, I know what will. My aunt sold Jam for a while and when the pectin didn't work she reheated and added a small amount of gelatin, I helped her stir it in, and that was the final fix for her bad mix.


6

Welcome to Seasoned Advice first I will point you to an article in our blog Silpat, Parchment Paper or Plain Baking Sheet. @KatieK contrasts these cooking surfaces.Look at the instructions for time and temp. Are you thoroughly Preheating? You pictures indicate that you are using parchment, but you don't mention time/temp. My first inclination based on what ...


5

Actually, you can make an emulsion using just garlic and olive oil! It's a very old spanish recipe traditionally done by hand taking mind numbing time. Seeing that you want to achieve thickness using your existing ingredients (no cheating with emulsifiers) here is a suggestion that should work (i haven't done it, just seen it done). Pay attention to the ...


5

Those pictures suggest two things to me: Butter too warm. The point of letting your butter sit on the counter is to let it warm up to room temperature. But if the room is too warm, then the butter gets too melty. Aim for about 65 degrees F, a somewhat cooler room temperature. (FWIW, I never bother to cut butter into cubes for cookies - the stand mixer ...


5

In my reading, injera is a sourdough-leavened flatbread, and it does indeed have the consistency you describe. I've made it with wheat and (the more traditional) teff flour. It's not sweet or quick-bread (in any sense!) but is fun, tasty, and worth a try to eat or make. If I'm understanding correctly, what you're looking for is a pancake with qualities I'm ...


5

The texture and yield is governed two factors: developing the gluten completely and washing out the bran and starch effectively. To develop the gluten, combine the flour and water into a workable dough and give it 50 light strokes. Cover the bowl and let it rest 10-15 minutes. It is during this time that water chemically combines with the flour and the ...


5

There are two things you can do to make the mousse stiffer: Reduce the water from the fruit. So use some kind of concentrate instead of the pure fruit. For example, you could cook down a syrup or jam and add it to the mousse. Or see if dehydrating juice gets you somewhere. Use more fat. Instead of whipping cream at 30 to 35% fat, you could use double-...


4

I think the problem is your cream, but not your fault if your recipe didn't mention it anymore. For a Bavarian cream, you normally whip cream and put it in the mixture in the end, to make it more light and also less liquid. In that case, I think your amount of gelatin would be enough, since you'd only have a good 250 ml of liquid (but not all gelatin sheets ...


4

The spice powder clumps together because it has been exposed to moisture. Carbohydrates or proteins in the spice dissolve a small amount, becoming sticky, causing the granules to stick together. To prevent this, keep your spices quite dry: If you buy in bulk, consider transferring some to a "currently being used" container, and leaving the rest away ...


4

Since nobody has answered yet, I took a shot at this one from the opposite direction: searching for solutions to a too-dense pie hoping to find some steps that were "wrong" for the questioner but would be right for your opposite goal of denser pie. This is how one remedied his too-dense pie; in the link is the recipe from which he made his modifications: ...


4

It will firm up a little bit during chilling, but not much. It is certainly supposed to be firm enough to keep its shape on its own when taken out. If you have baked creme caramel or cheesecake, then try to get it to a similar consistency as these. If you haven't, you may want to use a roast thermometer. The final temperature (assuming a traditional flan ...


4

If it's pretzel bread, it may be dipped in a hot soda solution before baking, or lye for the brave and very, very careful. That would mostly be about the crust, rather than the density. Several sources suggest baking baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to convert it to (food grade) sodium carbonate for a stronger (than bicarbonate) alkali without needing to ...


4

Honey is hygroscopic - meaning it has the ability to absorb water. Even if you covered your porridge after adding the honey, there's still enough moisture in the container for the honey to absorb. You don't say whether your honey is from a local beekeeper or heat-treated store honey. The more honey is heated, the more natural enzymes found in honey are ...


4

Blueberries are generally low-pectin fruits, so many jam recipes and jam making guides specifically call for adding pectin. That said, some do not - but these use the whole pureed fruit. When you filter out the seeds and skin, you remove much of what pectin there is in blueberries naturally, leaving you with runny jam. The solution, then, is to add pectin ...


3

After having to avoid consuming powdered cinnamon for months, I've recently found out the method to prevent it from turning into a slime when mixed with water or tea (hot or cold). The trick is to mix the cinnamon with honey first. You can mix 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon with a teaspoon or two of honey, and stir it up very well so that the mixture becomes ...


3

If you want non-spreading cookies, you chose the wrong recipe. use a shortening-based recipe. Shortening has very different melting qualities from butter. It stays solid for longer. Use cake flour instead of all-purpose flour, it soaks up a bit more liquid so it helps reducing spread. you also need a more acidic dough against spread, says Corriher (sadly,...


3

To all the excellent advice already given, the best of which is that your dough is too wet, here are a couple more things to consider: Just because the oven knob says 350 doesn't mean that's the temperature. Actually, that was my first clue my oven was broken - my cookies spread too much and didn't brown on the bottom. If you haven't done this already, ...


3

Assuming the chestnut puree is just chestnuts, well, use 250g of it. If it has other ingredients... I guess you'll have to try to figure out how much of them. You might be able to deduce it from the nutrition facts and the nutritional content of the chestnuts themselves, especially it's just chestnuts and water. Edit: To be clear, I'm telling you how to ...


3

This is debatable. I work at cafes and the one I was recently at their mixture was extremely sticky. They're very yum though so I think it depends if you want rich and cheesy scone or a dry one (the ones old people eat in England, kidding). I think we have adapted here in NZ.


3

This is actually not answerable as an absolute. One of the Great Unknowns when baking with flour is how humid it has been in your flour storage recently, and thus how much water is already in the flour. I've had a few cups of flour require as much as half a cup extra water to get the right consistency depending on the season. My usual approach for making ...


3

Assuming your roux is flour based, the original recipe mixture was able to be a sauce because the proteins in the flour formed gluten and created that lovely thickness we enjoy (your seasonings sound like a nice combo). The water from the other ingredients are trapped in the gluten. Unfortunately, when you freeze it, the water molecules form sharp shapes ...


3

I know what you mean...most commercial pancakes are spongy and I love them. For approx. 2 cups of flour or pancake mix, add a nice handful (1/4 cup) of farina (fine cream of wheat) to the liquid and warm a little to soften. I also let the batter sit. Works pretty well in my griddle.


3

Not really, unless you go for a different carbohydrate with physical properties similar to refined sucrose. And if you are removing the sugar for dietary reasons, you're probably not winning anything by doing the substitution. Artificial sweeteners and stevia are just that - a sweetener, not a sugar. They can only be successfully used as a substitute where ...


3

This has the looks of a heavily enriched bread. Being dense is only a side effect of this. The taste people like in enriched bread doesn't come from being dense, and if you tried any other method of making it dense (e.g. using whole flours), you'd be disappointed. Look for recipes which use sufficient milk, fat and eggs, and try these. Although lots of fat ...


3

However much you are making, use this ratio: 4 parts heavy cream/whipping cream to 2 parts sweetened condensed milk to 2 parts passionfruit pulp. Make sure that before you start, you whip the heavy cream until it holds in stiff peaks. This results in a mousse that has an almost custard-like consistency, but with a lighter feel. I don't know how to make a ...


3

Your description of the end result as "pasty" (which I'm interpreting as "very think, like a paste instead of a thick soup") implies to me that there was too much roux for the amount of liquid. And since the strength of a roux is determined by the amount of flour, I don't think sauteing the onions separately would have had much effect. Without having the ...


2

If you have a bit of sun (as it is a summertime method); * Pour the jam into a tray and leave it under the sun for some days. Check and stir the jam time to time until it reaches to desired thichness. *The top of the tray should be covered with a thin cotton cloth/muslin in case any dust etc. not to get into the jam while it is still having sun and breating. ...


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