19

This is the date the item was manufactured. The upper dial gives the year, the middle one, the month. The bottom indicator could be a mold identifier, and in some cases, it might be a shift indicator (although this would typically be a clock going from 1 to 3, 4, or 6 depending on how shifts are allocated rather than the example showing 0 to 5). See e.g. ...


14

Vinegar is an acid and acids are not stored in metal, it eats them. Some are less reactive, like stainless steel, but still not a good idea. Normally plastic is fine, that is what vinegar is often marketed in, but glass is usually best as the main container, but lid should either not be metal or should be fully and well coated, and I would tend to avoid ...


13

First off I want to point out the term "fresh". While some containers might keep milk from spoiling for longer, it may not taste as nice. Several things might be why: 1.) Plastics leach flavor and odor into the milk. Cardboard cartons are also lined with plastic, not wax since about the 1940s. I would say this is likely the biggest impact-- I've always ...


11

Around here, they're called 'deli containers'. Those are specifically the heavier weight ones that can deal with hot foods. I don't see delis using them much anymore (they've switched to thinner, less expensive ones), but all of the restaurants near me that sell soup as takeout use them. They generally go for $0.08 to $0.20 in bulk, depending on how many ...


9

The used lid had already somewhat degraded when you put vinegar on the jar. These coated self-sealing lids are used in bottling salsa - obviously :) - jams, pickles, condiments, etc all which vary from mild to medium acidity. They work well for the purpose and for the length of time before the contents are used up. But they were never meant for long term ...


8

I would suggest using a can punch. Punch a hole on both of the shorter sides on top, one to pour with and the other to allow air flow. If you are unsure what a can punch is.... here is a pic Hope this helps.


6

As identified in my original comment, the most likely risk is not from the container itself, but from the fact that it's meant to be used with an immersion blender. Heat actually isn't a major problem with polypropylene (PP). It's generally regarded as food-safe and is BPA-free (see here and here for references), and its melting point is somewhere between ...


6

I suspect that it's the source of the milk rather than the container. The shorter the supply chain from cow to your refrigerator, the longer the milk will last in your refrigerator. Mass-produced supermarket milk, which is generally (always?) sold in low-cost plastic containers, spends more time being shipped and distributed than locally-sourced organic milk,...


5

The best reason I can come up with is that microwaving items with oil and/or fat can lead to temperatures much higher than the 90C maximum that is recommended. From the link: Microwave, dishwasher and freezer safe Suitable for temperatures up to 90c Not suitable for foods with a high fat or sugar content


5

I've used the harsch crocks myself - for longer ferments (3-8 weeks). However I've used the giant glass pickle jars for beets when making kvas for borscht. The thing with the harsch is it takes the guessing out - once you seal it you don't really have to worry about anything except keeping the little water lip filled. Fermenting in glass jars, to me, ...


4

Hotel pans are primarily used in institutional settings because everything is already made to fit them. Steam tables, prep coolers, etc, are all made to fit hotel pans and their fractional sizes. While I agree with the comments that they aren't generally the best pan suited to many tasks, they are great because they are fairly inexpensive and can be stacked ...


3

Any jar sold for home canning will work for what you want. They are designed to handle temperatures higher than 212°F/100°C. What you want to avoid is thermal shock - a large and rapid change of temperature. Don't put cool/cold jar(s) in boiling water, don't put hot jar(s) directly on cool counter or in refrigerator/freezer. Don't fill cold jar(s) with hot ...


3

This should be a hint: ...stackable and come with lids and seem relatively sturdy. If they're relatively sturdy, then they're not really disposable. There's no need for something to be sturdy if you're going to throw it away after one use. So, look for plastic containers that suit your needs, and reuse them until they break. If they're on the cheap side,...


3

Stainless steel, as you would know, is an alloy with more than 80 percent iron, with chromium and nickel being the other components. Chromium brings shine and nickel brings elasticity to stainless steel. Nickel is a costly alloy, it costs 20 times iron - and hence most low-grade stainless steel is made from zero to 2 percent nickel, when it should ideally ...


3

The problem with carbonated liquids is cavitation. In normal water, if you spin up a propellor fast enough, you'll cause the disolved gasses to come out; this causes dramatic wear on the blades/fins, and in some cases, can cause fatigue resulting in them tearing off. This is actually a major issue in pump and boat propellor design. If you're dealing with ...


3

I find that using the corner of my clever nearest the handle to make small holes on two of the corners of the can is best, for me anyway. You can control the size of the holes and make for a more controlled pour. By the way, the churchkey is called that because the pointy end pointed up looks like a steeple.


3

Plastic is an amorphous solid. This means that it doesn't have a sharp melting point like water, but it goes through a state where it is softer and softer, until it turns liquid. So yes, the plastic was in this state when you touched it. If you want to call this transitional state "melted", then it was melted. Unless you prefer to call it "softened". ...


3

To mix, use any bowl that won't be damaged by the salt. I would stay away from metal or wood, anything else would be fine. To store, just use a glass jar. I usually use a half gallon canning jar, but if you're making a lot you can use a gallon jar. Cover the cabbage with a big flat cabbage leaf. (Or a grape leaf). Press down, so the leaf is covered ...


3

Bread bowls are frequently used to serve thick soups, so they could probably hold coffee or hot chocolate. Here is a patent application for an edible cup. It might give you some ideas. See also, this project, where an industrial designer is attempting to replace disposable containers with edible ones. Probably critical is how hot your liquid will be, and ...


3

Dense, hard bread was used as plates, historically - trenchers - even for foods that can be generously sauced. Some of the liquid might soak in, but the structure should remain sound. I would imagine a dense cracker, like hardtack, could be shaped into a cup and baked hard, and then used without leaking. A fluffy/airy cracker would sog up pretty quickly, ...


3

Yes, it's likely to change the time. There is no way to predict how it will change it, though, since it is a combination of the material, mass and shape of the vessel. So you'll have to test it for each vessel you use.


2

Top to bottom: Year, Month, Week. See D-M-E injection mold components catalog p157. If a problem turns up, the date markers will allow the investgating team to run down the batch.


2

Use a bucket. Lid sold separately, about ~20 for the two of them. Alternatively, you can pick up an oak barrel. They tend to be much more expensive in the 150-200 range. You could make your own container out of clay, though price effectiveness is questionable More to the point, I think you underestimate the utility and glory that is plastic. Any container ...


2

It seems likely that there was some form of residue left behind in the container; whether this was actual soap or just the scent is difficult to determine. I have found that soap scents do tend to cling a bit more stubbornly to plastic than they do to other materials, but that's just my experience. Next time you might try rinsing the container and drying ...


2

I personally use squeeze bottles to store my citrus juices, including pre-strained lemon juice. They're nearly identical to these versions from Amazon (though more colorful) which I like because they have a built-in cap to keep the container sealed. There are a number of other styles sold, but know that most don't include caps. The small tips make them ...


2

The plastic containers you depict are easily obtainable as to-go containers at restaurant supply stores. They are known as plastic to-go bowls or containers.


2

Those containers look to be about 16 oz to me. If you search for "16 oz disposable containers with lids" you should find what you are looking for. I found these on Amazon UK, which cost about £10 for 50. They are microwaveable and dishwasher safe, so can be reused.


2

The food and hospitality industry faces the same problem as you do: restaurants want to store food in a space-efficient manner, but for decades, a business model in which a mom-and-pop place gets a manufacturer to produce 15 containers of their perfect dimension was not viable. Nowadays mass customization is theoretically possible, but the industry has ...


2

Just found these: https://freundcontainer.com/plastic-square-snap-lock-containers-w-tamper-evident-lid/ took me awhile, but I prefer these to traditonal round deli quart/pint containers. No wasted space when placed side-by-side, they also stack more securely without flopping around. Hopefully this helps somebody looking for the same thing.


2

In many kitchens, certain staple items are a source of both the item, and its container for re-use. Don't know if that's what's going on in the pictured kitchen, but it certainly goes on at the one professional kitchen I have some regular inside contact with. Sour cream tubs, mozzerella ball buckets, fish boxes all get re-used (after cleaning and sanitizing, ...


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