6

Convection simply moves air around to heat evenly. I don't suggest cooking pizza in a microwave oven at all. If you don't want to use a conventional oven I would suggest trying to cook the pizza on a cast iron skillet instead. The secret to pizza is to cook as hot and quickly as possible, both top and bottom. This is more difficult to achieve in a pan, but ...


3

If all you have is a convection microwave to cook with and the choice is microwave or convection mode then do convection mode as it's closer to baking. Microwaving a pizza will most likely turn it into overcooked rubber, convection gives you a chance. It's a good idea to cut the pizza into manageable chunks that the oven mode can handle, don't cram it in. ...


2

After so much trial and error, I found the solution, and yet, it's so simple: Leave the oven door open for 2 minutes when preheating, then close. And I also turn the fan on for preheating, I think it will make it more effective. It doesn't turn off by itself anymore.


2

The fan isn't for frying only: it helps to regulate the heat more consistently and hastens the cooking/baking process. Turning off the fan doesn't turn off the element, however, so it will only slow down the baking process. If the instructions indicate that you turn the fan off, it could be because the item you're baking should bake at a very slow rate. This,...


1

There's something else that you may need to test -- how many pans you have in the oven at one time. Most home ovens only have two racks, so you're never cooking more than two sheets of cookies at a time. This means that they'll have radiant heat from either the top of bottom. Some cookie recipes are so sensitive to radiant heat that they'll specifically ...


1

I think there are a couple things to troubleshoot here. Check that the oven is working. you can buy an in oven thermometer to verify that you are getting accurate readings. seems you have done this already. Could the oven be steam-injection? that could cause some problems with done-ness. Maybe some other part of your process is different now that you are ...


1

Cooking by time and weight is extremely unreliable. Get an electronic thermometer, insert the probe into the meat and watch the temperature on the display on the counter. When the breasts are 150°F (66°C) and the thighs 165°F (74°C), it's done. (Try the probe in a few places to ensure there are no cool spots.) No weighing, no timing, no guessing. The ...


1

As far as I know, pre-heating to 25°-30° allows for the decrease in temperature when you put whatever in. It looses 10° every second that your oven is open. There's also another suggestion saying. preheating longer than x minutes could. automatically turn the oven off. Your burners go on and off based on the oven temp. When the burners go off, ...


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