30

I can't tell you exact differences, but it is known that differences do exist. US flour is frequently bleached. This is illegal in the EU, I don't know how it is in Israel. I don't know what flour your recipes are made for. In the US, "all purpose" flour tends to be closest to German 550 flour, and cake recipes in Europe may have been made with German 405 ...


18

Looks like a misprint for Pound. The point of Pound Cake is that you use the same amount of each ingredient - for example, a pound.


16

According to the nutella nutritional fact label, 1 tbsp = 19g. There are 16 tbsp in a cup so 16 * 19g = 304g


15

No. 350F is exactly the same as 176.66...C Follow the recipe in exactly the same way


13

Every sourdough starter has different characteristics, a ladleful of one will give a different result from the same amount of another. The recipe is right in that there's no way to say what result you are going to get, so why be exact. The point I would make is that you want repeatibility, and the capability to adjust your amounts over time to suit your ...


12

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


11

With cookies you need to be aware of ALL the things that can be different. First of all the flour, which can be enriched, bleached etc., and which rarely has a grade that tells you how finely milled it is. If you bought relatively coarsely-milled flour, such as the flour that's usually used to make shortbread, then you might get the results you described. ...


10

Brownies are bar cookies. Note that the brownies are at the edge of the pan are more cooked, and raised higher: they set before they settle back down. Baking the brownies in a mini-muffin tin will essentially make each mini-brownie all edge. They will rise and set very rapidly, and then easily over bake. I would suggest that brownies are not ideal in a ...


10

It's asking for exactly what it says: 8 cups of broccoli. Measuring by volume is certainly best-defined for liquids, but it works fine for solids too. It works best if you have a large measuring bowl - or just a bowl that you happen to know is around 8 cups (two quarts, about two liters). Or you can just guess by eye, knowing how much volume that is. A ...


10

Rather than try to determine the weight of the cream do the following. Measure out 250g of water in your container. Mark the waterline on your container with a marker or tape Measure your cream based on your mark This way you don't need to know the weight of your cream, you simply need to find a container with the proper volume.


10

A round of bread or butter seems to be a term that is used by some English speakers, but I'm not sure where from. I'm not sure what equivalent measurement it has, if it even has an exact measurement, but I think it has the idea of an entire piece of butter. Survey of English Dialects: Slices of bread alongside a round of butter and a hillock of sea or ...


9

According to the charts at Alicia Noelle Jones, the density of cream is very, very close to that of water. Depending on the type of cream and the temperature at which you compare (remember, water is densest at about 4 degrees C), the density of cream varies from about 0.978 to 1.021 that of water. As you can see, the largest variation is about 2%. Unless ...


8

I have just cooked 290 grams of dried chickpeas which filled 1 cup, in a pressure cooker. After cooking the drained weight was 616 grams or 2.12 times the dry weight. The volume was 3.75 cups or 3.75 the dried volume


8

The USDA guidelines for canning dried peas or beans (or here) gives the rule of thumb that 12 ounces of dried peas/beans produces 1 quart (32 fluid ounces) of canned product. That's a ratio of 3 oz dry per 8 fl oz cooked. They don't specifically mention chickpeas in the document, but the same ratio appears in other places, here for example. At that ratio, 7....


8

There's nothing wrong with your conversions, they were fine. What you may not have considered is: Convection versus non-convection ovens. When you see a recipe in F it's most likely from the US, and in the US convection ovens are rare. Convection ovens cook with more intensity than non-convection ovens as the fan blows hot air, so when using a recipe for a ...


8

I agree with @rumtscho that you are unlikely to get the desired results from canned corn as you really probably need raw. If you do try canned, make sure it is whole kernel type and that might improve your results. If you cannot get fresh corn, frozen, uncooked corn might work, but even that is usually blanched which might be enough to change the results ...


7

This table comes from the front of the muffin section in Bread, by Beth Hensperger: Muffin size Baking time Yield Mini/gem (1 5/8") 10-15 minutes 18-20 Regular (2 3/4") 20-25 minutes 9-10 Oversized (3 1/4") 25-30 minutes 6-7 Muffin cake (8-9") 55-65 minutes 1 The baking times are for 375-400°F; most recipes will fall around ...


7

I actually measured and weighed a cup of Nutella and I got 290g. Of course we have to take into consideration my 1 cup measurement (I'm pretty sure they are not exactly the same) and my scale. But it just shows that the 300g mark is not far off.


7

This is a more tricky conversion than most. As another answer already said, the "standard" conversion for most herbs is 3 parts fresh = 1 part dried. (There is more general advice on that question in the link rumtscho gave in comments here.) Basil is a particular problem because its flavor is generally very different in dried vs. fresh forms. Dried basil ...


7

Yes, ladles differ in capacity. My advice, just use whatever ladle you happen to have. If it were critical to the success or the edibility of the resulting food, the amount would hopefully have been specified a little better. Cooking is regarded by many common people as an art or practical activity, not an exact science (more like dancing than "coding"), so ...


6

On my Nutella jar it says that 2 tablespoons of the deliciousness is 37 grams. So, 37x8= 296 grams of Nutella is one cup.


6

Here's my trick for measuring sticky, dense things like Nutella: Take whatever liquid you're using and measure an amount, like 1 cup. add the Nutella to the liquid and the level will rise to the measurement you need. For example, if I need 1/2 cup of Nutella and there is milk in my recipe, I'll put 1 cup of milk on my measuring cup, add enough Nutella to ...


6

It varies by material. A tablespoon (or millilitre) is a unit of volume; a gram of weight. The ratio between the two is called the density, and that varies a lot. So, you have to look it up, or weight it yourself. Or, if you're lucky, it's on the side of the package. You can access some of the measurement conversions in the USDA NDB data files I posted a ...


6

Yes, me too, I bought mini muffin shaped brownies in a bag and loved the idea so much I wanted to try it myself, so I bought a mini muffin tin especially for that purpose. I read all the answers above to get some guidance. Then I decided to use my favorite brownie recipe from 'Handle the Heat' http://www.handletheheat.com/ultimate-brownies/, with no ...


6

Unfortunately sorting bread pans by loaf weight is very vague. A 1lb light and fluffy white sandwich bread might have about the same size as a 2lb heavy, dense wholegrain or rye bread. Also, do you expect your bread to rise really high over the rim or should that be more of a limit? In short, the size of "a 1lb bread" depends a lot on the kind of bread you ...


5

I remember when cake mixes included the number of strokes needed to mix the batter by hand. The Betty Crocker FAQ website (a U.S. baking mix company) suggests 150 strokes per each minute of electric mixer time recommended. Note: that is not 150 strokes per minute! So if the directions call for 2 minutes of mixing, that translates to 300 strokes. Betty ...


5

I estimated that 1 cup of nutella is around 294 grams: I bought a jar of 350 grams of nutella, used a marker to indicate the nutella level of the jar. Emptied it (I was gonna use it for cookies anyway adjusting the recipe to just one 1 jar). After cleaning the jar out. I put it on a scale and filled with water. In went 282 grams of water = 282 milliliter ...


5

Well 1.5 cups is volumetric so the weight will depend on how tightly packed that cup is, if they are chopped, etc. On average though, 1.5 cups of chopped hazelnuts is about 6.08 oz (172 g) according to the USDA's averages. You can check the USDA's National Nutrient Database page for hazelnuts if you want to see estimated weights for 1.5 cups of whole, ...


5

Stewing or braising is essentially what slow cookers do, so there is not a huge difference in converting a stew recipe. There are two main issues to consider: Flavor development. You may choose to sear or brown your ingredients separately, and then deglaze for your base sauce. Most slow cookers cannot create the browning, so it would need to be done ...


5

Looks like the term you want is "French buttercream". American buttercream is, as you say, full of sugar but rarely has eggs, relying on powdered sugar and butter with a bit of wet in the form of a dash of milk, cream, or alcohol. French buttercream is based on egg yolks and contains relatively little sugar and is cooked over a double boiler. French ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible