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32

Think shortbread / pie dough: If you have a food processor, dump the butter & dry ingredients in, pulse until you have a coarse crumble. Add some liquid - either your egg (beaten!) or, even simpler, just as much milk as needed to help the dough to stick together. I personally would use milk instead of egg for lighter cookies. Eggs might make them too ...


27

You can reuse parchment paper several times for your cookies (it also works for other dry dishes), depending on cooking time and temperature, with no problem. Change the paper when it gets dirty, dark and/or brittle as it may crumble beyond this point. I always do so with no difference in the results, saving both on money and waste.


26

Yes, the original recipes involved an enormous amount of trial and error. People baked, swapped recipes, and the good ones were desirable and became widespread, while the bad ones died out. The advanced knowledge of food chemistry wasn't even available at the time - Hannah Glasse published her cookbook more then 100 years before Mendeleev published the ...


23

First of all, lye is not "water boiled with ash". You might be thinking of potash, which used to be used as lye, but virtually all food-grade lye today is sodium hydroxide. In terms of its function, it largely raises the alkalinity (pH). Baking soda does too, but sodium hydroxide is far more potent - let's just say you don't want to get any on your hands ...


23

There are no similarities between the process of making caramel and making cookies. Pure caramel has one ingredient, sugar. This sugar is cooked on the stove and brought to a high temperature until it changes color. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 340 °F (170 °C). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and ...


21

Salt has unique properties in how it interacts with the taste buds. While it has its own "flavor" it also has the ability to enhance some flavors while blocking your ability to experience others. While I could go on, all I would be doing is repeating much of what I learned watching The Food Network's Alton Brown. He goes in depth for the episode "The ...


19

You could go ahead and add each of the other ingredients (other than the milk) again, doubling the recipe. If you really want to get fussy, you probably should follow the recipe instructions regarding "creaming butter and sugars"...etc. with that second round of ingredients, but honeslty cookies aren't that particular about technique, so I would just dump ...


18

Alkaline solutions are used in different qualities in doughs. I am afraid that you mix something up here, so I don't know which you mean. One use is to enhance the Maillard reaction, which Aaronut already described. This is indeed done with lye. But nobody is incorporating lye into the dough (this would be quite dangerous). Instead, the formed pieces are ...


17

Well, a one-inch diameter sphere has a volume of 1.74 teaspoons, or 0.58 tablespoons. It looks like the numbered sizes are in fractions of a quart, so if you could have any size you wanted, that'd be a a #110 disher. I assume that means you'll probably want a #100, which is 0.64 tablespoons, surely close enough for cookies. (From that same link, it looks ...


16

Take a look at this photo: The feet are the ruffles on the edges.


16

The rest period hydrates the starches in flour, giving the dough a firmer and more workable texture (there is some very minor gluten development, but its mostly the expansion of the starch bundles with water). In many cookies, the flavors will also mature and improve, especially with cocoa in the recipe. In many recipes, the cooling from refrigeration is ...


16

To make cookie dough to eat raw you have a couple of choices: Leave the eggs out Use pasteurized eggs I'm not sure how Ben and Jerry's make theirs, but I suspect it is by pasteurizing at some point in the manufacturing process. Leaving the egg(s) out is the simplest method and doesn't make a big difference in the final product (when you are not going to ...


16

Yes and no. There isn't a point at which they will ever be pure caramel - the flour would alter the texture enough to prevent it from being "pure", not to mention the chocolate would burn before that point. It is possible to have enough sugar in the cookies that it can become caramelized, but this would happen with very flat cookies, in a thin batter, ...


15

During baking, all of the nice "tempered" crystals that come in the chocolate chips are melted out. The chocolate loses its temper, if you will. When the chocolate solidifies again, it does so with different crystals that result in a softer chocolate with a lower melting point.


15

Alton Brown dicusses how to change cookie recipes in the Good Eats episode "Three Chips For Sister Marsha" (S3E6P1) The transcript can be found here: http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season3/Cookie/CookieTranscript.htm From scene 14, we learn that If you: add soda replace 1 egg with milk high ratio white:brown sugar use butter You get: Thin & Crisp ...


15

No. 350F is exactly the same as 176.66...C Follow the recipe in exactly the same way


15

Anecdotally, the difference is in the spread. When tested, this is confirmed, along with it affecting the browning and the texture. When you start with cold dough, the outer edges of the cookie start to firm up before the middle has warmed up a lot. This means it will start crusting (and browning) before the fat in the middle starts to spread out. The ...


15

Thaw in refrigerator until soft enough to portion. Portion total batch, then re-freeze. Ideally, it should have been portioned before initial freeze. At this point, unless you want to bake them all, you will be fine with a refrigerated thaw, portion, and re-freeze. Store portioned, frozen, cookie dough with as little air in the container as possible.


14

The fat in your dough started to soften/melt - especially if you have a hot oven running in the kitchen. Keep your dough cold in the fridge between batches. See this question for more details on the issue in general, but for your situation, keep it cold between batches. You seem to have started correctly, which is good - you just have to keep it going ...


13

One thing to keep in mind is that they are in the "Contains 2% or less" section, which means they are exempt from the "descending order requirement". So all we know is that they are less that 2% of the total weight. I just looked at one typical chocolate chip cookie recipe that gave weights in grams, and it was 8% eggs by weight (114 grams out of 1419). So 2%...


13

You're going to have more issues with cookie-spreading than anything else, because your fat is going to get all warm. If you have a lot of fat in your cookies, you're definitely going to want to put the dough back in the fridge. If the dough is a hard dough, and you don't expect your cookies to significantly change shape during cooking, I wouldn't worry ...


13

You can dip a knife in hot water between each slice you cut. The hot knife will make it easier to cut the dough, without thawing it. You can also do this with an ice cream scoop, but as dough is more dense than ice cream I doubt it will be efficient enough.


12

Baking soda also raises the PH of the product resulting in better browning. Soda can be left out. Many recipes- especially for chewier cookies- don't call for any leavening besides the eggs. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/the-chewy-recipe/index.html Cookie recipes often call for the dough to be chilled so that it spreads less in the oven ...


12

Not only does salt affect the taste of baked goods, it reacts with the dough chemically to slow the action of leaveners, and to change the texture. Here's a brief synopsis, which discusses how salt has an effect on water absorption, as well : http://www.progressivebaker.com/resources/tips_effects_of_salt.shtm


12

Chocolate is in is most essential form made up of cocoa butter and cocoa solids. The chocolate you buy is tempered, the crystals in the cocoa butter are aligned and properly formed, this is what keeps it shiny and gives it a snap. When the chocolate melts, without tempering, in the cookie the crystals in the cocoa butter melt but do not form properly again, ...


11

There are many factors in play such as the type of sugars, amount of eggs or other sources of hydration, amount and type of leavening and so forth, but as an overall generalization: Melting the butter will lead to chewier cookies Creaming colder/room temperature butter with sugar will lead to cookies with a higher, more cake like texture. Refrigerating the ...


11

Freeze them. After they are frozen, put them in the food processor and you should no longer have the issue of them sticking to the blades. As Dougal mentions below, you can also freeze the blade to help keep the temp down.


11

I have no idea how many cookies a 3# tub of dough would make, but I'm so curious! My best suggestion is to thaw out 1 tub, bake all of the cookies and freeze them after they have cooled. I freeze homemade cookies all the time! You can reach in and grab 1 or 2 to nibble on at a time. Most cookies almost seem better (to me) when they are frozen.


11

If you want to use steel-cut oats/oatmeal, you'll probably want to start with a recipe that calls for it. You can substitute old fashioned oats instead of quick-cook oatmeal in most (possibly all) cookie recipes but you can't substitute cooked oatmeal without making major adjustments. In this case, old fashioned oats are specifically called out in the ...


10

Another reason for strong alkalis in cooking is to quickly breaks down the flour gluten, instead of having the dough sit around for a long time to 'soften' it This is used in hand pulled noodles and in cookie dough that is extruded or piped Common bottled cooking Lye water in supermarkets is mostly potassium carbonate and some sodium biphosphate. In powder ...


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