20

Tearing is NOT worth the extra effort, tested experimentally. Others have explored the theoretical reasons behind this, so I decided to test it in real life. I did this like so: Green leaf lettuce from the local CSA Cut one leaf with a sharp knife (stainless), and tore the second leaf carefully by hand (fast, clean tears) Pieces were both wrapped in moist ...


13

I've found stones in dried beans, so it's no myth. Not common, but I'd say I find one every year or two. If you simply swallowed a small stone, it would almost certainly pass without harm, but as TFD pointed out in his comment, biting down on one could be an expensive and painful dental experience. What I do is spread the beans out on a kitchen towel in a ...


9

As a beer brewer, I'm pretty concerned with fizz ;) Since the below may be a little tl;dr, the short answer to your question is, "I don't think so." This is actually the first time I've heard of the metal spoon "trick", so I can't directly comment on that, but I'll share a little of what I know about carbonation. Carbonation is carbon dioxide (CO2) that ...


7

Harold McGee discusses this in On Food And Cooking. From the Preparing Salads section on page 318: If the leaves need to be be divided into smaller pieces, this should be done with the least possible physical pressure, which can crush cells and initiate the development of off-flavours and darkened patches. Cutting with a sharp knife is generally the most ...


7

If the food is spoiled, no, it's still unsafe, because cooking may not destroy toxins that have built up over time. Botulism is a particularly nasty one that will not be destroyed without pressure cooking, and can really, really mess you up. ... but in the case of canned goods, if the cans are still intact (no punctures, rust, etc), and the canning process ...


6

Here's the deal ... if your pan is seasoned correctly using an oil with a high iodine value, then no, soap won't harm it. If it's not seasoned correctly, then it could need a strip & reseason. If you're using a low iodine oil (the surface will be slightly tacky when the pan is cool), then it also might ablate the surface somewhat, and repeated ...


6

It is not the brand. What you are seeing is just a bit of polymerisation, this occurs normally with thin layers of oil exposed to the air for a long time (on the bottle) and especially to a combination of air and heat (on the burner). All oils polymerise to some degree. But if you buy a oil designed specifically for very high heat applications, you will ...


6

The browning of Lettuce leaves are due to the reaction of polyphenol(a chemical in any fruit or vegetable) and enzymes. This is due to two main causes: Aging Cell damage (i.e. from cutting, tearing) Every cell has separate chambers for these two, if they somehow leak, and get mixed up, this would cause browning. Cutting and tearing cause damage to the ...


6

The only difference between a bamboo steamer and a metal/plastic steamer is that a bamboo steamer will absorb (some of the) moisture from the steam, rather than allowing it to recondense and drop into the food. It's possible that recondensed moisture could take a small amount of water-soluble nutrients with it, but between the limited ability of bamboo to ...


6

French fries are often double-fried: They are par-fried at a low temperature, to cook all the way through, after which they are often frozen They are finish-fried at a higher temperature to crisp up and be hot for presentation The type of potato matters--high starch like Idahos are ideal. Here is a link to a Serious Eats article by Kenji Alt describing ...


5

Tearing lettuce is worth the effort It takes a reasonably similar amount of time as cutting, and a different but comparable amount of work. If you are planning on eating the salad soon, all the above comments apply as to the browning effect. However, browning isn't the only consideration when deciding between cutting and tearing. Texture is as essential ...


5

In my experience lettuce will brown faster if cut instead of torn. However as most people are consuming the lettuce within the day, cutting won't make much of a difference if you plan on serving within the hour. It will generally show up the next morning. Iceberg and Romaine are the two lettuce types that come to mind as being nasty for browning. Also ...


5

It causes the pepper to steam a bit, making it easier to remove the charred skin. (resting might also be a factor ... I've never done a side-by-side comparison of covered vs. uncovered)


4

ANY amount of water on the jar or the ingredients does result in the formation of whitish fungus at the affected spot. This will later turn black and the pickle will sour giving off a fermented smell. The only exception is if that spot is well immersed in oil- but no guarantee it is off! The "water" in the fruit, being juice, fights formation of fungus and ...


4

According to the World Health Organization, it is technically possible to catch certain diseases by handling raw meat with cut or abraded skin. However, that example was a pig disease only occurring in a specific region. I could find no references to similar disease transmission from chicken, and you definitely won't get food poisoning, which relies on long ...


3

Ok, here we go....my mom was a total tyrant when it came to cooking rice properly. Yes, she is Japanese. Yes, from Japan. And yes, I'm one of those people who freak out when people lift the lid when it's cooking. Here is how it was explained to me. I have subsequently tested the theory and found hard, empirical evidence on why lifting the lid is BAD. I ...


3

My own experience confirms the answers from the related question from Skeptics. If you hang a spoon inside an open bottle, the fizz goes out. However, I've been able to keep the fizz in the bottle for a couple of days by putting cling film over the top.


2

The keeping qualities will be dependent on the combination of the salt/acidity of the product (preventing growth of some micro-organism) and the heat treatment that it and the packaging receives (removal of others). However it is possible that if there is a small quantity of water introduced in a particular area of the product or packaging - for example ...


2

This sounds like an old wives' tale to me. The only basis I can think of for it is that a certain amount of not-especially-clean water, especially fermenting in a hot region, would promote undesirable fungal growth before the juice from the fruit has a chance to form an inhibiting brine with the salt (the acid also, of course, has anti-microbial possiblities)...


1

After looking that margarine up: It is advertised as a margarine made of mostly unsatured fats. An ingredient list is not readily found on their website (red flag ;) ) . They also claim to not hydrogenate their fats, so to make a solid margarine you are either looking at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interesterified_fat (will behave similar to butter when ...


1

The pepper will sweat and soften the skin, making it easier to remove. I am a qualified cook but i still think the best way to make pimento is to deep fry the capsicum as the skin burns v before the flesh over cooks, making for firmer and fresher tasting pimento. That means you have more opportunity to cook it further in another dish before it turns ...


1

McDonalds (and other companies) fries are shot through a screen using a water cannon and go straight into hot oil where they are fried, before being frozen. They are then shipped frozen to the stores where they are then fried in oil again before being served, so they are twice-fried. More than the method of frying though is the variety or potato you use. ...


1

No, it's not true. Bamboo steamers have no special qualities as opposed to regular steamers. Steaming some food as opposed to boiling preserves some nutrients, how you steam won't make a difference as long as your equipment and process are up to the job.


1

Safety, from the perspective of this site, is short term. Will you get acutely ill if you eat something, within about 2 days? From this perspective, there is absolutely no safety issue with mixing fats of vegetable and animal origin. Frying a steak in vegetable oil, or sauteeing vegetables in bacon fat is perfectly safe.


1

In Mexico I get stones all the time. Thankfully they are normally not as hard my teeth so I havn't broken a tooth yet. I havn't had this occur in Canada only when buying them in Mexico. Almost every pack has atleast one if not more. Flor de Maya was the most recent one I got stones in. I think it is more common in Mexico.


1

To the extent that tearing lettuce leaves more cells intact, if a salad is going to be served immediately, cutting is much better. The flavor of lettuce is in the juice, and cutting exposes the juices to the palate. There is nothing better that the sweet crunch of a rib of cut romaine lettuce. Torn lettuce tastes like paper by comparison.


1

I think the biggest issue, what they're warning you against when they say not to cut, has to do with removing leaves if you're using less than a whole lettuce. If you slice up the lettuce head as though it was an eggplant, you will leave behind a flat plane of cut lettuce walls which will be nasty and brown the next time you make a salad. If you pull off ...


1

Today I ate soup and it had a bay leaf in it. It got stuck in my throat and I couldn't breathe or talk. Lucky my 12 yr old daughter had the sense to ring the ambulance, I believe I have a guardian angel. I barely managed to pull it out. I was told to sip water and eat soft foods only, my esophagus is cut all over and my throat is really sore to swallow. All ...


1

I am surprised seeing this too. It has been eons since my Dad used to tell me a lot of about NOT using ginger on pork, but garlic on both is not bad. It's all about ginger and pork having a chemical reaction that is bad on the aspect of the yin/yang balance in the body as my dad explained it. It releases a certain chemical as well that when your immunity ...


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