73

Microwave doors don't have an airtight seal; the window between the electronics and the cooking compartment is also not airtight, and the electronics are cooled by a fan. It would be surprising if some cooking smells didn't escape. In practice, every microwave I've ever had allows me to smell the cooking, from the very cheapest to some rather fancy ones with ...


43

Because it is more efficient when running the kitchen while in full service. It takes less time to remove their hands from the towels than it would take to remove gloves. This also applies to chefs in other kind of cuisines; if you look at french cooks, they will do the same thing; grab a towel to pick something from the oven, or pick a pan from the stove.


27

According to Still Tasty, a site that utilizes FDA, CDC and USDA data, cooked pasta should be fine for 3-5 days in the refrigerator. Use a shallow container or a Ziplock bag to store the pasta, and get it in the fridge within 2 hours of cooking. To keep it from sticking, toss it with a bit of oil. You can reheat it or eat it cold. You can freeze pasta ...


24

We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon. This is incorrect. Teflon (PTFE) itself is one of the most non-reactive substances you can use on cookware, in some ways better than ceramic. To quote Wikipedia: It is nonreactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and ...


23

It's doubtful the plastic vaporized. It probably just made a hole because it melted and stretched. I'm sure your oven is safe. Any tiny amount of plastic that might have melted and landed on a surface (which is doubtful) would burn and you will smell the burnt plastic. Next time you use your oven just preheat it to 500 for 30 minutes and if there is no smell ...


14

If the egg actually exploded as in the title, then no, that egg is probably highly contaminated. Not only is it bad, but nothing its contents have touched can be considered safe to use and should be discarded. I assume however that you actually have an egg that was broken in handling. In that case, only the broken egg is a loss. Other answers and ...


12

It's totally normal to smell the food in a microwave as they aren't meant to be sealed. Microwaves have fans to circulate the air and keep the electronics cool, so they will circulate aromas.


11

I don't know where your information came from about "We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon", but it is incorrect. Teflon is the least chemically reactive material you are likely to encounter in daily life. There probably are a few substances that can react with it, but if you have a way of sourcing these, you hopefully won't be ...


10

If the pan has been always used in the kitchen and for cooking, then is absolutely safe. The phenomenon you observe is due to thin film interference. Is the same iridescence that we observe on soap bubbles or where a thin film of a greasy matter spread on a water surface. In the pan case, the thin film causing the interference and the related coloured ...


9

One element missing from other answers is how microwave ovens keep the waves inside. They use a Faraday cage https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage . The size of the holes you can have in those cages is related to the wave's frequency. In the case of microwaves, millimeters-sized holes are ok. That allows the presence of a vent to let pressure, water ...


8

Edit after the question was substantially changed. This answer wasn't initially concerned with the fate of the broken egg itself, but the others around it. If the white 'exploded' bin it. If it 'leaked' then that egg is compromised. If you broke it, eat it today. If you don't know when it was broken, discard & treat the rest of this answer as it stood ...


7

Your wife probably thinks "It's just water and thoroughly boiled, so all is well.". Unfortunately, it is not. If you look into your pot after the first use, you'll notice that the water contains traces of the vegetable, meaning it technically falls under the "food that becomes unsafe after 2/4 hours at 40-140 °F (4-60 °C)" category and should be ...


6

This layer just means some milk proteins have cooked onto the bottom of the pan, and says nothing at all about the age or condition of the milk. It's more likely when you boil a smaller quantity due to the more rapid heating. During can help avoid this. However repeated heating and cooling isn't generally a good idea. With milk you can get away with it but ...


6

I, and in general we, cannot answer if something is safe. There are instances where we can say something is clearly unsafe, but when dealing with things like is this piece of metal safe for cooking we are not equipped to give anything but anecdotal answers and partially informed opinions. The only safety answer that is actually reliable would come from ...


5

Sure. Wash them off with a little cold water, rub them dry carefully with some paper towels in case you want to keep them for longer and not have sticky old egg whites on the outside.


4

To determine whether the oven is safe, you should look into the material your plastic wrap is made of, with the most common alternatives being: PVC LDPE PVDC For all of those, we're concerned with melting temperature and thermal degradation: it will have a drop risk only above the former, and a VOC (Volatile Organic Compound, which are the awfully ...


4

Hygiene issues: The inside of the glove gets dirty pretty fast so basically you have to wash you hands after every use of the glove. They're much harder to clean then a towel.


4

Yah aluminum foil is considered a bad thing on grills, from what I have heard. They sell grill grates for such things if you like, me, I just turn the flame on the grill down a touch and deal with the occasional flame-ups. They actually do no harm. And if you have a grill brush to apply the marinade while cooking with a l o n g handle (what I use) you can ...


4

In a hot pan, the oil droplets jump off for three reasons usually: When you add oil to a hot pan that is not completely dry yet (i.e some water present in the pan). This residue water will boil, turn into steam and splatter oil. When you are adding wet food to the hot oil. The water turns into steam and splatters oil. Solution: Making sure the food is ...


3

Induction cookers utilize electromagnetic induction to heat the pots on them rather than the plate itself. Induction cooking works by creating a magnetic field that is constantly oscillated (north and south pole are switched). This causes an electric current to run in the bottom of the pot and heat it up via resistive heating. Since the current literally ...


3

I mostly agree with moscafj's answer, but I do think that it needs to be qualified since we don't know what sort of plastic packaging the chicken is in. A lot of vacuum packaging for food is perfectly safe to put in warm or even mildly hot water, but some types of plastics will begin to degrade if heated too much. Most food-grade plastics aren't going to ...


3

You can use aluminum foil on your grill. I do all the time. It is really hard to cook bacon without it, or white fish that will flake out and fall thru. Maybe if you line the whole grill with foil you could damage it with its own heat. But foil is fine for food. That said, you don't need the foil. Cook it on the grate as usual. A fatty steak can ...


3

A glass casserole dish, with a casserole in it, will be safe at any temperature your oven can reach. As Ring mentioned, the issue is not absolute temperature, but fast changes in temperature, leading to a temperature differential and thermal stresses inside the dish. Your oven cannot heat the dish fast enough to cause a problem, and the wet food inside will ...


2

According to this page The Pyrex heat capacity is truly impressive as the glass can withstand temperatures up to 932 degrees Fahrenheit or 500°C Beware, however Pyrex will tolerate both hot and cold, but it can't do both at the same time. Pyrex can go from the freezer or fridge to the oven, but the trip needs to be a long one. Sudden changes in ...


2

Another factor is that decent gloves allowing some fine-motor skills as well as easy putting on and off have to fit well, and not everyone has the same size hands. So every chef has to carry their own pair of gloves, or every station has to have a set (colour-coded perhaps). Even then they're slow to put on and take off, and quite likely to end up getting ...


2

Try granite. I have used water-smoothed granite cobbles (~ 1 kilo) as key ingredients for making 'stone soup' (AKA Minestrone ala Lithos) with no ill effect to myself, family or guests. However, this use keeps the stone's temperature low, geologically speaking. Granite is used for countertops; most types have little I worry about, but your milage may vary....


2

For hot rock cooking, you want four properties of the stone: A smooth, non-porous surface. This is almost (ok, at least a bit) like a non-stick surface and means you can clean it afterwards. Neither food nor detergent should "seep into" the stone. High thermal mass. You want to make sure that your stone is not significantly cooled down by your food as this ...


2

If you've spent enough time on youtube you will see induction cookers on wood, usually cutting boards or butcher blocks, a lot of the time. In general I would say this is safe, but as Telsujin says, "check the manual" for safety guidance. I would guess that wood, non-metallic, base is recommended. There could be a small chance that the induction could ...


2

I think this is the inside of a non-stick pan, on the side near where the handle is riveted (scratched rivet at the right of the picture). It doesn't look like it's peeling from the scratches. So the amount of coating getting into the food would be miniscule. Even the if it did peel, the result would be more unpleasant than dangerous (paper on the use of ...


2

No, this is a feature primarily of beef, some wild game, and poultry. Meats like pork and many kinds of fish may contain parasites and thus need to be cooked to higher temperatures than eg beef or duck (pork) or frozen before cooking (many kinds of fish) to minimise the risk of illness.


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