24

There is a slight carry over with most things you cook. However I think the answer to most "Why is my stir fry not like the restaurant's?" questions, has to do with heat. Their stoves are much, much more powerful. You simply can't get that with a typical home stove. So, the way to get closest at home is to preheat your wok (or your largest flat, not non ...


23

It's par-cooking the pasta, cooling it down (typically an ice water bath), so that when a customer orders, they can significantly reduce the time needed to get the dish prepared for them. Yes Boiling the pasta does two things -- hydrate the pasta, and cook the starch. The hydrating continues while the pasta is resting. (you can also soak pasta ahead of ...


21

Oil or fat is absolutely not necessary to cook rice. I suspect you may have been taught the pilaf method where the rice is first sauteed in oil or butter, and then liquid is added and the rice is fully cooked. The purpose of the pilaf method is to add depth of flavor. When making pilafs, additional herbs, spices, or aromatics (such as onions) are often ...


21

The proteins in egg white and egg yolk behave differently at different temperatures. It is an ingredient that responds to very subtle temperature variations. That is why it is a favorite item to cook for those of us interested in low-temperature cooking using an immersion circulator (sous vide). However, predating the immersion circulator, the Japanese ...


20

Pull them out on time. Cool them rapidly in an ice bath. The rapid cooling is for food safety reasons rather than any affect on the cooking. Reheat them for cooking however you were going to finish them originally. I wouldn't leave them cooking for 48 hours. I think you run the risk of affecting the texture of the meat negatively. If you're planning on ...


19

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


18

Trying to predict when a roast is done based on time is a very poor method. Many factors can change how long a particular roast takes to cook to your preference, including: Size and shape of the roast--generally the thickest dimension primarily affects how long it takes Initial temperature of the roast What temperature you cook it at The doneness you are ...


18

It will be safe and edible. It might not be quite as good. Part of the appeal of slow cookers is just the convenience of leaving them unattended. The other appeal is low-slow cooking that blends flavors and melts connective tissue without burning anything. Meat Cooking things faster and hotter will not make the meat as tender as it would be- but it will ...


17

Par-boiling the noodles at home would allow you to finish cooking them with just hot water. I would boil your chosen noodles 2 minutes under the package recommended time. Then rinse and chill the noodles and toss with a bit of oil and chill it. Take this to work in an insulated bag with an ice pack. A "saucy" noodle dish would be simpler to prepare at the ...


17

If you want to reduce total preparation time, you can skip the soak. Then you can just boil for about 4-6 hours, instead of soaking overnight. This is not a tradeoff most cooks are willing to make, since it wastes quite a bit of energy, and reduces the taste qualities of the prepared beans somewhat. If you want it even faster, as weets mentioned, pressure ...


13

It is true that there is a negative correlation between cooking time and temperature: the higher the temperature, the shorter the cooking time. But it is highly non-linear. Even if you were to account for the fact that temperature is measured on a ratio, not interval scale where the real zero is at 0 Kelvin, it will still not help you at all. Internal ...


13

Calamari or squid is of course famous for being difficult to cook, because it gets tough or rubbery. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking, octopus and squid meat are very rich in collagen: They are chewy when lightly cooked, tough when cooked to the denaturing temperatures of their collagen, around 120 - 130 F / 50 - 55 C, and become ...


13

My guess of what happened was that the potatoes were sitting in an open pot that was not in a rolling boil. I'm going to assume that they went down from the pass and the place where "they took up [their] quarters" was at 11,000ft. This region was then, as it is today, almost destitute of vegetation. Darwin notes in the paragraph just before the ...


12

You shouldn't cook more than a few minutes, and should cool them as quickly as possible afterwards. Ideally, you'll be blanching them, and here's how: Bring a pot of water with a pinch of salt in it to a roiling boil Dump beans in, and cook for a few minutes Check that beans are fully cooked (time will vary by variety and ripeness of beans) Strain beans, ...


12

Agreed, scaling up sauces that require reduction can be tricky, but it actually reduces to a simple physics problem. First I'm going to give you the best solution and then the science behind it. The solution is to use a larger, shallower pan and apply higher heat, while stirring more frequently. I usually go a quarter step up in heat on the stove; so, ...


12

Temperature is the only foolproof way to determine doneness. Unfortunately it's not very practical to carry a thermometer over to your friend's house for brunch. There are other indicators, of course, and you have mentioned the good ones for eggs. I will add, however, that some indicators can be deceiving. For example, eggs releasing a pool of liquid is ...


11

You can try to bake both at the lower temperature, and it might turn out OK, but there are a lot of variables that could cause it not to. I went into some of the effects of time and temperature in this answer. In a nutshell, you have two major processes happening when you bake dough; the first is the Maillard reaction (browning) and the second is water ...


11

The answers that exist are incomplete, somewhat misleading, or too specific. The amount of time that you will need to bake items depends mostly on the following factors: Major factors The shape of the item, especially its thinnest dimension (usually height for a cake or casserole) The temperature of the oven Minor factors The air circulation pattern ...


11

Try heating a couple table spoons of butter with some flour in a pot for a couple of minutes stirring with a wooden spoon then add enough hot milk to make the mixture smooth. Melting the grated cheese in flour prevents the oils from separating and the proteins from curdling. (edit) If you want to search for a recipe, a Béchamel sauce with grated cheese ...


11

Some info for completeness sake: The method you have been taught is fine. The oil, lard or fat is there to prevent: Only the bottom layer was burnt only a bit. the fat at the bottom is there to allow higher temperature from the bottom to generate steam without burning the bottom layer and the oil does that. Making rice well is not easy so don't be ...


11

It is a scalable recipe. First, you decide in which pan you want to bake the cake. You take your pan and measure it. Let's say you have a 9" round pan. You go into the column "lbs per round" and find out that your pan takes 3 1/2 lbs of batter. Then you go to the other table with ingredients measurements, multiply the column "6 lbs" by 7/12, and have your ...


10

What would "ideal" mean? Most items that you can roast in 2-3 hours can also be thrown in the slow cooker for 10-12 hours. It depends entirely on how the dish is prepared, how much fat/water you're using, whether or not you incorporate steam or convection, and more. Anyway, if there were such an algorithm, it would be highly inadvisable to try using it at ...


10

You probably want to just use already-cooked beans, from a can. (Hope there's a store nearby.) Then you just have to cook as long as it takes to let the flavors mingle; half an hour is plenty. If you happen to have a pressure cooker, you can cook dried beans much faster, something like 20-30 minutes. See for example this recipe - you can add back in ...


10

Smaller breads are usually called rolls or sometimes buns. There are also a lot of names for specific kinds of rolls, beyond obvious things like "sourdough rolls". You can certainly take an existing recipe and just form in to more, smaller pieces, and reducing baking time. They'll look funny if you just cut it into pieces, though; you should reform them ...


10

Brownies are bar cookies. Note that the brownies are at the edge of the pan are more cooked, and raised higher: they set before they settle back down. Baking the brownies in a mini-muffin tin will essentially make each mini-brownie all edge. They will rise and set very rapidly, and then easily over bake. I would suggest that brownies are not ideal in a ...


10

There is no single answer to that question: it is going to vary program by program. Some shows, like America's Test Kitchen, are going to be quite precise--at at least, they will intend to be. Other shows, not naming any names, less so. The thing is, with very very few exceptions, you should not be cooking to time anyway. The time in a recipe is just a ...


9

I don't know the whole algorithm, but I found the formula you'd need to derive it. First, as you said, you would need a reference for the final internal temperature of the meat. McGee On Food And Cooking is a good source, I don't know of any online accessible ones, although they probably exist. Second, you have to calculate the time needed to reach that ...


9

I like to follow Alton Brown's approach: steam for 12 minutes, drop into ice bath. Always turns out perfectly for me this way (and as a bonus, they're much easier to peel than boiled eggs). Here's the video from Alton's show, with some extra information in it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUHKpHek2E8 And while unrelated (since you want to steam them), if ...


8

Some of you folks are just worry warts. Cook's Country / Cook's Illustrated has a very similar recipe called "French Chicken In A Pot" (but one that is much easier to do than Gary's). Cooking at 225-250 F (~ 110-120C) for 4-5 hours makes this the most awesome chicken my family has ever had. The first time I did it, I did probe breast and thigh to be sure ...


8

Cooking temperature and time are determined by a number of factors. The idea is to get the inside of the product properly cooked before the outside dries out, becomes tough, or becomes unpleasantly dark or even burned. At the same time, you usually want the product to get nicely browned (adds flavor and looks nice) before the inside is overcooked. So it's a ...


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