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2

I would caution that it very much depends on your oven and how it pre-heats. My oven heats up by turning the bottom heating elements on at full blast, so if I put something in the oven while it's doing that it essentially broils it from the bottom. I typically bake potatoes directly on the oven rack, so that would definitely burn the bottom of the potatoes ...


2

I had the same problem and cut the potatoes in half making them as thin as possible. The heat has less distance to travel so the potatoes will cook faster. I spread a cookie sheet with olive oil, added salt and coarse ground pepper, and put the potatoes on the sheet cut side down. The large potatoes I buy as loose potatoes are done in 45 minutes at 425F ...


3

Two reasons for preheating an oven are: Makes cooking times more predictable because different ovens heat up at different rates; all other things being equal, a given dish will take the same amount of time to cook regardless of what oven it's placed in, assuming the oven is already holding at the specified temperature (bearing in mind that ovens do vary in ...


9

Here's a hack: You can microwave your potato before baking it (like suggested in this great answer). From The Spruce Eats: The only problem is they take an hour to cook, which requires planning ahead. If you're trying to get dinner on the table in a hurry, there is actually a method you can employ: Use the microwave to speed up the cooking process, cutting ...


31

In the UK, we call these 'jacket potatoes'1. As already mentioned, putting them in a cold oven as it heats might win you five minutes, but not much more. It's very slightly more efficient overall than waiting for the oven to be hot then opening the door. Two additional methods of speeding up jacket potatoes. Put a metal skewer through the longest centre, ...


18

You can put the potatoes in the oven while it's heating, and that's not going to make any overall difference in how long it takes the oven to get hot. Opening the door to put the potatoes inside causes more heat loss than the mass of the potatoes possibly could. And then you still have to heat up those potatoes. However, based on some personal experiments, ...


1

Building on GdD's suggestion that a custard might be too wet for the meringue, how about using a white chocolate ganache instead? You can make it at least reminiscent of custard by adding vanilla bean seeds. And if you make a ganache with egg yolks, you'll get some of the egg-y taste of custard.


4

I think your flavor ideas seem fine, I'd advise against a custard filling for two reasons. First, custard is squishy, even if you make it harder it's going to squish out when the macaron is bitten into, which isn't the result you want. Second, the excess moisture in the custard could make the macarons soggy, also not the result you want. Almost all the ...


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