Hot answers tagged

11

IMO, in a professional/commercial kitchen you should never re-use and always use clean equipment. The risk of contamination is great(er) in case of chicken, so is the risk of having an inspector coming in and seeing dirty equipment lying around.


7

Rather than worrying about whether you 'stir down' the starter before measuring by volume, you should really be measuring by weight. Kitchen scales are cheap and incredibly helpful, especially for any kind of baking. Regarding feeding: there are almost as many different feeding ratios as there are sourdough starters. None of these are set in stone. A common ...


6

It is unlikely that the burned residue from eggs warrants either tossing the pan or the stove. In fact, depending on what the pan is made of, you could likely clean it and continue to use it and the likely worse thing that would happen would be the next thing you cook in the pan might have a burned flavor. If stoves had to be thrown away every time ...


5

In terms of food safety, once a piece of equipment touches a piece of food, the equipment is that piece of food until it's been properly cleaned. If you put a piece of raw chicken in a pan, then take it out and wait several hours, that pan is still chicken that's been unrefrigerated longer than it should've been.


5

In general you can't convert volume measures (like cups) into mass measures (like ounces) without taking into account the specific thing you're measuring, because different substances will have different densities in a cup. If you search online you can find conversions for different common food items but these vary. The website CookItSimply provides a ...


4

If you mean metallic titanium - very unlikely. If you mean titanium compounds like the oxides - it is very likely. Titanium oxides are used in nearly all modern paints. I expect a fused ceramic coating is equally likely to contain titanium compounds. The people that write the info on the products are liberal arts majors and would not know titanium if it bit ...


4

From the linked question on pasta absorption, When cooking pasta in salted water how much of the salt is absorbed?, which basically says "the more salt you put in, the more will be absorbed". However, one thing I've always thought to be true is that if you don't put enough in when cooking, you seem to have to add a whole lot more afterwards to lift the ...


4

The conservation issue aside: It depends heavily on what fruits you want to use. Fruits that contain a lot of fiber might not need any thickening agent to get a good, spreadable consistency. This includes for example certain variants of apples or pears, but also things like plums if you don't discard the skins. The consistency may be a bit different from ...


4

I found some publications about the decomposition of Bisphenols A and E in high-temperature water (BPA: https://doi.org/10.1039/B313509H, BPE: https://doi.org/10.1021/ie060888l). But "high temperature" in their context means 250°C - 300°C (at correspondingly high pressures), while at lower temperatures the reaction rate was practically zero. Since the ...


4

From the way that picture looks, this is a sandwich-bottom pan with some thin kind of coating on the bottom. That coating seems to have come off. In that case, there is nothing you can do to make it look the way it did before. If I were you, I would just continue to use the pan as-is. No need to throw it away, as it will still work, and no need to try to ...


3

An induction pan must be flat to work properly, if it is bowed up in the middle even if it does work you aren't going to have the right efficiency. Many pans say induction ready, some say it because they are made of steel or iron, but not all of them have been tested so you won't always know before you try it.


3

Traditional duck confit is made with duck fat, which would be a solid when cold. That will not work so well. So, the cured duck is placed in a crock, and warm duck fat is added to cover. This is then placed in the oven at a low temperature. After the cooking, the duck is left submerged to cool, and be stored in the fat. There is no splatter risk, because ...


3

You should use it as the sugar the recipe calls for. In this case, whip it with the eggs and oil. The vanilla in vanilla sugar is for flavoring and does not really alter the sugar.


3

Well, if you're trying to minimize sugar overall, really the only substitute is low-sugar pectin. You can use grape sugar, or high fructose corn syrup, or other non-sugarcane-derived sugars, but unless you use low-sugar pectin you have to use some kind of sugar or the jam won't thicken properly.


3

Seems there is no need to cook rice with salt, at least in my country or my friends who love the culinary. But if you really need some salty flavor in your rice, maybe you could: Turn your rice into fried rice, seasoning in the end. Make some yummy sauces and add onto your rice. Dissolve salt in water to become a salty solution, spray it on your rice ...


3

Black rice is "hulled", meaning the fibrous outer husk is removed, but not (or only minimally) "polished", meaning the thin but tough bran layer is left on. (It's the bran that provides the color to black rice.) Different varietals of rice, and different processing methods, will lead to a thicker or thinner layer of bran. It sounds like ...


2

As with all internet information, take this article with healthy skepticism, but it gives a summary: https://healthy-cookware.com/what-is-titanium-cookware-really-made-of/ To cherry pick, Titanium is used particularly in some current non-stick applications because it is strong, very strong, light, readily available (titanium is a fairly common element ...


2

Try it & see ;) Aleppo isn't particularly hot; I haven't checked it on the Scoville scale, but just from experience, though it's got a little kick to it, & that kick can be quite variable depending on your source of the pepper, to me, aleppo is used for its flavour rather than its kick. Cayenne, on the other hand, I always consider to be "free heat"...


2

2 probable causes you did not put enough chili powder. the chili powder is stale. Some chili powder are not "spicy hot", taste some before adding it to your curry.


2

The fan isn't for frying only: it helps to regulate the heat more consistently and hastens the cooking/baking process. Turning off the fan doesn't turn off the element, however, so it will only slow down the baking process. If the instructions indicate that you turn the fan off, it could be because the item you're baking should bake at a very slow rate. This,...


2

Is it a steel pan ? Test with a magnet. (I think my cheap induction hob came with a cheap magnet thingy to test my pans) "Cast iron, enameled cast iron, and many types of stainless-steel cookware are all induction compatible. There are exceptions, though. For instance, All-Clad's MC2 line, which is made of aluminum and stainless steel, is not induction ...


2

It sounds to me like a curry with beans, not a chilli with curry powder. Apart from splashing in soggy nan at the end, which I don't think is going to work, it sounds like it would make a decent aromatic curry. You don't mention quantities, but I'd go heavy on the onion & hold the stock back to give the end result a 'firmer' gravy, which would mean you ...


2

Assuming that you ask about the dry product that usually consists of mostly sugar plus vanillin (or if really posh, genuine vanilla), the recommendation is to treat it like sugar and add it together with the other sugar in the recipe. The total amount is small(ish), so unless you are making something very sensitive and finicky, adding it to the flour won’t ...


2

A couple of the largest clues to help you If it's Spanish, it's probably OK 'raw', if it's Mexican, probably not. If it's soft & squashy, it needs cooking, if it's firm & wrinkled it's OK as it is. Left is cured & ready to eat, right must be cooked first. I'm ignoring the fact that for this photo someone has cross-contaminated, making the ...


2

Yes, there is a better way! The problem is we want attributes of both cooking methods; particularly, we want the biscuit to be moist yet with a crispy crust. The solution, then, is to combine methods! I found that two rolls can be prepared quite nicely with the following procedure: Microwave on high (1100 watt microwave) for 45 seconds, slightly less ...


2

This probably isn't safe, and there's no reason to do it in the first place The purpose of sous vide cooking is to get your food to a very specific and even temperature throughout, in order to guarantee a certain degree of doneness and minimise the possibility of overcooking. It achieves this by holding the food in a water bath at that appropriate ...


1

Egg wash is an answer. Source: http://www.dutchovendave.com/breadbasics.html [For a shiny crust, brush the top of the bread with an equal solution of whole egg, water and milk. If desired, sprinkle with poppy, caraway or sesame seed or rolled oats.

For a softer, deep golden brown crust, brush with softened butter or margarine.

For a crisp crust, brush ...


1

A sauteuse pan is a very versatile pan. If you have no lid, it's a great pan for sautéing and browning. With a thin layer of oil you can cook vegetables, scallops, latkes, etc. If you have lids that fit you can braise in these. You can also use to cook pasta, stews, etc. Copper is good conductor, so these should heat evenly. I also sometimes use a pan like ...


1

I am a bit surprised by your description of the error state - all induction stoves start and stop heating all the time, beyond the 50 Hertz cycle of the electricity they also use time modulation on a more noticeable frequency to control their energy output. But you speak as if you have had been using the stove for a while, so it must be different from the ...


1

All Clad is a highly respected company and their products are well-made. If I was in your shoes, I'd contact their customer service and provide that picture to see if there is anything they can do to either repair or replace. The worst that could happen is for them to say "no", but you never know...they might do something for you! Worth the effort!


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