35 votes
Accepted

Are these pots suitable to cook in?

These are enamelled pots - perfectly fine and intended for cooking, albeit a bit sensitive to chipping if not handled carefully. You can find various listings of that exact set on the Internet, e.g ...
Stephie's user avatar
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34 votes
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What are the advantages of seasoned cast iron vs enameled cast iron?

Enameled and seasoned cast-iron cookware share a number of properties; they're very heavy, not terribly conductive of heat (leading to hot-spots when over a high flame), and capable of storing an ...
Blargant's user avatar
  • 2,462
32 votes
Accepted

What is this type of cookware called used for roasting and baking?

To me, that's a Dutch (*) oven. You could also call it a "heavy braising pot." Often, they are enameled, so you could call it "enameled pot" also. In general, a dish doesn't have a ...
Kate Gregory's user avatar
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24 votes
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Best way to deal with drying dishware to minimize hazards?

The only important part here is to not seal water in the container. You can either let it air dry, or use a clean cloth to dry it. If you have a problem with your dishes and glasses having a white ...
Joe's user avatar
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23 votes

What is this type of cookware called used for roasting and baking?

I call mine a cast iron casserole dish. And google agrees with me in the uk. lecreuset in their uk shop calls them casseroles. https://www.lecreuset.co.uk/en_GB/c/cooking-and-baking/cooking/casseroles
WendyG's user avatar
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22 votes
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Is a borosilicate glass pot safe to use on a gas burner stovetop?

I specifically would like to know if anyone has used a (verified) borosilicate glass pot on a gas burner stove top I have used borosilicate glass vessels on a number of different heat sources, both ...
Athanasius's user avatar
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21 votes
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Can I use this Ikea glassware on stove top?

No, you can't. You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this ...
Cascabel's user avatar
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19 votes

Can I utilise a baking stone to make crepes?

I think it's a bad idea... Crepes are made with a batter (as opposed to a dough) spread thin over a hot metal plate (seasoned or oiled). A baking stone has a porous surface and I suppose the batter ...
Luciano's user avatar
  • 4,846
19 votes

Why does Marco Pierre White use a spatula instead of a Soup Ladle?

I'd use a wooden spatula rather than one of those over-flexible plastic ones, but… a soup ladle is for serving soup. It's completely the wrong implement for making it. You can't stir properly, making ...
Tetsujin's user avatar
  • 30k
17 votes

Can I utilise a baking stone to make crepes?

No, don't do it. Good crepes are made within narrow parameters of heat exchange. You can observe this when making crepes on the stovetop - the first crepe is almost always bad. The pan seems to be ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
17 votes

What is this type of cookware called used for roasting and baking?

A "casserole". From Cambridge dictionary (my emphasis): a dish made by cooking meat, vegetables, or other foods in liquid inside a heavy container at low heat, or the heavy, deep container ...
James K's user avatar
  • 1,250
16 votes
Accepted

Is it dangerous to stack stainless steel cookware?

If the inside of your pans has some kind of non-stick coating (for example containing PTFE), it's advisable to avoid scratches. There are pans with no coating, like many cast iron pans or uncoated ...
MrBlueCharon's user avatar
13 votes

Do stainless steel sauce pots wear out and how can I tell if it needs replacement?

I have a couple of those of the same vintage that are just fine. Sometimes the copper coating on the bottom wears away but these are generally long lasting quality cookware. Not sure about your ...
Steve Chambers's user avatar
11 votes

Is it safe to cook in discolored stainless steel pots?

If the pan has been always used in the kitchen and for cooking, then is absolutely safe. The phenomenon you observe is due to thin film interference. Is the same iridescence that we observe on soap ...
Alchimista's user avatar
11 votes

Black spotting/dust in stainless steel utensils.Is this mildew?

The specks are corrosion pits. Austenitic stainless (aka- 18-8 , 304 , and several other numbers) are notorious for pitting in salt (halides). The 316 and 317 with molybdenum are more resistant but I ...
blacksmith37's user avatar
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10 votes
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What differences will happen if you use a rectangular baker to bake cookies instead of a tray?

They should be fine. It's possible that they'll be a bit gooey, or just a touch underdone. The high sides of the pan may shield the cookies from the heat, just a little bit. The glass pans will ...
Megha's user avatar
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10 votes

Why avoid olive oil in Gotham Steel pans?

The instructions aren't telling you that there's something about their pans that makes them especially incompatible with butter or olive oil. They're saying that, since they are made to be non-stick ...
PoloHoleSet's user avatar
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9 votes
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What's happening to the coating on the OUTSIDE of my roommate's non-stick cookware as we wash it?

Are you SURE they were advertised as dishwasher safe? If so, contact the manufacturer because they were lying. It is, in fact, the bare metal you're looking at— those pans are made from aluminum which ...
ChefAndy's user avatar
  • 3,063
9 votes

Is using a frying pan to boil water for pasta a good or a bad idea?

If you're making a small enough quantity of pasta for it to totally fit in the pan like that, it's fine. The idea that you need several quarts of water, several times the volume of the pasta, is a bit ...
Cascabel's user avatar
  • 58.2k
9 votes

Are these pots suitable to cook in?

You don't see them around so much these days, but they look like a million variants of the old enamelled steel casserole pots, probably last popular in the 70s. They probably ought to have lids.
Tetsujin's user avatar
  • 30k
8 votes

Do pan "pores" exist, what are they, and what are their effects?

Mechanical engineer by trade here with a smattering of materials science background, I think I can weigh in a bit on this topic. There are a few questions that I think are getting conflated with this ...
Felix Xu's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Method to brew a large batch of iced tea without steeping in a plastic container

Stephie's answer covers a couple convenient options: there are large ceramic pots, and any stainless steel vessel can work. (Traditionally, metal has been frowned upon for tea brewing because it ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 32.2k
8 votes
Accepted

Baking in drinking glasses -- heat vs. logo paint, other issues

What you want to do has been done successfully. There is a video and instructions here: Guinness Cake baked in Guinness glasses I believe the greatest risk of thermal shock would come when you ...
Debbie M.'s user avatar
  • 5,468
8 votes
Accepted

Can I use regular gas (stove) cookware (pots and pans) in a fireplace?

It's not impossible, but you should choose your pans with care. That 550°C figure is for the outside of a wood-burning stove, and would be faintly glowing red in a dark room. In practice the stove ...
Chris H's user avatar
  • 44.2k
8 votes

Best way to deal with drying dishware to minimize hazards?

Bacteria and molds need 3 things in the right amount to thrive: nutrients water temperature If you don't let water go away from the surface, you are just relying on the lack of nutrients, which won'...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 1,330
8 votes

Best way to deal with drying dishware to minimize hazards?

Frame challenge: It sounds like you expect hazardous bacteria or other contaminants to form on your dishes if you expose the inside of the glass bowl to the environment (like air or a kitchen towel). ...
Elmy's user avatar
  • 1,248
7 votes
Accepted

Is there an easy way to tell if a pan/pot is oven-safe?

Speaking in generalizations, without knowing the details of content: Anything with a non-stick coating- I wouldn't put it in the oven. If you don't know what the non-stick coating is made of, you can'...
Tisha Fromal's user avatar
7 votes

Safe to use non-sticky pan with scratches?

Related question here. A few years back, I spent a lot of time researching this issue over at Chowhound. There have probably been hundreds of scientific studies on this stuff, so you can read about ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 32.2k
7 votes
Accepted

Did I ruin my stoneware dutch oven by heating it on a gas stove?

It sounds like you had a lucky escape. It's not temperature itself that would damage stoneware as it's fired at over 1000C in manufacture (Wikipedia). Differential thermal expansion is what breaks ...
Chris H's user avatar
  • 44.2k
7 votes
Accepted

Reuse frying & sauce pans multiple times during cooking session

I think thermal shock is unlikely to be a problem at the temperatures you're likely to use. I had heard that it is mainly a problem if the pan is very hot (500 degrees or more, although some ...
Megha's user avatar
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