24

NO! It would not. They will break, possibly violently. Unless they are labeled for that use, don't do it.


23

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


22

There is no problem with putting either stainless steel or non-stick pans in the dishwasher in terms of their materials. However: Non-stick pans are often better washed gently by hand without too much soap, so they retain a bit of oil. This helps them stay non-stick. You may note that a dishwashed non-stick pan is quite sticky the first time you use it ...


22

I specifically would like to know if anyone has used a (verified) borosilicate glass pot on a gas burner stove top I have used borosilicate glass vessels on a number of different heat sources, both in laboratory circumstances and on a standard home gas stove. and if it is safe for regular use, and by "regular use" I would specifically mean: ...


21

What makes a good pan? The main properties of a metal pan that are of interest to a cook are: Evenness of heat distribution. Every burner produces more heat in some spots than others. The better the pan conduct heat, the more this heat is evened out before it is conducted into the food being cooked, which is important to prevent local hotspots in the pan, ...


21

No, you can't. You should always assume glass is not safe to use on the stovetop. Essentially none of it is, and while there are a very few exceptions, they'll say so explicitly. (For example this set says stovetop-safe in the description.) That bowl is nothing special, definitely not stovetop-safe - it'd shatter under the thermal stress. If you look ...


19

I think it's a bad idea... Crepes are made with a batter (as opposed to a dough) spread thin over a hot metal plate (seasoned or oiled). A baking stone has a porous surface and I suppose the batter would just get stuck to your stone. It doesn't happen with a dough because it has enough structure to not fill every pore of the stone on contact. On the other ...


18

Where do you live? European Pyrex is made from borosilicate glass, the same as in laboratory's equipment; American Pyrex is made from common soda-lime glass. If you are in America, don't bother trying it at all; soda-lime glass is sensitive to thermal shock. Even though it's tempered for kitchenware, it is nowhere near good enough for the burner. In Europe,...


18

I have a ceramic-coated pan too, and always treated it with care (plastic utensils, no overheating, etc.) It failed too, after some time (I think I've had it for 9 months now, and used frequently). Unlike a failed Teflon pan, it does not look or feel any different. But while at the beginning it was superslick, with everything gliding right off it in a ...


17

No, don't do it. Good crepes are made within narrow parameters of heat exchange. You can observe this when making crepes on the stovetop - the first crepe is almost always bad. The pan seems to be either not hot enough, or too hot. After the first one, it somehow "stabilizes", or extra heat starts to creep on you. In the second case, it will get too hot ...


14

Just tried it - answer is no. Wish i'd read this before it cracked because of the heat.


14

First, I'll say that I used to be a big fan of cast iron. I never used it for every kitchen task, but I have a lot of cast iron pans and pots, and at my peak a few years back, I was probably using it for 80-90% of my cooking. However, I now use it only rarely for specialized tasks, which I'll explain. Cast iron and copper have completely different thermal ...


14

This is the microstructure of SAE 304, a steel type commonly used in pans: At this magnification, its "pores" look like cracks. Now see it at other magnifications (still a SAE 304, other types of steel look completely different, especially if you look at martenistic steels): It gets even more complicated than that, because steel structure differs between ...


14

I work for a carbon steel cookware producer in China and just like Athanasius, I too have become interested in the question of "Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?" I have also watched the RouxBe video about making a stainless steel pan more non-stick through pre-heating. To summarize the main point, it says to heat the pan until ...


12

The usual materials used in an oven (no matter if electric or gas) are almost all food-safe non-melting materials used for cooking vessels. If you can use it on a stove top, it should be OK for the oven too (unless it has a handle from a different material). Metal. Oven pans are made from non-reactive metals (like stainless steel) or reactive metals with a ...


12

A lot of those nicely shaped cakes are made from a rectangular or round cake. You just cut the required sizes and shapes so you end up with something T-rex looking. You put a bit of frosting between each pair of pieces, so that they stick together and the cake does not fall apart. Usually the whole thing is covered with fondant, so you cannot see the ...


11

This one had me scratching my head for a while. I came across the phrases "stovetop oven", "raised center skillet", "steamer pan" and a bunch of other dead-ends. Well, I finally stumbled onto "Ultimate Dutch Oven": Looks familiar, doesn't it? This one is cast iron, but what you've found is clearly a non-stick version of the same thing. It's sold as ...


11

The general answer is that you use a loaf pan if you want the common rectangular loaf shape (it's good for slicing for toast and sandwiches), and otherwise you don't need one. For example, the link you gave for french bread completely describes how to shape and bake the loaf. There's no wrapping in foil or anything; you coax it into that shape, and it's ...


11

These are just mineral (calcium) stains from your water source. They will not affect the stainless steel. The quickest way to clean stainless steel from burnt on oil, food, and water stains is to use a polyprop/ester scouring pad (e.g. 3M's branded as Scotch-Brite). Use a little liquid dish wash soap, a poly scourer pad, and a generous serve of elbow ...


11

No, this is a very, very bad idea. The thermal gradient can lead to uneven expansion and shattering. This is true of the modern product as well as the historical borosilicate product.


10

From the PyrexLove FAQ: Is it all right to use my vintage Pyrex directly on the stove? We’d like to just nip this one in the bud and say - NO. Some pieces actually say “Not for stovetop”, but we never put vintage pyrex bowls, casseroles or whatever directly on the stove, ever. You can try it, but we’d rather not risk it. But we do get a ...


10

Anodizing is a surface treatment that thickens the natural oxide layer of a piece of metal. Aluminum is the most commonly used metal that is anodized, but magnezium, zinc, and some other metals can also be anodized. Steel can not be effectively anodized. So any description of pots and pans that uses "anodized" is almost certainly referring to aluminum. ...


10

I wouldn't pay much attention to this list. I would just get my cookware based on what functionality I need, not based on what my stove manufacturer says. The idea of not using cast iron on glass to protect the glass from scratches is as perverse as keeping a sunhat in the closet and going to the beach bareheaded to protect the sunhat from color fading. ...


10

Raw protein sticks to hot stainless steel as soon as it comes into contact with it. However, once the layer which is stuck to the pan cooks through, it releases from the pan. The trick is to heat the pan over a low heat before adding the eggs, then don't touch them until there is a layer of cooked egg on the bottom - about a minute or two. Then when you ...


10

They should be fine. It's possible that they'll be a bit gooey, or just a touch underdone. The high sides of the pan may shield the cookies from the heat, just a little bit. The glass pans will absorb a little more heat, and so take just a tad longer to heat up - partially balanced by the fact they take a tad longer to cool down, and so might carry over a ...


10

The specks are corrosion pits. Austenitic stainless (aka- 18-8 , 304 , and several other numbers) are notorious for pitting in salt (halides). The 316 and 317 with molybdenum are more resistant but I doubt any cookware producer would go to the extra expense to use these alloys. However, I expect sitting for a couple days with salted water would be needed for ...


9

The device is called a "panini press" and they're available fairly small. I've seen ones which aren't much larger than a toaster.


9

If it is completely empty, you probably can't reach dangerous temperatures with your stove. The iron itself melts at 1500°C. The seasoning can be burnt off at much lower temperatures, a self-cleaning cycle in the oven is enough for it (500°C). I have taken an iron pan to above 400°C without damaging the seasoning. (I don't know exactly how high it was, my ...


9

I think the cost effective-ness and worth it portion of the question is quite subjective since there isn't a way to directly compare salt with cookware grade salt block. These salt blocks are considered unusable when it becomes cracked and fall apart, not when all the salt has been used up. Thus the price is for the novelty of using these blocks to cook food ...


9

"For a few seconds", if literal, is the problem. You want to make sure that the pan is well heated before adding your batter. My mom's test was to sprinkle some water on the pan, and see if the droplets danced around. Leidenfrost effect. As you're using quite a bit of oil, you can also look for the shimmering that will happen just before the oil starts ...


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