11

You overheated it, tin melts at 450 F . It may have a few per-cent of other metals in the tin that would raise the melt temperature slightly.It should be fine now except if the surface is now rough ,it will be difficult to clean. The tin can be remelted and smoothed. Unfortunately that requires some skill/experience. I have retinned at least one, I added ...


10

Summary: All materials are different, and copper is no exception. It has some unique thermal properties that may be desirable for some applications. But other combinations of materials (particularly aluminum) within a modern stainless pan can have other unique advantages that come close to -- and in some ways exceed -- copper's properties. (For a ...


5

After periodically coming back to the question over a few months, I think I've found some answers. Remco's answer gives part of the justification (crosslinking pectin chains), but there are other complications. The short answer is there may be minor chemical benefits to unlined copper for preserve-making, but one can likely achieve similar benefits by just ...


5

As @caconym said, copper ions can bind to pectins, which are the gelling agents in jam. The gelification behaviour of pectin depends on serveral factors, but for those in jams, the important ones are low water activity (which is due to the sugar content, and also the factor that prevents spoilage), and low pH. Addition of a small amount of copper ions ...


4

As a general rule, a solid copper pan and a "copper-lined" (either plated, or possibly a thicker layer bonded in some way) are likely to be quite different in terms of heat distribution, since stainless steel is a very poor conductor of heat and copper is a very good one. So, when heated "unevenly" a copper pan of a given thickness will conduct heat to even ...


4

Downsides: Copper is toxic. You have to get the inside lined with tin. Tin has a very low melting point and can melt during cooking. Even if it doesn't, it wears off with usage and the pan has to be lined again. I don't know how easy it is to find somebody who lines, but nowadays, it is not so common. Alternatively, you can buy a copper pan with a thin ...


4

An old question, but I have a few things to add and clarify. The question is a bit like preparing to "upgrade" to a new car, and asking people: "Should I buy the Mustang or the giant Ford pickup truck?" There's really not a good answer to that question, since the items in question are at different ends of the car spectrum and they have vastly different ...


4

First you need salt, then you need an acid. Some methods use flour because the paste with the flour is easier to control. For acid you can use vinegar or lemon juice; citric acid would probably work beautifully (from Ecnerwal in comments). One of the videos I'm posting here uses white wine vinegar. Their salt is probably Maldon Sea Salt Flakes, which would ...


3

If you are considering heating any food in it, I would say no. Silver itself is not especially pleasant (wikipedia and a more detailed CDC study). So, if you have a dish that is losing its silver plating, it would be wise to be overly cautious than casual about using it for food again. Is the base copper or brass? There is copper in brass anyway. Copper ...


3

Copper heats up and cools down quickly. Le Creuset heats slowly but retains the heat. You can go from stove to oven in both. Copper is wonderful, but expensive and difficult to maintain. Depending on your use, tin can hold up well. If you are using it every day it will eventually require re-tinning which is also expensive. If you go copper, the commercial ...


2

I have never sprung for copper pans, so this is just from my general research. Here are the factors I would look at: How thick is the copper? You want it to be thick enough to retain and distribute the heat of the burner. How is the handle attached? Rivets are better than welded for long term use. (This is general to any metal pan.) What is the handle ...


2

Lemon juice or diluted vinegar (say 1:1), a rag and patience. Gentle and light scrubbing. Rinse afterwards and dry thoroughly. The bad news is that it is not going to last very long. Even if you are not using at all, depending on your ambient humidity and temperature, it will tarnish again, albeit perhaps uniformly. It is still better to remove the oxide ...


2

Using a bit of tamarind pulp and scrub, I used to clean the copper vessels. It makes it clean and shiny. Hope this helps. Wiki In homes and temples, especially in Buddhist Asian countries, the fruit pulp is used to polish brass shrine statues and lamps, and copper, brass, and bronze utensils. The copper alone or in brass reacts with moist carbon dioxide ...


2

Buy a few pounds/kilos of barley malt extract, dissolve it in a LARGE pot of water, boil, immerse your pans, take them out shiny. Now, what we actually do when making beer is to try and remove any corrosion on the copper bits with an acid (vinegar, a citric acid solution, or "star-san" which is a phosphoric acid based sanitizer) before we plunge the copper ...


1

Try boiling a mixture of water and baking soda and then turn off the heat and let it sit until it cools enough to scrub. You might try 1/2 cup baking soda to a quart of water. Another trick is a baking powder paste. Same idea but more intense. Make a paste, bring to a boil only briefly and then scrub.


1

Well you can clean the copper and the tin with some tamarind, it is a trick we use in our home to clean the copper and brass vessels and they come out to be very clean. Your may notice discoloration again in some 20 or 30 days after cleaning but then you can clean it again! Just wet the cleaning surface with some water and apply tamarind or simple tamarind ...


1

I recently bought a copper bowl and whipped ONE egg white in it ending up with enough fluff to fill three ramekins for apricot shuffle.


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