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33

The answer it seems is - no, you can't just use any variety of corn. It seems that you need in particular a hard shell around the kernel that is not present in sweetcorn varieties. I also suspect that it is harder to make than one might imagine, you need a specific percentage of water in the kernel to get it to pop - this is why you can't store unpopped ...


24

It's a children's book, but The Popcorn Book by Tomie de Paola is actually a very comprehensive summary on the history and science of popcorn. Popcorn pops because the kernels contain small amounts of moisture which, when heated, cook the starches inside the popcorn, causing them to rapidly expand and exploding out the kernel. (This is my basic ...


16

Is the corn still in the husk ? Do you have aluminium foil ? Keep the corn in the husk and roast until cooked; it's better to remove some of the leaves and dip them in water to add some moisture to the corn before putting on the grill. If you have aluminium foil, you can either keep the corn as is and wrap in foil, or remove the husk and wrap in foil and put ...


16

Even husked corn can be nicely roasted on an open grill. Use gentle heat, turning frequently until the kernels are golden. Some kernels will be darker, even charred a bit, but I find that enjoyable.


15

No, you need popping corn. Popcorn works because it contains the right kind of starch; it has a hard husk that is quite waterproof; it contains the right amount of moisture (14–20%, according to Wikipedia). When you cook the corn, the water turns to steam, and the husk stops the steam escaping until the pressure builds up enough to make the kernel explode ...


8

Good question! Corn is very versatile. I've found that fresh and frozen whole kernel corn are very interchangeable when used in casseroles. Most casseroles cook long enough that you could use either without making any adjustments. However, canned corn is a different animal. Because it is more processed I would use it in recipes that call for it but I would ...


8

If you could, what you get wouldn't be your standard corn meal. There are a few different varieties of corn, and what you get frozen would be 'sweet corn'. Corn meal and corn masa are made from either 'flour corn', 'dent corn' (aka 'field corn') or 'flint corn', all of which are lower sugar, higher starch, and allowed to dry in the field. You'd have ...


8

I agree with @rumtscho that you are unlikely to get the desired results from canned corn as you really probably need raw. If you do try canned, make sure it is whole kernel type and that might improve your results. If you cannot get fresh corn, frozen, uncooked corn might work, but even that is usually blanched which might be enough to change the results ...


8

In Bolivia we have this kind of giant popcorn, called "Pasankalla": I do not know what type of corn is used to create it, but obviously is not the same one used to create ordinary popcorn. Bon appetit!


7

This might be an old question but I still stumbled on it and figured others would too, so it's still worth answering. Difference: The grind makes all the difference. Pre-made masa for tortillas doesn't have lard mixed into it. It's just finely ground and mixed with water to make the dough. Great for tortillas. Pre-made masa for tamales is very light and ...


7

Corn has husk, silk and kernels. In the middle there is the cob, which only becomes visible after you have eaten the kernels. The husk is, botanically speaking, formed of leaves, but it has a different texture from the standard leaves and encloses the cob with the kernels snugly. It can be left on the cob during boiling, or removed before boiling. For ...


7

Too long for comment so: I should think fresh would work. It's just dried that comes prehydrated. I'd cut down on boiling time. Say 5 cup corn, 1.5 gallon water, 1/4 cup CaOH (Cal, slaked lime, pickling lime). Boil gently 30 min (instead of hour). Let sit overnight. Rinse 4-5 times to remove excess CaOH, put thru your corn grinder to make massa. add a ...


7

Nixtamalization is a culinary process that begins with dried corn kernels (maize), and uses alkalinity to alter the chemistry of the corn. The process is thousands of years old, first recorded by the the Aztecs, but probably older and more wide spread. This guide is very informative. Here the author describes the result of the nixtimalization process: This ...


6

It's canned cream-style corn that the recipes are expecting you to use, it's not a substitution at all. It does make for nice cornbread.


6

I use the coarse cornmeal because I like the flavor. I took my cue from the muffin recipe on the bag: It said to soak your cornmeal in the milk for 10 minutes. I did this for my buttermilk cornbread and it was delicious. I didn't add any extra milk.


6

Well, it looks like I found my answer: Field corn is used for creating masa de maíz (see this link for my source). Field corn includes a few types of corn (dent, flour, flint, waxy). I'm not sure if all types of field corn are used for masa de maíz, however. So, if anyone has a more specific answer, feel free to give it. I'm guessing really any kind of ...


5

Hard corns can be cooked the way native peoples cooked it. If it is dry then you must 'lye' it first. This is done by putting wood ash ( about 2 cups) from fully burned hard wood into a big pail of water . Strain the lye water into a cooking pot. Boil your corn kernels gently for about an hour. Thoroughly rinse the corn free of lye water. Now you can prepare ...


5

In some cuisines, the masa isn't usually corn at all. Sometimes it's rice, sometimes it's plantain and/or other starchy fruit. The tamale-like dish is actually called pasteles, but the difference between tamales and pasteles seems to be primarily the corn. Check out this informational link and these recipes from Epicurious and The Polynesian Kitchen; and ...


5

It sounds to me like you are accidentally making popcorn, which is a result of hot gasses building up inside the hull of the kernel. Fresh kernels typically have a tougher hull than frozen or canned, both of which use methods that weaken the hull. Freezing the corn causes growing ice crystals to damage cells. Canned corn is boiled, which both seals the can ...


5

Masa Harina is nixtamalized corn flour, as is anything made from it. So, most corn tortillas you can buy are, as are premade tamales, sopes, etc. While you may come across varieties made from non-treated corn flour (be suspicious of anything bright yellow), most are treated. Corn/tortilla chips are a little bit more of a mixed bag; some are made from corn ...


4

As jolenealaska pointed out in a comment, corn flour has no gluten, which is essential to the texture of most breads and many other baked goods. Unless you replace the gluten with vital wheat gluten or some kind of gluten substitute, your corn flour loaf would have a crumbly texture very uncharacteristic of ciabatta. rumtscho added: If by "corn flour" ...


4

I don't think that substitution will work out as you wanted. Nixmatalization changes the composition of the corn hull, the treatment weakens the tough outer shell and generally makes it very different from untreated corn. And the precooked flour is, well, already cooked - boiled before grinding to flour. Their texture, cooking time and taste will be ...


4

A major factor to note is that to get the corn syrup to 394K you don't just have to heat it, you have to concentrate it by boiling off some of the water. You need to take into account the latent heat of vaporisation of water, about 2,260 kJ/kg in the temperature range of interest. It's easy to see that this can be a major factor. Hard ball candy is 90% ...


4

There are a variety of reasons your tortillas might be thicker than you'd like. My first tip to you is to line your tortilla press with a thick plastic sheet on each side instead of paper; I use a circle cut from a freezer bag. This makes it easier to peel thinner tortillas loose. Beyond that, some troubleshooting: Flour consistency: grainier doughs, such ...


3

Neither broccoli nor corn is going to be all that picky regarding oven temperature, you'll be fine just splitting the difference. Since corn is the less picky of the two items, I'd go 400F. Expect the broccoli to take slightly longer than the recipe, and the corn to take less time. But don't make yourself nuts about it. Neither corn slightly more done than ...


3

Creamed corn is a dish made from the kernels of fresh, sweet corn, that are cooked down in their own juices. Cream is not normally added; the creaminess is the liquid from the fresh corn thickened with the native starch. This is in contrast, to for example, creamed spinach, which is spinach cooked down in a bechemel or cream sauce. Canned versions of ...


3

I would suggest puncturing or cutting into the kernels, actually. Popping usually happens when the steam trapped inside expands enough to force its way out of the hull - if the hull itself is punctured, the steam should be able to escape normally or more normally). Especially if this is paired with a lower heat, slow cooking style that will give the ...


3

Corn is a wildly diverse crop, human breeding has adapted it for many, many purposes: Cereal crop to be processed: You harvest the dried kernals of certain varieties of corn from the cob, and store them until they're ready to be processed and consumed, usually by soaking them in lye, then grinding them into a paste (masa) that is either used in recipes as ...


3

Possible definitions are available in a recent publication of Annals of New York Academy of Sciences - look for table 4. Corn meal is listed as particle size from 300 to 600µm, with fat content of 1.8%, while corn flour is listed as particle size less than 212 µm, with fat content of 2.7%. They also mention various definitions in US CFR 137, which provide ...


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