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33

The answer it seems is - no, you can't just use any variety of corn. It seems that you need in particular a hard shell around the kernel that is not present in sweetcorn varieties. I also suspect that it is harder to make than one might imagine, you need a specific percentage of water in the kernel to get it to pop - this is why you can't store unpopped ...


24

It's a children's book, but The Popcorn Book by Tomie de Paola is actually a very comprehensive summary on the history and science of popcorn. Popcorn pops because the kernels contain small amounts of moisture which, when heated, cook the starches inside the popcorn, causing them to rapidly expand and exploding out the kernel. (This is my basic ...


18

The difference between the two can be seen below (the post it is from is an experiment comparing corn meal and flour used in anadema bread): The corn flour is the white, finer ingredient on the right. The first obvious difference is that the texture will differ between the two. The second is that it would have different uses. Both would be effective at ...


15

No, you need popping corn. Popcorn works because it contains the right kind of starch; it has a hard husk that is quite waterproof; it contains the right amount of moisture (14–20%, according to Wikipedia). When you cook the corn, the water turns to steam, and the husk stops the steam escaping until the pressure builds up enough to make the kernel explode ...


12

Corn (Maize) is clearly a cereal grain, and not any of the other things you mention. Even the farmers and agricultural agencies consider it a grain - it's one of the "official grains of Canada" and regulated by the Canadian grain commission. I'm not sure when or why it started being called a vegetable, but as far as the culinary definition goes, it has far ...


9

If you don't want gritty bread, use finely milled polenta. Roughly milled polenta is like semolina, and results in a gritty batter. Finely milled polenta is like flour, and results in a smooth batter. I don't know the proper names for the different milling grades in English. I don't mean cornflour, which is pure maize starch from the inside of the maize ...


9

My grandparents were Western Nebraska farmers who grew corn (and other things.) Most was "field corn" which is suitable only for livestock feed. Some was sweet corn, which is for humans. Grandma used to make what she called "parched corn." Sweet corn was dried out by pulling the husks back and hanging the ears down by tacking the husks to the side of the ...


8

Good question! Corn is very versatile. I've found that fresh and frozen whole kernel corn are very interchangeable when used in casseroles. Most casseroles cook long enough that you could use either without making any adjustments. However, canned corn is a different animal. Because it is more processed I would use it in recipes that call for it but I would ...


8

If you could, what you get wouldn't be your standard corn meal. There are a few different varieties of corn, and what you get frozen would be 'sweet corn'. Corn meal and corn masa are made from either 'flour corn', 'dent corn' (aka 'field corn') or 'flint corn', all of which are lower sugar, higher starch, and allowed to dry in the field. You'd have ...


8

I agree with @rumtscho that you are unlikely to get the desired results from canned corn as you really probably need raw. If you do try canned, make sure it is whole kernel type and that might improve your results. If you cannot get fresh corn, frozen, uncooked corn might work, but even that is usually blanched which might be enough to change the results ...


8

In Bolivia we have this kind of giant popcorn, called "Pasankalla": I do not know what type of corn is used to create it, but obviously is not the same one used to create ordinary popcorn. Bon appetit!


7

You fry them in a saucepan with some oil (I use either olive or sunflower). In order they don't explode an become pop-corn, you should have kept them in water for several (6~48) hours before frying them. If you want them softer (and bigger), put them in water at 70°C for about 20~30 minutes. How do you know they are done? When they are golden in the ...


7

Both are ground corn (maize, as they would have it in Europe). The difference is that corn flour is usually ground to a much finer texture than cornmeal. While in some contexts (such as breading chicken), they can both be used, you will get different textural results. In general, you want to use the right product. For example, corn muffins are ...


7

In terms of culinary use, corn is either a grain or a vegetable. When we use it as cornmeal, polenta, or even popcorn, we're essentially thinking of it as a grain - and it really is a cereal grain. But when we eat sweet corn off the cob, or incorporated into a dish, we're thinking of it more as a vegetable. (It's still really a grain, but I think it's fair ...


7

Corn has husk, silk and kernels. In the middle there is the cob, which only becomes visible after you have eaten the kernels. The husk is, botanically speaking, formed of leaves, but it has a different texture from the standard leaves and encloses the cob with the kernels snugly. It can be left on the cob during boiling, or removed before boiling. For ...


7

Too long for comment so: I should think fresh would work. It's just dried that comes prehydrated. I'd cut down on boiling time. Say 5 cup corn, 1.5 gallon water, 1/4 cup CaOH (Cal, slaked lime, pickling lime). Boil gently 30 min (instead of hour). Let sit overnight. Rinse 4-5 times to remove excess CaOH, put thru your corn grinder to make massa. add a ...


7

Nixtamalization is a culinary process that begins with dried corn kernels (maize), and uses alkalinity to alter the chemistry of the corn. The process is thousands of years old, first recorded by the the Aztecs, but probably older and more wide spread. This guide is very informative. Here the author describes the result of the nixtimalization process: This ...


6

I use the coarse cornmeal because I like the flavor. I took my cue from the muffin recipe on the bag: It said to soak your cornmeal in the milk for 10 minutes. I did this for my buttermilk cornbread and it was delicious. I didn't add any extra milk.


6

This might be an old question but I still stumbled on it and figured others would too, so it's still worth answering. Difference: The grind makes all the difference. Pre-made masa for tortillas doesn't have lard mixed into it. It's just finely ground and mixed with water to make the dough. Great for tortillas. Pre-made masa for tamales is very light and ...


6

It's canned cream-style corn that the recipes are expecting you to use, it's not a substitution at all. It does make for nice cornbread.


6

Well, it looks like I found my answer: Field corn is used for creating masa de maíz (see this link for my source). Field corn includes a few types of corn (dent, flour, flint, waxy). I'm not sure if all types of field corn are used for masa de maíz, however. So, if anyone has a more specific answer, feel free to give it. I'm guessing really any kind of ...


5

Hard corns can be cooked the way native peoples cooked it. If it is dry then you must 'lye' it first. This is done by putting wood ash ( about 2 cups) from fully burned hard wood into a big pail of water . Strain the lye water into a cooking pot. Boil your corn kernels gently for about an hour. Thoroughly rinse the corn free of lye water. Now you can prepare ...


5

You can do it. My family has done it before, and I like the outcome. The texture is not the same as with vegetable corn, it is mealier, and the outer skins are much tougher. It is up to you whether you like it. And for substitution, I don't know what is available where you live, but around here canned corn kernels are really cheap and available all year ...


5

You can soak the cornmeal in water overnight if you remember to reduce the water in your recipe to compensate for it. In your recipe, you can soak it in the milk and then you don't need to do any compensating.


5

Well, since you asked for it, with a warning that I've neither cooked nor consumed roast hominy: If you cover the pot with something that doesn't let steam out, it might slow or prevent the roasting. A stainless steel mesh would let the steam out while also keeping the kernels in. Alternatively, you could use some heavy-duty foil with a lot of small holes ...


5

Botanically, it is a grain. Its a giant grass. In most cuisines, it treated mostly as a starch. The entire corn cob is a multiple fruit.


5

In some cuisines, the masa isn't usually corn at all. Sometimes it's rice, sometimes it's plantain and/or other starchy fruit. The tamale-like dish is actually called pasteles, but the difference between tamales and pasteles seems to be primarily the corn. Check out this informational link and these recipes from Epicurious and The Polynesian Kitchen; and ...


5

It sounds to me like you are accidentally making popcorn, which is a result of hot gasses building up inside the hull of the kernel. Fresh kernels typically have a tougher hull than frozen or canned, both of which use methods that weaken the hull. Freezing the corn causes growing ice crystals to damage cells. Canned corn is boiled, which both seals the can ...


4

Corn kernels are seeds and the kernels is an ear. All the fruits of graminae are ears: this means "seed heads" made ​​up of many fruits (usually insignificant) growing together, precisely in an ear. When the fruits are ripe ears of generating seeds. In wheat, rice, rye grass, they are ears. Oats are infructescenses In corn are cobs: All the fruits of ...


4

As jolenealaska pointed out in a comment, corn flour has no gluten, which is essential to the texture of most breads and many other baked goods. Unless you replace the gluten with vital wheat gluten or some kind of gluten substitute, your corn flour loaf would have a crumbly texture very uncharacteristic of ciabatta. rumtscho added: If by "corn flour" ...


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