18

It's to prevent caking. See, for example, the second FAQ on Domino Sugar's website: It is not recommended to substitute confectioners sugar for granulated sugar. Since confectioners sugar has a much finer texture, and it contains a small percentage of cornstarch to prevent caking, substituting can give you unexpected results. Many shredded cheeses ...


12

You could try using arrowroot. This is a widely available alternative to cornstarch - it is used in cookery because it doesn't turn liquids cloudy like cornstarch does. In your case, it might work better as it also has a more neutral flavour. Substitute 2 tbsps of arrowroot for 1 tbsp cornstarch, and make a slurry with cool water as you would cornstarch. ...


8

I've seen bread recipes like the one that you described. When bread is baked in an oven with steam- the starch in the crust is able to gelatinize before it all dries out and becomes crispy. This is what makes the crust crisp, shiny, and delicious- characteristic of "artisan" breads. Most people don't have steam enhanced ovens (or the ability to hack their ...


7

I'm going to recommend trying something a little bit different - instead of "thickening", I think what you really want is "body", which is similar, but different sensation. To get the mouth-feel I think you are after, you should try a complex sugar, like maltodextrin. Maltodextrin is a complex carbohydrate, made from starch and composed of many sugar ...


6

Cook the flour with some butter or oil before adding to the soup. You are making what is called a roux which is a traditional French method for thickening sauces and soups Measure roughly two parts of general purpose flour and one part of fat (or equal parts by weight), and cook until bubbling and the raw flour taste has gone, or it is lightly brown ...


6

Corn starch is a thickener, but not right out of the box. It needs to be heated to gelatinize, which also gets rid of the chalky taste. If you tried to cook your random sauce now, you'd get a very thick mass that could easily be a prop in a bad sci-fi or horror movie, but not a dipping sauce. And the sheer amount of starch would "absorb and eliminate" most ...


5

In an answer to another question, someone else was looking for answers on dealing with thickening dairy. If you want to address thickening with corn starch, here are some beginning steps; Use the right ratio of corn starch slurry to liquid: 1 tablespoon corn starch thickens 1 cup of liquid Use the corn starch in a slurry: although you didn't mention clumps (...


5

They are interchangeable 1:1, with virtually no changes needed. There shouldn't be any difference in the final sauce except that the cornstarch thickened one will be a bit more opaque. If you substitute the other way (use potato starch instead of cornstarch) don't let it hard boil (not for safety reasons, just aesthetics). In what country was the recipe ...


5

The key in a stir-fry is that the ingedients can at all times move about freely. A spatula shouldn't really be needed, the way it is in sautéing, rather you use a spoon/ladle to just, well, stir the loose mixture. In fact even that isn't ideal: arguably, it should rather be called toss-fry, because vigorously moving the pan is the best way to keep everything ...


4

You are probably stirring the pudding too much. Cornstarch starts thickening at about 205°F/95°C. Once the pudding has got to that point and has thickened, stop stirring, otherwise you will interfere with the starch formation that causes the thickening. Using electric beaters probably means you are missing the point when the pudding has thickened and quickly ...


4

Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer has a (somewhat) similar base to this, in that it has no eggs, and uses a mix of milk and cream - along with a tiny bit of cream cheese to provide the requisite proteins, and corn starch to thicken. In my opinion, it's one of the best ice cream bases out there. I also have the Perfect Scoop, and have ...


4

Cool oil. Filter through coffee filter. Store in refrigerator. You can reuse. Heat oil to deep fry temp. Fry a neutral piece of bread. Taste. You can reuse your oil as long as it doesn't impart an off taste to the bread. My guess is that, in a stove top situation, you won't get more than one or two uses before the oil is degraded too much for frying.


4

Unflavored gelatin would likely work for you. It's available in most grocery stores. I'm not sure the ratio you'd want, but 1/4 oz. unflavored gelatin into 1/2 gallon (!) tea should have some effect. Also, drug stores now sell stuff that thickens liquids under names like Nectar-Thick. The stuff isn't cheap, but it's not horrifically expensive either. It ...


4

It would probably work but for the proper consistency of the finished product, your cooked cornstarch slurry would need to be very thick. This would make it difficult to mix into a homogenized smooth mixture unless you were to use a blender to mix them. Rather than cornstarch, xanthan gum or arrowroot flour, why not use tapioca powder/flour? It thickens ...


4

Baking soda or baking powder? Powder will produce gas bubbles. Both baking soda (but not baking powder) and corn starch are prevalent in chinese cooking and its derivatives elsewhere in Asia. I am reasonably sure that they are used even in home cooking. Corn starch is used as a binder and texturing agent in minced or finely chopped meat. I have also seen ...


3

If you don't want to use Corn flour, then substitute it with Potato starch. Potato starch will give you very similar result and you won't need to change your existing recipe.


3

The cornstarch does indeed prevent the extremely fine grained sugar from caking, but it also serves a purpose beyond that. Since cornstarch forms a non-Newtonian fluid (makes liquid more viscous) when water is added, adding it to powdered sugar allows you to use it to make glazes and icings. Without the cornstarch, you'd just be pouring sweet water over your ...


3

I don't have any info on the affect of pH, but cornstarch can make your compote separate when canned: http://www.sbcanning.com/2011/08/canning-pie-filling-education-in-clear.html. Two alternative thickeners are tapioca and clearjel. I've used clearjel for canning with excellent results. I haven't used tapioca to can, but do prefer it in my pies. (posted ...


3

In addition to MFG's excellent answer above, I'll also comment that I find tapioca starch has a very neutral starch flavor, and that substituting it for cornstarch can reduce undesirable flavors.


3

It is difficult to give an authoritative answer because who knows what a "typical" pie might be like. It might be different for every person you talk to. I will therefore answer just for myself. All of the made-from-scratch pudding pies that I have made have been very similar- a lot of sugar and fat and some starch to make the gel. Usually recipes also call ...


3

It all revolves around gluten and gluten chains. Cake flour is low protein, and bread flour is high protein, and everything else lies somewhere between. Individual brands have different levels of protein depending on their formulation. That protein, when combined with water, is what makes your stretchy gluten chains, and those are the difference between ...


3

Per this page from The Cook's Thesaurus many starches can be used for thickening but some work better than others for certain applications. For the purpose of a fruit sauce arrowroot would probably be your best option. arrowroot starch = arrowroot powder = arrowroot = arrowroot flour This starch thickener has several advantages over cornstarch. It ...


3

Use extra firm tofu for frying or stews. Pat it well before marinated but do not pat after as tofu do not pick up flavor to well. After marinated pick up the tofu cubes with a fork or drain them leaving out the liquid. Toss them around in your flour, rice, corn or potato, until the seem dry. Now the important part, cook them immediately don't let them sit as ...


2

We keep both in the house, and i always seen to find myself in the middle of prep and not being able to find the one I'm looking for. As a consequence, I have subbed katakuriko for corn starch and vice-versa in equal amounts on several occasions, and never had trouble with the results having the wrong texture or tasting strange. That being said, I have ...


2

Let's look at the estimated calories in that recipe: Eggs: 270 Milk: 12 Cornstarch: 15 Butter: 306 So, given that the single largest source of calories in that recipe is the butter -- more than the eggs! -- if you're looking to reduce calorie count cutting back on the butter to 1 Tbs is the way to go. Of course, that will affect the flavor as well. The ...


2

well for the issue of thickening soup or making it creamy the best it always a cornflour. which you don't want to use. it provides taste & thickness both to the soup,it is also used it palak saag recipe. as an alternative in soup you can use either as per your taste and requirements:- 1-make a thick paste made of flour and oil. Slowly beat it in the ...


2

I've just had a go today. I only stirred until all the lumps of cornstarch lumps had gone, about 20 mins. It was getting very thick then! Note that the lemon juice with the sugar and the cream of tartar in the cornflour mix will convert some of the sugar to invert sugar, which is supposed to help reduce the growth and size of sugar crystals (I learnt about ...


2

I finally figured it out! Heat the high-heat oil (grapeseed, etc) in the pan, on medium high Right before putting the tofu in the pan, give it one more quick toss in the cornstarch so the cornstarch is still white powder. (If the cornstarch starts to get absorbed by the marinated tofu (i.e. loses its whiteness), you waited too long to put it in the pan.) ...


2

Both potato and corn starch would work equally well in the preparations you describe. When substituting flour, the proportions are equal, e.g., one tablespoon flour to replace the one tablespoon of tapioca. With cornstarch, it would be less: i.e, one tablespoon of cornstarch per two of tapioca. Were you to use pearl tapioca, it would be two of soaked pearl ...


2

I would argue that it is the gentler methods like Doug suggested which create problems. They are intended for eggs only custards, not eggs-and-starch. If you use them, you risk that your mixture doesn't get hot enough. Then your starch stays uncooked, and your eggs' starch-digesting enzymes stay intact and can liquefy everything. If you use either starch ...


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