11

The problem is not the chocolate, it is the temperature. I don't know what exactly you refer to by "the temperature of starch gelatinization" - the gelatinization of starch is a long, continuous process, that happens long after the starch has swollen and thickened. It is the process that is responsible for bread going stale - but not the process of ...


8

You still need some gluten, otherwise the cake will crumble. Any recipe that is gluten free has to use a number of different additives to mimic the structure provided by the gluten. If you just replaced the flour with cornstarch, your cake or pastry would not be able to rise (it would lack the internal structure to "inflate") and likely crumble as ...


6

Corn starch is a thickener, but not right out of the box. It needs to be heated to gelatinize, which also gets rid of the chalky taste. If you tried to cook your random sauce now, you'd get a very thick mass that could easily be a prop in a bad sci-fi or horror movie, but not a dipping sauce. And the sheer amount of starch would "absorb and eliminate" most ...


5

You are probably stirring the pudding too much. Cornstarch starts thickening at about 205°F/95°C. Once the pudding has got to that point and has thickened, stop stirring, otherwise you will interfere with the starch formation that causes the thickening. Using electric beaters probably means you are missing the point when the pudding has thickened and quickly ...


5

They are interchangeable 1:1, with virtually no changes needed. There shouldn't be any difference in the final sauce except that the cornstarch thickened one will be a bit more opaque. If you substitute the other way (use potato starch instead of cornstarch) don't let it hard boil (not for safety reasons, just aesthetics). In what country was the recipe ...


5

The key in a stir-fry is that the ingedients can at all times move about freely. A spatula shouldn't really be needed, the way it is in sautéing, rather you use a spoon/ladle to just, well, stir the loose mixture. In fact even that isn't ideal: arguably, it should rather be called toss-fry, because vigorously moving the pan is the best way to keep everything ...


5

Unfortunately no. Cornstarch will cook up white while tapioca starch cooks up remarkably clear. You may be able to find tapioca starch at your local Asian market or if your grocery store has a decent organic or gluten-free section. That said, if you speifically need to avoid tapioca for some reason, you could try arrowroot powder. I haven't seen it myself, ...


5

Yes. Yes it does. Unfortunately, I did something similar once, and it basically gave my pastry cream the consistency of creme anglaise. It made a delicious ice cream base, but failed as a cream puff filling. My best explanation is that the blender destroyed the protein structure of the partially cooked egg, but my attempts to look into it in the past haven't ...


4

Rice starch is the usual substitute and of course is gluten free which seems important these days. Rice starch IS used in other parts of Asia I'm told to make a similar product. I've given it a try and I'd be pushed to tell the difference. But like anything else it's all about trial, error and experience I suppose.


4

Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer has a (somewhat) similar base to this, in that it has no eggs, and uses a mix of milk and cream - along with a tiny bit of cream cheese to provide the requisite proteins, and corn starch to thicken. In my opinion, it's one of the best ice cream bases out there. I also have the Perfect Scoop, and have ...


4

Cool oil. Filter through coffee filter. Store in refrigerator. You can reuse. Heat oil to deep fry temp. Fry a neutral piece of bread. Taste. You can reuse your oil as long as it doesn't impart an off taste to the bread. My guess is that, in a stove top situation, you won't get more than one or two uses before the oil is degraded too much for frying.


4

Baking soda or baking powder? Powder will produce gas bubbles. Both baking soda (but not baking powder) and corn starch are prevalent in chinese cooking and its derivatives elsewhere in Asia. I am reasonably sure that they are used even in home cooking. Corn starch is used as a binder and texturing agent in minced or finely chopped meat. I have also seen ...


4

It would probably work but for the proper consistency of the finished product, your cooked cornstarch slurry would need to be very thick. This would make it difficult to mix into a homogenized smooth mixture unless you were to use a blender to mix them. Rather than cornstarch, xanthan gum or arrowroot flour, why not use tapioca powder/flour? It thickens ...


3

Per this page from The Cook's Thesaurus many starches can be used for thickening but some work better than others for certain applications. For the purpose of a fruit sauce arrowroot would probably be your best option. arrowroot starch = arrowroot powder = arrowroot = arrowroot flour This starch thickener has several advantages over cornstarch. It has ...


3

The cornstarch does indeed prevent the extremely fine grained sugar from caking, but it also serves a purpose beyond that. Since cornstarch forms a non-Newtonian fluid (makes liquid more viscous) when water is added, adding it to powdered sugar allows you to use it to make glazes and icings. Without the cornstarch, you'd just be pouring sweet water over your ...


3

It all revolves around gluten and gluten chains. Cake flour is low protein, and bread flour is high protein, and everything else lies somewhere between. Individual brands have different levels of protein depending on their formulation. That protein, when combined with water, is what makes your stretchy gluten chains, and those are the difference between ...


3

I've just had a go today. I only stirred until all the lumps of cornstarch lumps had gone, about 20 mins. It was getting very thick then! Note that the lemon juice with the sugar and the cream of tartar in the cornflour mix will convert some of the sugar to invert sugar, which is supposed to help reduce the growth and size of sugar crystals (I learnt about ...


3

Both potato and corn starch would work equally well in the preparations you describe. When substituting flour, the proportions are equal, e.g., one tablespoon flour to replace the one tablespoon of tapioca. With cornstarch, it would be less: i.e, one tablespoon of cornstarch per two of tapioca. Were you to use pearl tapioca, it would be two of soaked pearl ...


3

I finally figured it out! Heat the high-heat oil (grapeseed, etc) in the pan, on medium high Right before putting the tofu in the pan, give it one more quick toss in the cornstarch so the cornstarch is still white powder. (If the cornstarch starts to get absorbed by the marinated tofu (i.e. loses its whiteness), you waited too long to put it in the pan.) ...


3

Use extra firm tofu for frying or stews. Pat it well before marinated but do not pat after as tofu do not pick up flavor to well. After marinated pick up the tofu cubes with a fork or drain them leaving out the liquid. Toss them around in your flour, rice, corn or potato, until the seem dry. Now the important part, cook them immediately don't let them sit as ...


3

Turkish delight is not just any sweetened gel, it is very specifically a gel made with starch, and using anything else will make a result which is not recognizable as Turkish delight. If you cannot find corn starch,other starches will work quite well. Wheat or rice starch will probably be as good as cornstarch. I am not entirely sure about the waxy starches ...


3

Some asian cultures clean meats with flour and/or cornstarch to remove the game-y smell from it. Since it's being washed off, I don't think it for the velveting.


3

I have conflicting experience to @Benjamin. I often add a little extra starch to my bread actually, specifically potato starch or sweet rice flour. While all starches gelatinize a little differently, I would not expect you to have any issue shaping the bread, or with rise. What I would expect is a little extra chewiness to the crust and perhaps a bouncy ...


2

Substituting for corn starch, you might look for corn flour (which might the same thing as corn starch depending on location), or look at a chart for substituting other starch thickeners, including rice starch, potato starch, tapioca starch, and others, which will have the closest equivalents. You might consider working with potato starch or rice starch, ...


2

Both the corn starch and cream of tartar are used for thickening in this case. You could try potato or tapioca starch; from my own experience and experiments, however, potato starch creates a very unusual, stretchy consistency. Tapioca starch would most likely produce better results than potato starch. As for the cream of tartar, you can substitute each ...


2

We keep both in the house, and i always seen to find myself in the middle of prep and not being able to find the one I'm looking for. As a consequence, I have subbed katakuriko for corn starch and vice-versa in equal amounts on several occasions, and never had trouble with the results having the wrong texture or tasting strange. That being said, I have ...


2

My pudding was not setting too despite everything perfect I thought I did. But finally I deciphered, I was using cold milk and cold egg just out of fridge. Either it should be on room temp or slightly warm milk.


2

I read the key is to keep the meat cold and to put in the freezer to keep it that way then take it out before it freezes solid and you do this several times during the process right up to cooking.


2

I would argue that it is the gentler methods like Doug suggested which create problems. They are intended for eggs only custards, not eggs-and-starch. If you use them, you risk that your mixture doesn't get hot enough. Then your starch stays uncooked, and your eggs' starch-digesting enzymes stay intact and can liquefy everything. If you use either starch ...


2

Let's look at the estimated calories in that recipe: Eggs: 270 Milk: 12 Cornstarch: 15 Butter: 306 So, given that the single largest source of calories in that recipe is the butter -- more than the eggs! -- if you're looking to reduce calorie count cutting back on the butter to 1 Tbs is the way to go. Of course, that will affect the flavor as well. The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible