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49

Crustaceans like shrimp, lobsters, crabs and crayfish have a pigment called astaxanthin in their shells. Astaxanthin belongs to the terpines class of chemicals of which the carotenoid ¹ class is a subdivision and, in a marine environment, gets produced by an algae that is subsequently consumed by crustaceans (and other animals like salmon, red trout, red ...


8

This is most probably due to the occurrence of a specific carotenoid (Astaxanthin) in their body. This carotenoid (like many others) is susceptible to enzymatic or nonenzymatic oxidation, which depends on the carotenoid structure, the oxygen availability, enzymes, metals, prooxidants and antioxidants, high temperature, and light exposure Sources: ...


5

Did the shell on the grey-brown one seem heavier or look weathered? I have had this more with local caught when I was on the coast than commercial crabs, but, I have had occur something which sounds like what you are describing. When a crab is ready to change its shell, before it loses the old one it will build up a large amount of chemicals in its body ...


3

Keep them frozen. Freezing and thawing will impact the texture adversely. Wrap them well. For 7 days you will not have a problem. For longer storage, vacuum sealing is better so that you avoid freezer burn.


3

A quick comparison of the listed ingredients shows only crab meat for the M&S products (clearly visible in the photos in your question), whereas the Phillip’s website of the pictured product says: Ingredients: Crab Meat, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate (SAPP) added to prevent the formation of struvite crystals. Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate is also called ...


3

"Pasteurized" means that it was kept at temperatures below cooking for a prolonged time, which kills most pathogens. Pasteurized food is reasonably safe for consumption without further cooking, provided it has been kept well refrigerated since the pasteurization. However, I doubt that the taste will be especially good after just a pasteurization. For the ...


3

As a Chinese, who have had many mitten crabs in my life, I think I can provide 2 insights: In Chinese culinary culture, it's not only meat that's the most appreciated, but rather the taste, texture and the freshness especially with seafood. Mitten crabs during the autumn season contains a lot of eggs under the shell. The flavour of the eggs are what's ...


2

I'm not sure about the culinary differences, but I've heard that mitten crabs are a bit sweeter (although I think they may have less meat). As for why they're not more popular, at least in the US mitten crabs are considered an invasive species (i.e., they take over the habitats of the native species, like blue crabs, thus lowering the native population). ...


1

I remember my parents freezing their seafood in those waxed milk cartons filled with water(?). Turns out that's not far off. A number of resources suggest using a brine (salt water solution) in a sealable freezer bag. I imagine tourists must be buying a lot of fish/seafood for them to include Tips on Freezing Seafood on the Prince Edward Islands tourist ...


1

From what I have found so far, Green Crabs (as found on the coasts of the US) are not usually considered good eating, although they are edible. The same species is considered an important food source in parts of Europe. I'm still trying to get reliable info to sort that out. According to The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife "Although most crabs ...


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