14

No. Cream cheese will simply go runny if you melt it. It is in no way a substitute for a hard cheese.


10

Cream cheese sandwiches are tasty, when prepared properly, but you cannot grill them the way you grill grilled (hard) cheese. But you don't need it to melt - it's already nice and malleable, and has the oil in a soft enough state that it hits your tastebuds properly. Some good options for cream cheese sandwiches (or any similar soft cheese, really): Toast ...


6

I hope I am not making a wrong assumption here. But German quark is a soft cheese with somewhat creamy consistency which is made from a yogurt variety (or at least a cultured milk variety) . If "yoghurt cheese" is similar to quark in the way I think it is, you are probably better off not making a substitution, but use a recipe which was made for quark (or ...


6

Yes, you can. The taste will be obviously different, but I don't expect any consequence that would make it unpalatable to the average person. You would be better off if you start with softened cream cheese, but if all you have now is fridge-cold cream cheese, that should work too.


5

Cream cheese is a distinct product, with a flavour and texture of its own. I don't think you'd get the right texture by crumbling paneer into yoghurt, but if you can make paneer you can make cream cheese - or rather [an easy form of ricotta] (https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/nov/14/homemade-ricotta-recipe-anna-jones-modern-cook) , which is a ...


4

That sounds... unpleasant. Cream cheese will melt, yes, but it won't melt in the same way as cheddar. It has more moisture and a very different structure. Where cheddar will retain some structure and a "stretchy" texture, cream cheese will just flow more freely. Layered between bread, it would probably just squirt out of the sides of the sandwich when you ...


4

The 'standard' Boursin flavour is garlic and herbs, which I would imagine would have to contain garlic, or they'd be in trouble for false advertising. However, these days they also produce other flavours like black pepper and chive and shallot. A cursory glance at the ingredients on their website shows no garlic in these latter two.


4

Just as important as the bacterial culture is the use of rennet in cream cheese, which aids in the removal of liquid whey. When making cream cheese, the point is to drain much of the whey, resulting in a semi-solid texture. Rennet helps encourage the solids to curdle and squeeze out liquid. Yogurt doesn't necessarily include the draining step, though it ...


4

There are differences in base ingredients, as well as in the method used for production. The production of cream cheese starts with milk (or a mixture of milk and cream), which is curdled after which the whey is removed. Typically, rennet or acid are used to curdle the milk, so that one can separate the whey from the curds. Cream cheese can be fermented ...


3

The "best before" date is usually way out. Cut it in slices that you will use within a week. Still Tasty recommends that you use opened, refrigerated cream cheese within a couple of weeks. Very well packed (well wrapped or preferably vacuum packed) cream cheese really should last longer than that. I'd try for keeping a month's worth, refrigerated, in well ...


3

I have frozen eggplant Parmesan before with good results. I breaded the eggplant, fried it, then put Parmesan on top while it was still hot enough to melt. I let them cool and then froze the fried eggplant slices separated by pieces of parchment paper. When I needed to use them, I put them on a sheet pan, still frozen, and threw them in the oven until the ...


3

ABSOLUTELY you can substitute cottage cheese (even fat free) for cream cheese in a cheesecake recipe. Small curd seems to work best--possibly because a bit more of the moisture is retained in the product after draining. After running the cottage cheese through a food processor (I've not found a blender quite powerful enough), you're left with an awesome ...


3

It sounds like whey. Evidently your block was insufficiently strained before being pressed into the mold.


3

The edited question gives three numbers. 23.5 grams / 24.7% fat This is the percentage of fat by weight. V.G / M.G: 70% M.G. is an abbreviation for matières grasses (i.e. fat: think of foie gras!). I'd guess V.G. is the corresponding abbreviation in Dutch. Anyway, this refers to the percentage of the dry matter in the cheese that is fat. For instance ...


3

You are not creaming the cream cheese and sugar. "Cream" means to beat butter and sugar until you have incorporated a lot of air. "Mix cream cheese and sugar" means just that, get a homogenous mixture. There is no point (and I suspect no possibility) to actually replicate the creaming step of cakemaking with cream cheese. Also, cheesecake filling is ...


3

Creaming the cream cheese (fat) and the sugar grinds the sugar crystals making them smaller and also puts air in the globules of fat. Later when you bake the final mixture the air pockets expand making the baked mixture fluffier (increases rise...).


3

Couldn't find cream cheese when I lived in Korea in the 1990's. This is what I did. Get cream that is at least 18% butter fat or higher. Ferment with yogurt cultures, 3 to 5 days the same as yogurt. Salt it, about 1/2 gram per 100 ml. Then drain it using a coffee filter or cheese cloth for one to two days.. To get the desired consistency it may need to be ...


3

Your question is not really answerable. Also, it is based on quite a few misconcceptions about how food safety works. remembered i've made cookies with cream cheese in them... You seem to think that you can predict, based on an ingredient, whether the final product is shelf stable, or not. This is impossible. The final product is either shelf stable or ...


3

When using quark instead of cream cheese, the main issue is that quark is overall “wetter” - especially when the recipe uses US cream cheese, which is pretty much a “brick” compared to the (same brand) product in Germany. You can mitigate that by placing the quark in a cloth-lined sieve overnight to drain it, but that’s optional. I find that most recipes ...


2

The best way to 'get cream cheese' is to make cream cheese, fortunately it isn't difficult. Here is a great video detailing how you can make cream cheese yourself with whole milk (full-fat) milk and lemon juice. This will be very much like the Philadelphia brand cheese you are looking for.


2

You open it: The best before date is merely a guideline, it does not mean the food will be bad after that date (there are posts on this site that expand on this). Still, after almost an extra year, the cream cheese will very likely have gone bad - and this should be immediately noticeably by an off smell or visible mold. If you notice no deterioration, you ...


2

Short answer: Probably. However, there is one thing to keep in mind is that cottage cheese usually has a higher sodium content than cream cheese. Also to get a smoother blend faster try an immersion blender in the jar that came with it, or any narrow, deep 2 cup pyrex measuring cup. I found that the food processor took a long time with a lot of stopping to ...


2

The time it takes is proportional to the thickness of the item heating or cooling. So, you can make the block of cream cheese (or butter, or anything else) warm up quicker by cutting it into small pieces. You need air circulation around the pieces, so they shouldn't be touching. Especially since you often already want cream cheese cut into small chunks for ...


2

Seal it in an airtight zip type bag, squeezing out as much air as possible. Submerge the cream cheese under lukewarm water for several minutes, until softened, which you will be able to feel through the plastic. You can also microwave it on low--but do it slowly, and check it frequently, taking off softened portions so that they don't overheat and melt.


2

I suggest freezing it in oil (so that ice crystals do not form), according to the following procedure: Acquire a sealable plastic container, such as Tupperware, just a bit larger than the total amount of space (volume) the stored cheese will occupy. Obviously you're not limited to the configuration you described. But this method will preserve the cheese for ...


2

The closest Turkish equivalent is kaymak (prononunced like guy-mac but with a k, accent on the second syllable). It is reasonably well available in Turkish mini-marts, although the only available brand may use gums or other thickeners. It is not a perfect substitute, and may not whip well if you mix it with cream for pastry-making. But for mixing into a ...


1

I tried to make yoghurt, but got cream cheese. Been making yoghurt for a long time, spoonful of previous yoghurt in a mug of pasteurized milk, left to stand overnight. So this time I used raw milk, spoonful of previous yoghurt in a mug of raw milk, left to stand overnight. In the morning, it looked wrong, instead of a mug of yoghurt (teaspoon of whey or ...


1

Yes, using lowfat cream cheese could be the reason. Most of the fat content in cream cheese is saturated. Using the right amount of saturated fat in fillings or baking helps them to set or solidify better. If you use Lowfat cream cheese which has about half the fat of regular cream cheese, you are lessening from the solidifying agent of the formula.


1

I have had success breading eggplant and freezing it raw. You can then fry the eggplant (no need to even thaw) when it is time to construct your dish. With a little pre-prepared sauce in the freezer too you can have a scratch made eggplant parmigiano in approx. 15-20 mins.


1

I don't think this dish is ideal for freezing, but if you choose to do so, per Martha Stewart: To Freeze: Assemble dish but do not bake; wrap tightly with foil and freeze, up to 3 months. Thaw completely, then bake as directed.


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